Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: wood turning attachment

Expand Messages
  • wedhanson@verizon.net
    Hi all: I also live in Pennsylvania, and I believe that most of the lumber made from logs harvested in this state are from hardwood trees like red and white
    Message 1 of 15 , Jun 1, 2011
    • 0 Attachment
      Hi all:
      I also live in Pennsylvania, and I believe that most of the lumber made from logs harvested in this state are from hardwood trees like red and white oak, poplar, sassafras, black walnut, most Maples, etc. Most of the conifers go into paper and cardboard manufacture.
      The framing lumber that you get at Home Depot or Lowe's, etc is almost always Spruce these days. The Douglas Fir that they were made from years ago, is very short supply because of stupid clear cutting, and is now extremely expensive.
      I have turned many spindles and/or stretchers for broken ones in some chairs that I have repaired. Mostly Oak, Maple or walnut. Special size dowels for tennoning has been found very useful. Hard to find 7/16 or 9/16" ready made dowels in the hardware store!!! I agree that the wood dust is not good for the Atlas metal lathes, so cleaning after use is essential. Well, enough of my rant--- W. Ed Hanson

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • JACK SIMS
      Whet kind of wood are you making the seats out of. Jack ... From: Harry Boyd To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:54 AM Subject:
      Message 2 of 15 , Jun 1, 2011
      • 0 Attachment
        Whet kind of wood are you making the seats out of.
        Jack
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Harry Boyd
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:54 AM
        Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: wood turning attachment



        Hi Jack,

        I'd like to know more about which particular carbide inserts you have found to
        be most useful when turning wood. I make reel seat inserts for my bamboo fly
        rods on my A/C lathe and have found that high speed steel bits work best for me.

        Thanks in advance,
        Harry Boyd

        ________________________________
        From: JACK <jack-br549@...>
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Mon, May 30, 2011 10:37:54 PM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: wood turning attachment

        Ben
        If all you want to do is make straight or tapered cus,and turn threads on wood
        with metal cutting tools you will not need a different tool rest. Just get a
        insert holder for the AXA that you have now because carbide tools WILL give you
        a good finish on HARD wood.
        If you have any more questions send them to me off list.
        I am turning some wood now on my lathe using carbide inserts and power feed, so
        at least you get a good finish and a straight piece.
        Jack Sims
        Carrollton, Texas

        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Ben D'Avanza <bendavanza@...> wrote:
        >
        > Was/is there a wood turning attachment for the 12x lathes? I saw references to
        >turning wood in my Atlas manual but no parts descriptions. I don't have room for
        >another machine but I would like to turn wood occasionally, and using the metal
        >cutting tools makes for rough wood. I also had hoped to turn threads on wood,
        >making huge nuts and bolts.
        > I have an AXA toolpost, perhaps a tool rest could be made to fit that or would
        >it need to be stiffer?
        >

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Harry Boyd
        Many different kinds, but all are either burls or highly figured wood. My most popular are striped maple, spalted maple and hackberry, and black ash burls.
        Message 3 of 15 , Jun 2, 2011
        • 0 Attachment
          Many different kinds, but all are either burls or highly figured wood. My most
          popular are striped maple, spalted maple and hackberry, and black ash burls.




          ________________________________
          From: JACK SIMS <jack-br549@...>
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Wed, June 1, 2011 10:19:27 PM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: wood turning attachment


          Whet kind of wood are you making the seats out of.
          Jack
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: Harry Boyd
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Tuesday, May 31, 2011 8:54 AM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: wood turning attachment

          Hi Jack,

          I'd like to know more about which particular carbide inserts you have found to
          be most useful when turning wood. I make reel seat inserts for my bamboo fly
          rods on my A/C lathe and have found that high speed steel bits work best for me.

          Thanks in advance,
          Harry Boyd

          ________________________________
          From: JACK <jack-br549@...>
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Mon, May 30, 2011 10:37:54 PM
          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: wood turning attachment

          Ben
          If all you want to do is make straight or tapered cus,and turn threads on wood
          with metal cutting tools you will not need a different tool rest. Just get a
          insert holder for the AXA that you have now because carbide tools WILL give you
          a good finish on HARD wood.
          If you have any more questions send them to me off list.
          I am turning some wood now on my lathe using carbide inserts and power feed, so
          at least you get a good finish and a straight piece.
          Jack Sims
          Carrollton, Texas

          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Ben D'Avanza <bendavanza@...> wrote:
          >
          > Was/is there a wood turning attachment for the 12x lathes? I saw references to

          >turning wood in my Atlas manual but no parts descriptions. I don't have room for
          >
          >another machine but I would like to turn wood occasionally, and using the metal

          >cutting tools makes for rough wood. I also had hoped to turn threads on wood,
          >making huge nuts and bolts.
          > I have an AXA toolpost, perhaps a tool rest could be made to fit that or would

