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QCTP Story

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  • L. Garlinghouse
    Atlas_Craftsman Metal Working MachinesOK, I went out and bought a CDCO QCTP and finally made some chips with it. Seems like a good move. I noticed that mine
    Message 1 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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      Atlas_Craftsman Metal Working MachinesOK, I went out and bought a CDCO QCTP and finally made some chips with it. Seems like a good move.

      I noticed that mine has two holes that were not making sense and that I don't recall seeing discussed within our group. One a threaded blind hole (3/16"-18tpi) on a vertical side opposite one of the dovetails and the other a blind hole (unthreaded 0.390 dia) on the bottom. At first I figured the blind hole in the bottom to be some sort of tooling hole, i.e. something used in the manufacture of the piece, not something of use to the end-user.

      As I am using this on my Atlas 10" TH42 I quickly discovered that the humped compound did not allow much rotation of the QCTP. Soooo I got a piece of 3/16" mat'l. and made a spacer that would allow the bottom of the QCTP to rotate a full 360 degrees. On principle I carefully located the 9/16" dia. for the hold down screw such that the rounded edge of the plate contacted the vertical surface of the hump so that the spacer plate would not be free to rotate.

      OK, very pleased with myself at this point . . . BUT . . . Maybe I might want to make sure I could control the amount of rotation. Ahhhh!! That is what the blind hole is for -- a detent!! So I scribed a circle on my spacer plate with the center of the holddown bolt hole as center and a radius equal to the distance from said center to the center of the blind hole and then went to MHB (20th edition) page 75, length of chords for spacing off divisions on a circle, and stepped off my 12 divisions. I was planning on 24 divisions [15 degree increments] but I had to settle for half that, 12 divisions, 30 degree increments because of real estate problems. I then drilled and counter sunk each of the points.

      Now, I sez to myself, just get a 9mm diameter ball or even a 3/8" diameter ball, a spring and I should have a working detent. But I don't know yet. Nobody seems to be selling loose ball-bearing balls anymore. I may end up making a pointed plunger. I may have to connect the countersinks with a groove to smooth out the movement of the ball from hole to hole, but that is easily put off until I get a ball.

      Anyway, I think I know what the blind hole on the bottom is for and the threaded hole on the side is for a handle to rotate the QCTP to where ever.

      Obviously the hot setup is to layout all the hole centers before you drill any holes, and leave enough extra material somewhere on the spacer plate to allow some means of keeping the plate from moving at all when the toolpost is rotated. Maybe bend down some ears on the sides to fit over the ends of the T-slot on the compound. Lots of possibilities.

      So, this wholeQCTP thing is becoming a whole project in and of itself.

      I was surprised that the side hole was a SAE thread. I figured it would be a M10, but it was not. Most inscrutable these Chinese and their QCTP.

      Later,

      L.H. Garlinghouse
      Arkansas USA

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Russ Kepler
      ... I m pretty sure the threaded hole in the side is an indicator mounting point. At least that s what I was told some time ago.
      Message 2 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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        On Tuesday 01 March 2011 07:35:18 L. Garlinghouse wrote:

        > Anyway, I think I know what the blind hole on the bottom is for and the
        > threaded hole on the side is for a handle to rotate the QCTP to where ever.

        I'm pretty sure the threaded hole in the side is an indicator mounting point.
        At least that's what I was told some time ago.
      • William Abernathy
        See http://www.reidsupply.com/Results.aspx?pid=10022353 for a range of caged, sprung ball inserts. I imagine McMaster and MSC sell these as well, and Enco is
        Message 3 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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          See http://www.reidsupply.com/Results.aspx?pid=10022353 for a range of caged,
          sprung ball inserts. I imagine McMaster and MSC sell these as well, and Enco is
          worth a look-over for this component as well.

          --William A.

