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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Atlas Pick-A-Gear photos

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  • Keith Mc
    Looks like a cool project. I want one! It looks like it d just take an accurate flat plate drawing, and a recovered graphic to make it! Heck, given the
    Message 1 of 8 , Apr 1, 2011
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      Looks like a cool project. I want one! <grin>
      It looks like it'd just take an accurate flat plate drawing, and a recovered graphic to make it!

      Heck, given the two items above, we could each then create personal UPGRADES, to hold
      additional gears of any mix, and other related hardware (spare keylock spacers, etc.)

      Let's go for it...
      I'll start with the flat plate drawing, and then talk about recovering the graphic.

      Hey Dan, those are some wonderful pics! Summary, from Dan's pics, at:
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/photos/album/1447494289/pic/list

      DB_Pick-A-Gear_001
      ... Atlas Pick-A-Gear Rack Full. Note the rare 50T gear
      DB_Pick-A-Gear_002
      ... Pick-A-Gear Rack Open slots, .510 wide, cut into formed 0.070" thick steel sheet metal
      DB_Pick-A-Gear_003
      ... Atlas Pick-A-Gear Rack 8.75" Width
      DB_Pick-A-Gear_004
      ... Pick-A-Gear Rack end view. Dimensions 4.312" wide, 2.360 to top of arc, ~ 1.56 Radius
      DB_Pick-A-Gear_005
      ... [Shows a single gear, supported by what LOOKS like about 120 degrees of its circumference.]

      On Mar 29, 2011, Dan Buchanan <db45acp@[...]> wrote:
      > It could probably be easily reproduced on a mill using flat sheet
      > stock on a sub-plate. Cut the slots with a 1/2" endmill to appropriate
      > lengths then bend & form the arc shape around a cylinder with a vise

      I would LOVE to see a fully dimensioned flat drawing to bend, to do just that!
      We'll just need a FEW more dimensions, to draw it up.

      For reference, let's call the plate's "Width" the distance along the slot axis,
      and the plate's "Length" the distance along the writing axis.

      Questions:

      1) The Length is 8.75". I'm trying to calculate the overall plate "Width", and fold positions.
      Can you please measure:
      A) Each flat tab width (In pic 004 it LOOKS like 5/8", or 0.625"... Is that right?)
      B) The over "arc length", from fold to fold?

      2) In pic 004, the ruler the folded width looks more like 4-11/16 overall, or 4.8675". Is that right?
      (IOW, where is the 4.312 measurement?)

      3) May we assume the 2.360 height is to the TOP surface, from the table top?
      (I'm trying to account for plate thickness, to be as accurate as possible...)

      4) Holes:
      A) What are the hole diameters?
      B) What are the mounting hole center-center distances across, and along one edge?
      (Given the plate Width, I can calculate the offsets from that...)
      Or, please give us the hole offsets, measured from one corner.

      5) Gear slots:
      A) It LOOKS like each gear is supported at *roughly* a 120 degrees angle. Is that right?
      B) Is that the same for every gear?

      Would you be so kind as to give us a way to understand the "slot length" dimensions, too?
      One of these should be sufficient:
      C) Sufficient - heights from table to each slot number's endpoint
      (slot lengths can then be calculated with trig, given the above total height and width)
      D) Much Better - wrapped cloth-tape measurement length of each slot
      (That's the true flat plate length, for each one - I assume centered, so a list
      of each length by slot number would be sufficient.)

      6) Due to parallax in Pic 003, I can't QUITE make out the slot spacing and offset numbers,
      to position each slot correctly. Can you please tell us the measurements along the length?
      You said the slot width = .510" each
      A) What is the solid plate length on each end (before slot 32, and after slot 64)?
      B) What is the solid width of the little dividers, between each slot?

      I THINK that gives us all dimensions to make a darn close copy of the original cut flat plate...
      Have I missed anything?

      > I love the graphics of that era.
      > That would be an excellent final touch to add with a simple silkscreen template.

      Me too...
      What does it say in tiny print UNDER the "==Pick-A-Gear==" label? (Looks like "Atlas <mumble>")

      Can anyone think of an EASY way to recover the graphics for replication,
      short of flattening a good one? <shudder>

      The only thing I can think of is a bunch of camera shots, orbiting the PAG...

      Dan, would you be willing to help me recreate the graphic, with a bunch of
      accurately taken digital shots of it, at stepped angles?

