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Re: WTB:Quick Change Tool Post

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  • vachss
    Any of the QCTPs out there will hold the tool. With added expense you re buying a degree of precision and repeatability - no slight shifts when you tighten
    Message 1 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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      Any of the QCTPs out there will hold the tool. With added expense you're buying a degree of precision and repeatability - no slight shifts when you tighten the tool down, etc. That's very nice for high precision work, but (and I may get into big trouble here for suggesting this) may be wasted cost/effort for most of us on older Atlas machines. Sure, we all dream of machining down to "tenths", but how many of us or our machines are capable of this sort of precision? Realistically a Phase II (piston or wedge) AXA-size QCTP is probably fine for any of us (and even a cheaper knock-off clone might be good enough for most).

      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "kroll524" <kroll524@...> wrote:
      >
      > For my 12" Sears/Atlas,guys been reading here trying to take in all this info and I have been looking at the mass amount of info in the files section learning alot.While I'm still in the learning stages of how to operate my lathe,I have been looking for one of those QCTP(AXA I think) over on the auction site and I see Aloris,and no name brands other than the word Aloris in the title but quite a spread in price between the two.I know that Aloris is the best but has anyone use the no name brands?How can a beginner tell if a TP will fit this Atlas?Or if you have a good tool post setting around,let me know.Tks kroll
      >
    • Scott Henion
      ... Yes, I don t see spending more for a QCTP than I paid for the whole lathe. There are cheaper alternatives for a stiff tool holder. A 4-way post is easy to
      Message 2 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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        On 11/3/2012 11:53 AM, vachss wrote:
        > Any of the QCTPs out there will hold the tool. With added expense you're buying a degree of precision and repeatability - no slight shifts when you tighten the tool down, etc. That's very nice for high precision work, but (and I may get into big trouble here for suggesting this) may be wasted cost/effort for most of us on older Atlas machines. Sure, we all dream of machining down to "tenths", but how many of us or our machines are capable of this sort of precision? Realistically a Phase II (piston or wedge) AXA-size QCTP is probably fine for any of us (and even a cheaper knock-off clone might be good enough for most).

        Yes, I don't see spending more for a QCTP than I paid for the whole lathe.

        There are cheaper alternatives for a stiff tool holder. A 4-way post is
        easy to make. Here's a 2-way I made:
        http://shdesigns.org/Craftsman-12x36/toolpost.shtml

        Mine came with a Phase II. Works well and it is real nice to be able to
        drop in a turning tool, then a facing tool and then a boring bar all
        without having to adjust the height.


        --

        ------------------------------------
        Scott G. Henion
        Craftsman 12x36 lathe:
        http://shdesigns.org/Craftsman12x36
        ------------------------------------
      • Guenther Paul
        Sorry i did not make myself clear. I meant a quick change gear box  GP ________________________________ From: Guenther Paul To:
        Message 3 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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          Sorry i did not make myself clear. I meant a quick change gear box
           GP




          ________________________________
          From: Guenther Paul <paulguenter@...>
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, November 3, 2012 9:58:51 AM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] WTB:Quick Change Tool Post

           
          You all are talking about QC. How much are you willing to pay for one that is
          very similar to a atlas and looks the same and

          works like it

           GP

          ________________________________
          From: Jerry Freeman <jerry@...>
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Sat, November 3, 2012 9:04:19 AM
          Subject: RE: [atlas_craftsman] WTB:Quick Change Tool Post

           
          I have a Phase II QCTP on my Atlas 10 inch lathe, and I've been extremely
          happy with it.

          Best wishes,

          Jerry

          From: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Jon Elson
          Sent: Saturday, November 03, 2012 8:50 AM
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] WTB:Quick Change Tool Post

          On 11/03/2012 07:24 AM, kroll524 wrote:
          > For my 12" Sears/Atlas,guys been reading here trying to take in all this
          info and I have been looking at the mass amount of info in the files section
          learning alot.While I'm still in the learning stages of how to operate my
          lathe,I have been looking for one of those QCTP(AXA I think) over on the
          auction site and I see Aloris,and no name brands other than the word Aloris
          in the title but quite a spread in price between the two.I know that Aloris
          is the best but has anyone use the no name brands?How can a beginner tell if
          a TP will fit this Atlas?Or if you have a good tool post setting around,let
          me know.Tks kroll
          >
          There are 2 basic designs of these, piston and wedge. The piston type has a
          cam-operated plunger that pushes the holder out against the angled
          dovetail sides to lock the holder. The wedge style has a coarse screw
          thread that slides a tapered wedge on one of the dovetail sides
          to pull the holder in against the flats of the dovetail. I used a
          Phase-II piston-style post on a 10" and later moved it to a 12"
          lathe, and thought it was fine. I later moved up to a 15" Sheldon
          lathe that weighs 3500 Lbs and has a 5 Hp motor, and thought a
          wedge-style might be more appropriate for that machine.

          So, a well-made piston post like the Phase-II should be quite adequate.
          Some of the other knock-offs may not be as well made.

          Jon

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        • Richard Marchi
          I bought the CDCO wedge type AXA for my 10F. The T nut was the correct thickness, but too wide to fit the slot, so I used a hack saw and file to cut it down
          Message 4 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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            I bought the CDCO wedge type AXA for my 10F. The "T" nut was the correct thickness, but too wide to fit the slot, so I used a hack saw and file to cut it down to the right width. My compound casting had a "hump" that prevented the holder base from seating. Fortunately, I have a mill and was able to mill the flat on the compound back enough to seat the AXA. You should check on that for your situation.

