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HarborFreight bench grinder

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  • Tazwell
    Can a 1997 Harbor Freight Wet/Dry Grinder (Item No 35098) be re-wired to run at 1725 rpm?
    Message 1 of 5 , Jul 26, 2011
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      Can a 1997 Harbor Freight Wet/Dry Grinder (Item No 35098) be re-wired to run at 1725 rpm?
    • shenion@shdesigns.org
        ...   Sure, just unwind all the windings, cut poles to make it a 2-pole motor then rewind it in a 2-pole configuration. Easy as pie ;)   It is a fixed
      Message 2 of 5 , Jul 26, 2011
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        On July 26, 2011 at 1:30 PM Tazwell <tazwellbramlette@...> wrote:

        > Can a 1997 Harbor Freight Wet/Dry Grinder (Item No 35098) be re-wired to run
        > at 1725 rpm?
        >
        >  
         
        Sure, just unwind all the windings, cut poles to make it a 2-pole motor then
        rewind it in a 2-pole configuration. Easy as pie ;)
         
        It is a fixed speed motor by design of the # of poles. Can not be changed.
         

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Keith Mc
        ... Simply? NOT EASILY. With most AC motors, the load, the line frequency, and the number of poles determines the motor s speed. Now given a 3-phase motor,
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 26, 2011
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          Tazwell <tazwellbramlette@...> wrote:
          > Can a 1997 Harbor Freight Wet/Dry Grinder (Item No 35098) be re-wired to run
          > at 1725 rpm?

          Simply? NOT EASILY. With most AC motors, the load, the line frequency, and the
          number of poles determines the motor's speed.

          Now given a 3-phase motor, you can easy change it via a VFD. I have not researched
          them, but I hear of references to VFDs for single phase motors. If you can find one,
          you may be able to con it into running faster by changing the line frequency.

          However, you're probably better off simply changing the motor, to a 3ph.
          They're pretty cheap these days.

          But OOC, WHY is it critical to reach that particular speed? What are you doing with it?
          You're talking about a cheap grinder here. Doesn't it grind well enough at the speed
          you are currently running?

          - Keith Mc.
        • Tazwell
          ... I was asking for a friend who prides himself in always finding the lowest cost solution to a problem. The motivation was to be able to use a diamond
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 26, 2011
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            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Keith Mc <acti@...> wrote:
            >
            > Tazwell <tazwellbramlette@> wrote:
            > > Can a 1997 Harbor Freight Wet/Dry Grinder (Item No 35098) be re-wired to run
            > > at 1725 rpm?
            >
            > Simply? NOT EASILY. With most AC motors, the load, the line frequency, and the
            > number of poles determines the motor's speed.
            >
            > Now given a 3-phase motor, you can easy change it via a VFD. I have not researched
            > them, but I hear of references to VFDs for single phase motors. If you can find one,
            > you may be able to con it into running faster by changing the line frequency.
            >


            > However, you're probably better off simply changing the motor, to a 3ph.
            > They're pretty cheap these days.
            >
            > But OOC, WHY is it critical to reach that particular speed? What are you doing with it?
            > You're talking about a cheap grinder here. Doesn't it grind well enough at the speed
            > you are currently running?
            >
            > - Keith Mc.
            >
            I was asking for a friend who prides himself in always finding the lowest cost solution to a problem. The motivation was to be able to use a diamond impregnated aluminium wheel from Woodcraft that has a maximum speed of 1725 rpm (an excellent wheel, by the way--I use it exclusively for my HSS wood lathe tools).

            Since blowing the leads out of my voltmeter (nonprescription safety glasses let me set the voltmeter to millamps instead of volts) while trouble shooting my 220volt, 5hp table saw I have relied upon the expertise of Telco Electric and my electricion for my electrical needs
          • Keith Mc
            ... (Whoops)... FYI, most meters have an internal fuse to protect it from that particular boo-boo. Open it up and look for it. Hopefully, you can at least
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 1, 2011
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              Tazwell <tazwellbramlette@...> wrote:
              > Since blowing the leads out of my voltmeter (nonprescription safety glasses let me
              > set the voltmeter to millamps instead of volts) while trouble shooting my 220volt,
              > 5hp table saw I have relied upon the expertise of Telco Electric and my electrician
              > for my electrical needs

              (Whoops)... FYI, most meters have an internal fuse to protect it from that
              particular boo-boo. Open it up and look for it. Hopefully, you can at least
              get your meter back.

              - Keith Mc.
              --
              "A good fuse is always important... both on your meter, and on your dynamite..."
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