      ONE Procedure I thought of would be:

      Create a 1.56" radius wooden dowel on your lathe.
      Lay the PAG over it (with the lathe off, of course... ;-)
      This allows you to accurately spin the PAG around its center of arc axis.
      Now tripod mount a digital camera level centered on it staring at the lathe axis centerline.
      (Conversely, mount a camera on a rotating arc-bar that does a sun-arc over the
      table orbiting the PAG arc centerline, to give the same effect...)

      If you then take a BUNCH of shots of it rotated every few degrees or so
      over the front 180 degrees (man, that's a lot of shots - the more the merrier!)
      and send them to me, I could then digitally stitch the "center slice" of each
      photo together with Photoshop to recreate some semblance of the original,
      "flattened" graphic as printed on the plate before it was bent.
      (To keep things straight, the pics names should include the arc angle it was taken at.)

      Due to keystone errors it'd need some manual redrawing over it, (this avoids
      having to take 180 1-degree shots of it... :-), but this makes it possible to
      recover the graphic without requiring any flattening of the valuable original PAG.
      I can use the edge line distortions to help guide my keystone error corrections,
      but the finer angle resolution shots you can bear to take, the easier it would be
      for me to fix the artwork without residual distortions.

      I'm assuming roughly 5 degree angle shots of it over the 180 should
      be sufficient resolution to accurately recreate the graphic.
      (To help, one can measure/calculate the circumference of the barrel,
      and divide the length appropriately with marks as a "rotation step reference".)

      But that's a lot of work, for the both of us.
      Does anyone have a BETTER way to accurately recover (or recreate) the graphic, for a flat plate?

      Thanks!
      - Keith Mc.
    • Keith Mc
      Actually, thinking about it, the graphic can probably be recovered with a lot less photos. I ll only need some fine step resolution shots of the FRONT label
      Message 2 of 8 , Apr 1, 2011
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        Actually, thinking about it, the graphic can probably be recovered with a lot less photos.

        I'll only need some fine step resolution shots of the FRONT label portion,
        Just give me a straight on shot of each text line, wherever the text and images
        are located directly in front of the camera.

        But once you get past the straight on shot of the "32" position,
        I can deal with much coarser pics (every 30-45 degrees or so), just
        to verify my back side graphic. Just make sure I have very clear
        0, 45, 90, 135, and 180 degree shots. (table level front =0, table level back upside down = 180)

        Whatever you take, please just be sure each shot has its viewing angle
        marked in its name, so I can sort them out.

        Adding in a few additional horizontal pass pics straight on at the "Atlas" script
        angle would be appreciated. It would help me eliminate logo keystone errors.

        Thanks!
        - Keith Mc.
      • Dan Buchanan
        Me too... What does it say in tiny print UNDER the ==Pick-A-Gear== label? (Looks like Atlas ) Can anyone think of an EASY way to recover the
        Message 3 of 8 , Apr 1, 2011
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          Me too...
          What does it say in tiny print UNDER the "==Pick-A-Gear==" label? (Looks like "Atlas <mumble>")

          Can anyone think of an EASY way to recover the graphics for replication, short of flattening a good one? <shudder>
          <snips>

          "Atlas Press Co.  Kalamazoo, Mich. U.S.A."


          I might be able to put it on a CMM and trace it into a drawing.

          Graphics can probably be shot 1:1 or recovered from other literature; catalogs, etc.


          That font looks very familiar.



          Time is all it will take, really....
          -Dan


          __,__,___

















          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Keith Mc
          ... Cool. Even without the graphics, if you can t get access to a good CMM, whenever you do get a chance please just let me know the other dimensions I
          Message 4 of 8 , Apr 1, 2011
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            > Keith Mc. wrote:
            > > Me too...
            > > What does it say in tiny print UNDER the "==Pick-A-Gear==" label? (Looks like "Atlas <mumble>")
            > > Can anyone think of an EASY way to recover the graphics for replication, short of flattening
            > a good one? <shudder> <snips>

            On Apr 1, 2011, Dan Buchanan wrote:
            > "Atlas Press Co. Kalamazoo, Mich. U.S.A."
            > I might be able to put it on a CMM and trace it into a drawing.
            > Graphics can probably be shot 1:1 or recovered from other literature; catalogs, etc.
            > That font looks very familiar.
            > Time is all it will take, really....

            Cool.

            Even without the graphics, if you can't get access to a good CMM, whenever
            you do get a chance please just let me know the other dimensions I mentioned.
            I can use them to take a first crack at whipping up at least a crude starter flat
            plate drawing, that we can all then review and refine.

            We can worry about adding the logo graphics overlay to it later.

            Thanks!
            - Keith Mc.
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