            I am quite happy with the operation of the CDCO tool post. However, in many one-off situations using a lantern tool post is just as fast and probably easier to set up since the tool angle and height can be set at the same time. If you're doing multiple pieces, the QC wins by a lot.

            Good luck,

            Dick





            Richard Marchi
            Gangplank Marina Slip H-22
            Washington, DC 20024






            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Jon Elson
            ... Ugh, the hideous lantern toolpost? I had one that came with my Atlas, and am glad I don t even have one for my Sheldon. After you ve had one slip on
            Message 5 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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              On 11/03/2012 08:58 AM, Guenther Paul wrote:
              > You all are talking about QC. How much are you willing to pay for one that is
              > very similar to a atlas and looks the same and
              >
              > works like it
              >
              >
              Ugh, the hideous "lantern" toolpost? I had one that came with my Atlas, and
              am glad I don't even have one for my Sheldon. After you've had
              one slip on you when parting-off, you will not want to ever use them
              again. And, if you flip the concave washer over to prevent slipping, then
              you have to mess with shims for height adjustment. Ugh, what a pain.

              Unless you are restoring a shop for museum display, I think the
              era for the lantern post has long passed.

              (just my personal opinion!)

              Jon
            • Jon Elson
              ... Ahh, very different. Well, any QC that was designed for a lathe with an 8 TPI leadscrew should be adaptable to the Atlas. How easy or difficult this
              Message 6 of 14 , Nov 3, 2012
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                On 11/03/2012 11:38 AM, Guenther Paul wrote:
                > Sorry i did not make myself clear. I meant a quick change gear box
                >
                Ahh, very different. Well, any QC that was designed for a lathe with an
                8 TPI
                leadscrew should be adaptable to the Atlas. How easy or difficult this
                would
                be depends entirely on the shape of that QC. In general it shouldn't be
                that
                hard, but the spacing of the input shaft from the rear-most part of the
                QC will be important to determine how it fits. Due to the apron, it
                is not easy to move the leadscrew to a different location, so the QC
                needs to align to where the leadscrew is.

                Jon
              • L. Garlinghouse
                A sort of piggyback to Richard s input. Rather than machine off the hump on my 10F, I made another T-spacer [just like the T-nut, but no threads] which spaced
                Message 7 of 14 , Nov 4, 2012
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                  A sort of piggyback to Richard's input.

                  Rather than machine off the hump on my 10F, I made another T-spacer [just
                  like the T-nut, but no threads] which spaced the toolpost above the hump and
                  would allow it to be rotated. On my QCTP [a no-name cheapo, but perfectly
                  satisfactory] there is about a 3/8" hole at the rear RH corner. I drilled 2
                  matching holes in my T-spacer 15 degrees apart and made a pin that fits in
                  the tool holder. I made sure I put the holes such that if I have my
                  compound set at 30-degrees and the QCTP set so the tools are parallel or
                  90-degree to the work, I can quickly go to 45-degrees by rotating the
                  toolpost. In my mind, this setting is repeatable because of my pin setup.

                  I have also experimented with a spring loaded ball in said hole, and several
                  indentations on the spacer. I decided the T-spacer was needed because the
                  holder would turn when trying to knurl. I was unable to get the right sized
                  ball to make the spring loaded ball a really successful endeavor so I've
                  ended up with a pin . . . at least for now.

                  There is also a 3/8"-24tpi hole out the rear RH side near the corner that I
                  used to attach a stubby handle to rotate the toolpost as req'd.

                  I got mine from CDCO and was very pleased. After years and years of using
                  the traditional lantern rocker set-up I was VERY pleased with the upgrade.

                  L8r,
                  L.H. Garlinghouse
                  Deep in the Southern Ozarks where the Fall leaves make it all worthwhile.


                  ----------
                  Sat Nov 3, 2012 1:40 pm (PDT) . Posted by: "Richard Marchi" marchirichard
                  I bought the CDCO wedge type AXA for my 10F. The "T" nut was the correct
                  thickness, but too wide to fit the slot, so I used a hack saw and file to
                  cut it down to the right width. My compound casting had a "hump" that
                  prevented the holder base from seating. Fortunately, I have a mill and was
                  able to mill the flat on the compound back enough to seat the AXA. You
                  should check on that for your situation.
                  I am quite happy with the operation of the CDCO tool post. However, in many
                  one-off situations using a lantern tool post is just as fast and probably
                  easier to set up since the tool angle and height can be set at the same
                  time. If you're doing multiple pieces, the QC wins by a lot.
                • Charles
                  I understand your point of view, and I will admit I have a QCTP on my big lathe, but I keep in mind that the lantern toolpost served in two world wars and for
                  Message 8 of 14 , Nov 5, 2012
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                    I understand your point of view, and I will admit I have a QCTP on my big lathe,
                    but I keep in mind that the lantern toolpost served in two world wars and for
                    several apollo missions so it is capable of turning out precision work at
                    production speeds. Turret style posts were advertised in tool catalogs since at
                    least the 1800s but it wasn't til the advent of cheap carbide that they
                    disappeared I don't think. I keep a number around and use them still.


                    Charles




                    ________________________________
                    From: Jon Elson <elson@...>

                    Ugh, the hideous "lantern" toolpost? I had one that came with my Atlas, and
                    am glad I don't even have one for my Sheldon. After you've had
                    one slip on you when parting-off, you will not want to ever use them
                    again.


                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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