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Re: newbe

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  • cuttysark71
    A word of caution; steer clear of detergent oils. I used to use ordinary 10W30 motor oil on non-running surfaces like the mill table, just for protection
    Message 1 of 9 , Sep 1, 2011
      A word of caution; steer clear of detergent oils. I used to use ordinary 10W30 motor oil on non-running surfaces like the mill table, just for protection against rusting. In the winter (in western NY state) I heat my shop with a salamander type kerosene heater, 150,000 BUT. It blows a lot of moisture into the air. I noticed that things started to rust a little anyway but always caught it early and cleaned and re-oiled the surfaces. Then one day when it was unusually warm for the time of year, I opened the overhead door and soon had condensation on things. The motor oiled surfaces had that milky look, like wheel bearings exposed to water. Researching is, this is what I found out. The detergent oils have additives that attract moisture when the engine is cold and hang on to it. When the engine is running and warms up, the oil additives release their hold on the water and it engine heat causes it to vaporize and be expelled from the engine via the crankcase ventilator line. On my machines, the water just stayed bound to the oil and started the rusting process. I switched to straight 30 weight non-detergent oil and the problem was solved.

      Like most of the members here, I use Vactra on the machine ways, #2 on the Atlas lathe, and #4 on the mill and shaper, and the 10/30 weight 50/50 mix (non-detergent) for the timken bearing spindle on the Atlas.





      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, jo barden <jobarden422@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > older style automotive engine oil, must admit I use this as it is cheap and lubricates. It also has some shear resisting properties but detergent not needed.
      > JonG6UWK
    • Richard Hughson
      This is good to know. I ve seen people be very adamant about not using detergent oils on machinery but never heard an explanation of why. This makes sense,
      Message 2 of 9 , Sep 1, 2011
        This is good to know. I've seen people be very adamant about not using detergent oils on machinery but never heard an explanation of why. This makes sense, that water is held in suspension in the oil until engine heat boils it off.
         
        Thanks,
         
        Rick H

        From: cuttysark71 <cuttysark71@...>
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, September 1, 2011 8:29 AM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: newbe


         
        A word of caution; steer clear of detergent oils. I used to use ordinary 10W30 motor oil on non-running surfaces like the mill table, just for protection against rusting. In the winter (in western NY state) I heat my shop with a salamander type kerosene heater, 150,000 BUT. It blows a lot of moisture into the air. I noticed that things started to rust a little anyway but always caught it early and cleaned and re-oiled the surfaces. Then one day when it was unusually warm for the time of year, I opened the overhead door and soon had condensation on things. The motor oiled surfaces had that milky look, like wheel bearings exposed to water. Researching is, this is what I found out. The detergent oils have additives that attract moisture when the engine is cold and hang on to it. When the engine is running and warms up, the oil additives release their hold on the water and it engine heat causes it to vaporize and be expelled from the engine via the crankcase
        ventilator line. On my machines, the water just stayed bound to the oil and started the rusting process. I switched to straight 30 weight non-detergent oil and the problem was solved.

        Like most of the members here, I use Vactra on the machine ways, #2 on the Atlas lathe, and #4 on the mill and shaper, and the 10/30 weight 50/50 mix (non-detergent) for the timken bearing spindle on the Atlas.

        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, jo barden <jobarden422@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > older style automotive engine oil, must admit I use this as it is cheap and lubricates. It also has some shear resisting properties but detergent not needed.
        > JonG6UWK




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