          >it need to be stiffer?
          >

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tazwell
          ... I completely agree with Brad s comments regarding using the Atlas Lathe for wood turning. However if you do get a tool rest (see photo in Taz s Lathe
          Message 4 of 15 , Jun 2, 2011
          • 0 Attachment
            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Brad Lehman <lehman.brad@...> wrote:
            >
            > I can tell you that oak is a real pain to turn. All of those pores
            > make it so that what is coming off is more like dust than a ribbon of
            > wood. It tends to be really stringy as well. Anything soft and
            > straight grained is a pretty good place to start. Stay away from
            > anything with really pronounced grains and/or knots.
            >
            > The HD stuff in your area might be Southern Yellow Pine, which is
            > pretty hard for what most people think of as pine. As a matter of
            > fact, some people will go well out of their way to get Southern Yellow
            > Pine as a material for building workbenches.
            >
            > Wood availability is kind of odd. What gets used as framing lumber is
            > whatever is available in the region in abundance. I'm in PA, so it's
            > mostly Fir being used as framing stock. Further south, it's Southern
            > Yellow Pine. From what I understand, out west, redwood is nothing
            > special. Where I live, guys pay large sums of money for it. Supply and
            > demand I guess?
            >
            >
            > On May 30, 2011, at 8:03 AM, Ben D'Avanza wrote:
            >
            > > I had not put too much thought into the type of wood yet. I do have
            > > a small vertical bandsaw, and a table saw with a router table insert.
            > > I thought the 2x4's at Home Depot were pine? I'm no expert by any
            > > means. I'm in Dallas, TX.
            > > -Ben
            > >
            > >
            > > On May 30, 2011, at 6:53 AM, Brad Lehman wrote:
            > >
            > > With enough persistence, you can do just about anything. Personally, I
            > > think the finding/building a wood cutting toolrest would be the least
            > > of your worries. I had a wood lathe (and still do) for quite a while
            > > until I recently bought a metal lathe, so take this for what it's
            > > worth:
            > >
            > > - Cutting wood in a metal lathe seems to me like it is going to create
            > > a pretty terrible mess. Saw dust and wood shavings mixed with oil...
            > > yuck. Many wooda tend to be acidic, which I think would probably speed
            > > up rusting if you aren't careful. This isn't a big problem with a wood
            > > lathe, since it really isn't a precision instrument. Better wood
            > > lathes have a LOT of mass/rigidity though, far more than the typical
            > > atlas/craftsman lathe. No criticism, it's just that in wood turning,
            > > you are spending a lot of time turning things that are inherently out
            > > of balance. I could be wrong, but I would think that even repeatedly
            > > rounding square stock would take a toll on the atlas/craftsman.
            > >
            > > - The actual cutting action of a wood lathe and tool is much different
            > > than their metal counterparts. Almost directly opposite in fact. With
            > > most wood cuts (planing cuts), you actually want to set the tool
            > > height slightly above center and rub the bevel on the wood as you cut.
            > > This makes the fibers shear off cleanly as they are being supported by
            > > the bevel rubbing along. Metal lathe tooling is setup to create a
            > > clearance angle so that the bevel doesn't touch the work. In fact, it
            > > seems to me like the basic metal cutting setup is more like "scraping'
            > > in wood lathe terminology. However, a wood scraping tool relies on a
            > > burr on the cutting edge to peel the wood off of the workpiece. I
            > > point this out in case you want to keep making attempts at cutting
            > > wood using the metal cutting toolpost setup. Personally, I think that
            > > with a lantern toolpost you would probably create a good setup and
            > > make a nice cut. The problem is that the tool would need adjusted for
            > > just about every pass to keep the bevel in the right alignment as the
            > > workpiece gets smaller and smaller.
            > >
            > > - If you are space limited, don't get too interested in wood. Much
            > > like the metal lathe tooling, you'll find yourself wanting all sorts
            > > of tooling for wood as well. And then the inevitable wood cutting
            > > vertical bandsaw, etc.
            > >
            > > - Finally, what type of wood are you trying to turn? Some types are
            > > downright awful. I would recommend common fir framing stock (yes, like
            > > the home depot 2x4s in most areas of the country) as a very forgiving
            > > wood to mess around with, and it's cheap too. Turned with the right
            > > technique and a very sharp tool, it will look almost polished.
            > >
            > > On May 30, 2011, at 7:08 AM, Ben D'Avanza wrote:
            > >
            > > > Was/is there a wood turning attachment for the 12x lathes? I saw
            > > > references to turning wood in my Atlas manual but no parts
            > > > descriptions. I don't have room for another machine but I would like
            > > > to turn wood occasionally, and using the metal cutting tools makes
            > > > for rough wood. I also had hoped to turn threads on wood, making
            > > > huge nuts and bolts.
            > > > I have an AXA toolpost, perhaps a tool rest could be made to fit
            > > > that or would it need to be stiffer?
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            > >

            I completely agree with Brad's comments regarding using the Atlas Lathe for wood turning. However if you do get a tool rest (see photo in "Taz's Lathe Tools") and remove the carriage you can at least get a feel for whether you want to get more involved in wood turning. It does become an addicting and an expensive habit. I am a self-taught wood worker, and I have to say that the wood lathe was not an intuitive machine to learn. It was not until I enrolled in the wood turning program in our local community college that I became reasonably proficient.

            The Atlas lathe is very useful for making speciality tools for use with a wood lathe. I am using this application (and especially this forum)to teach myself metal working, providig tools to my classmates who provide me with raw material and feedback regarding various concepts.

            The responses of members of this forum to my questions were invaluable during my lathe restoration project, which took more than a year to complete.

            Many thanks to all.

            Taz
            > > ------------------------------------
            > >
            > > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
            > > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
            > > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
            > >
            > > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
            > >
            > > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or
            > > links http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
            > >
            > > The Atlas-Craftsman Wiki is at http://pico-systems.com/cgi-bin/Atlas-wiki/Atlas.cgi
            > > Please submit things you think will be useful to Jon Elson at mailto://elson@...
            > > ! Groups Links
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.