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Re: DRO Prototype for Windows PC

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  • rlstrand
    Jon, Did some more checking on CNC conversion for my mill: http://www.ajaxcnc.com/mach3-cnc-control-systems/ Mach3 CNC Kit With 3-Axis DC Servo Drive & PLC:
    Message 1 of 37 , Jan 31, 2012
      Jon,

      Did some more checking on CNC conversion for my mill:

      http://www.ajaxcnc.com/mach3-cnc-control-systems/
      Mach3 CNC Kit With 3-Axis DC Servo Drive & PLC: $1795

      http://www.elrodmachine.com/CNC%20XY%20Ball%20Screws.htm
      Ball screws for mill $2,084.00

      Assuming I could build my own brackets from scratch, make my yoke work and the 15 amp servos are big enough.

      Then for around $4000 instead of $300-$400 I could convert my mill to CNC instead of DRO.

      rlstrand

      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "rlstrand" <rlstrand@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Jon,
      >
      > I have looked at Mach3 and LinuxCNC and ELS before. If I was going to go DIY CNC I might start with those.
      >
      > I checked out the Gecko 540 I don't think it will handle my 10x48 Bridgeport clone. I would need to look into bigger motors.
      >
      > I ran a CNC Bridgeport that was controlled by big steppers, man was it noisy. The newer one we have uses DC servos, much quieter.
      >
      > For now to keep costs low I am just looking into linear scales. And my own interface, an old throw away Laptop and a $28 LPCXpresso board. The rest of the interface comes from the junk bin.
      >
      > I may replace the laptop with a 7 inch WinCE touchscreen from the junk bin later. Or I may convert back from C# to C++ and then I could drop the code into a Honeywell WebPAD with an 800x600 touch screen. (Runs WinCE 4.0 not enough ram for .NET 3.5)
      >
      >
      > rlstrand
      >
      > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@> wrote:
      > >
      > > rlstrand wrote:
      > > > Not sure there is any interest here in this topic but here it goes.
      > > >
      > > > A friends Acu-rite II went bad the other day. I was able to fix it but it got me start an a project I have been I have been think about for some time.
      > > >
      > > > The idea it to look at what other type of features could be added to a DRO with out making a full CNC mill. I wanted to be able to load in a DXF file of the part and view the tool location relative to it.
      > > >
      > > Well, I'm not sure what is so great about this. If you are going to all
      > > the trouble of
      > > hooking a PC to a machine tool, then why NOT have the PC control the
      > > machine?
      > > I have had a CNC mill since 1997, and would really HATE to go back to manual
      > > I used to sweat all the time that I'd make a dumb mistake and turn the
      > > handle the
      > > wrong way and put a big gouge in a part that I'd been working on for hours.
      > > You make less mistakes with CNC, and they are usually corrected very easily
      > > if you take a little care with it. (You can also make a big goof, but
      > > then it is
      > > just a little wasted stock.)
      > >
      > > There is Mach3 and LinuxCNC (formerly known as EMC2). Small mills
      > > like the X2 can be converted with small steppers and the Gecko 540
      > > multi-axis
      > > driver pretty cheaply, depending on how good a scrounger you are. I use
      > > LinuxCNC. I started using the original EMC in 1998, and think it is great.
      > > And, both the OS and CNC program are open-source, and thus free.
      > >
      > > Jon
      > >
      >
    • Jon Elson
      ... The temperature changes and associated condensation is probably worse on the machines and tooling than it is on computers. It is probably harder on the
      Message 37 of 37 , Feb 23, 2012
        Guenther Paul wrote:
        > I was wondering if any of you live in a cold climate and don't heat your shop
        > 24/7 . I like to have my computer in the shop but i am concerned about the
        > temperature changes and humidity. I only heat the shop when i working in it.
        > Some say its ok to have a computer in a environment that goes down to 10
        > degrees. Has any one try ed this or has experience with this.
        >
        The temperature changes and associated condensation is probably worse on the
        machines and tooling than it is on computers. It is probably harder on
        the hard
        drives than anything else.

        Jon
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