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Re: Hard to read feed dials

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  • mertnedp
    Make new larger dials will be a permanent solution. Other wise cleaning and paint is the only way to make the small dials better.
    Message 1 of 10 , Apr 3, 2011
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      Make new larger dials will be a permanent solution.
      Other wise cleaning and paint is the only way to make the small dials better.

      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "gsolecki" <gsolecki@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi again,My numbers on my feed dials are hard to see on my 10" Atlas lathe.Is there a way to bring the numbers and lines out so they can be seen better.
      >
      > Greg
      >
    • DW Pete
      I was also think about making bigger dials, but i have not figured out how to engrave or mark the dials accurately Don
      Message 2 of 10 , Apr 3, 2011
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        I was also think about making bigger dials, but i have not figured out how to engrave or mark the dials accurately

        Don

        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "mertnedp" <pdentrem@...> wrote:
        >
        > Make new larger dials will be a permanent solution.
        > Other wise cleaning and paint is the only way to make the small dials better.
        >
        > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "gsolecki" <gsolecki@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi again,My numbers on my feed dials are hard to see on my 10" Atlas lathe.Is there a way to bring the numbers and lines out so they can be seen better.
        > >
        > > Greg
        > >
        >
      • mertnedp
        See post 66815. I had posted on how I had my own larger dials. There is also a webpage that uses a dividing head and a DIY engraver/scratcher to do the same
        Message 3 of 10 , Apr 4, 2011
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          See post 66815. I had posted on how I had my own larger dials. There is also a webpage that uses a dividing head and a DIY engraver/scratcher to do the same job.


          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "DW Pete" <don@...> wrote:
          >
          > I was also think about making bigger dials, but i have not figured out how to engrave or mark the dials accurately
          >
          > Don
          >
          > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "mertnedp" <pdentrem@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Make new larger dials will be a permanent solution.
          > > Other wise cleaning and paint is the only way to make the small dials better.
          > >
          > > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "gsolecki" <gsolecki@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > Hi again,My numbers on my feed dials are hard to see on my 10" Atlas lathe.Is there a way to bring the numbers and lines out so they can be seen better.
          > > >
          > > > Greg
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Russ Kepler
          ... Absent a dividing head there are several ways, all you really need is a way of getting evenly spaced markings. You can get acceptable results with many
          Message 4 of 10 , Apr 4, 2011
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            On Sunday 03 April 2011 19:04:06 DW Pete wrote:
            > I was also think about making bigger dials, but i have not figured out how
            > to engrave or mark the dials accurately

            Absent a dividing head there are several ways, all you really need is a way of
            getting evenly spaced markings. You can get acceptable results with many
            printers, a chuck of bandsaw blade may be used or if you're "old school" you
            can use a drafting board.

            After you have a strip of something with the approprite number of divisions
            (remembering the fencepost problem) simply turn the diameter of a disk until
            the strip wraps appropriately. Make a pointer and a sharp V tool to cut the
            divisions. Use carriage travel for the cut and a micrometer stop to adjust
            the length of cut to mark major and minor divisions.

            All in all it's easier with a dividing head but it is possible to do accurate
            work with this technique.
          • CHRIS
            Isnt this refered to as hobbing?
            Message 5 of 10 , Apr 4, 2011
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              Isnt this refered to as hobbing?

              --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Russ Kepler <russ@...> wrote:
              >
              > On Sunday 03 April 2011 19:04:06 DW Pete wrote:
              > > I was also think about making bigger dials, but i have not figured out how
              > > to engrave or mark the dials accurately
              >
              > Absent a dividing head there are several ways, all you really need is a way of
              > getting evenly spaced markings. You can get acceptable results with many
              > printers, a chuck of bandsaw blade may be used or if you're "old school" you
              > can use a drafting board.
              >
              > After you have a strip of something with the approprite number of divisions
              > (remembering the fencepost problem) simply turn the diameter of a disk until
              > the strip wraps appropriately. Make a pointer and a sharp V tool to cut the
              > divisions. Use carriage travel for the cut and a micrometer stop to adjust
              > the length of cut to mark major and minor divisions.
              >
              > All in all it's easier with a dividing head but it is possible to do accurate
              > work with this technique.
              >
            • Russ Kepler
              ... No, dividing is not hobbing. Hobbing usually refers to the production of a gear using a spiral toothed cutter (called a hob) applied against a rotating
              Message 6 of 10 , Apr 4, 2011
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                On Monday 04 April 2011 20:20:02 CHRIS wrote:
                > Isnt this refered to as hobbing?

                No, dividing is not hobbing. Hobbing usually refers to the production of a
                gear using a spiral toothed cutter (called a hob) applied against a rotating
                blank that's geared to the hob pitch. The hob is usually moved across the
                blank perpendicular to the face to create the gear teeth after several
                passes.

                Hobbing can also be used to form a worm gear using a cutter in the shape of
                the worm that's fed into the worm gear blank. Often the blank is "gashed" to
                the proper number of teeth using a dividing process, this to make sure that
                the hob doesn't jump any teeth when starting in the cut. The hob is fed
                directly into the blank and forms teeth shaped inversely to the hob tooth
                form.
              • anthrhodes@aol.com
                Greg, Lot s of good answers. You could also mount your original dial and the one to be divided on a common arbor and use the original to index for marking the
                Message 7 of 10 , Apr 6, 2011
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                  Greg,

                  Lot's of good answers. You could also mount your original dial and the one
                  to be divided on a common arbor and use the original to index for marking
                  the new one.

                  Anthony
                  Berkeley, Calif.
                  ************************************************

                  In a message dated Sun Apr 3, 2011 10:11 am (PDT), gsolecki writes:

                  My numbers on my feed dials are hard to see on my 10" Atlas lathe.Is there
                  a way to bring the numbers and lines out so they can be seen better.



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