          L. Garlinghouse wrote:
          > Atlas_Craftsman Metal Working MachinesOK, I went out and bought a CDCO QCTP
          > and finally made some chips with it. Seems like a good move.
          >
          > I noticed that mine has two holes that were not making sense and that I don't
          > recall seeing discussed within our group. One a threaded blind hole
          > (3/16"-18tpi) on a vertical side opposite one of the dovetails and the other
          > a blind hole (unthreaded 0.390 dia) on the bottom. At first I figured the
          > blind hole in the bottom to be some sort of tooling hole, i.e. something used
          > in the manufacture of the piece, not something of use to the end-user.
          >
          > As I am using this on my Atlas 10" TH42 I quickly discovered that the humped
          > compound did not allow much rotation of the QCTP. Soooo I got a piece of
          > 3/16" mat'l. and made a spacer that would allow the bottom of the QCTP to
          > rotate a full 360 degrees. On principle I carefully located the 9/16" dia.
          > for the hold down screw such that the rounded edge of the plate contacted the
          > vertical surface of the hump so that the spacer plate would not be free to
          > rotate.
          >
          > OK, very pleased with myself at this point . . . BUT . . . Maybe I might want
          > to make sure I could control the amount of rotation. Ahhhh!! That is what
          > the blind hole is for -- a detent!! So I scribed a circle on my spacer plate
          > with the center of the holddown bolt hole as center and a radius equal to the
          > distance from said center to the center of the blind hole and then went to
          > MHB (20th edition) page 75, length of chords for spacing off divisions on a
          > circle, and stepped off my 12 divisions. I was planning on 24 divisions [15
          > degree increments] but I had to settle for half that, 12 divisions, 30 degree
          > increments because of real estate problems. I then drilled and counter sunk
          > each of the points.
          >
          > Now, I sez to myself, just get a 9mm diameter ball or even a 3/8" diameter
          > ball, a spring and I should have a working detent. But I don't know yet.
          > Nobody seems to be selling loose ball-bearing balls anymore. I may end up
          > making a pointed plunger. I may have to connect the countersinks with a
          > groove to smooth out the movement of the ball from hole to hole, but that is
          > easily put off until I get a ball.
          >
          > Anyway, I think I know what the blind hole on the bottom is for and the
          > threaded hole on the side is for a handle to rotate the QCTP to where ever.
          >
          > Obviously the hot setup is to layout all the hole centers before you drill
          > any holes, and leave enough extra material somewhere on the spacer plate to
          > allow some means of keeping the plate from moving at all when the toolpost is
          > rotated. Maybe bend down some ears on the sides to fit over the ends of the
          > T-slot on the compound. Lots of possibilities.
          >
          > So, this wholeQCTP thing is becoming a whole project in and of itself.
          >
          > I was surprised that the side hole was a SAE thread. I figured it would be a
          > M10, but it was not. Most inscrutable these Chinese and their QCTP.
          >
          > Later,
          >
          > L.H. Garlinghouse Arkansas USA
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]


          --
          William Abernathy
          Berkeley, CA
          http://yourwritereditor.com
        • Bruce Freeman
          http://www.mcmaster.com/#steel-balls/=b8u5cu http://www.smallparts.com/b/16414151/ref=sp_iss_16414151 for loose steel balls I d pull apart a ball bearing
          Message 4 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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            http://www.mcmaster.com/#steel-balls/=b8u5cu
            http://www.smallparts.com/b/16414151/ref=sp_iss_16414151
            for loose steel balls

            I'd pull apart a ball bearing first, though. Shipping can kill you on these
            things. Sears hardware stores sell cheap ball bearings for a buck or two.

            On Tue, Mar 1, 2011 at 11:00 AM, William Abernathy <william@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > See http://www.reidsupply.com/Results.aspx?pid=10022353 for a range of
            > caged,
            > sprung ball inserts. I imagine McMaster and MSC sell these as well, and
            > Enco is
            > worth a look-over for this component as well.
            >
            > --William A.
            >
            >
            > L. Garlinghouse wrote:
            > > Atlas_Craftsman Metal Working MachinesOK, I went out and bought a CDCO
            > QCTP
            > > and finally made some chips with it. Seems like a good move.
            > >
            > > I noticed that mine has two holes that were not making sense and that I
            > don't
            > > recall seeing discussed within our group. One a threaded blind hole
            > > (3/16"-18tpi) on a vertical side opposite one of the dovetails and the
            > other
            > > a blind hole (unthreaded 0.390 dia) on the bottom. At first I figured the
            > > blind hole in the bottom to be some sort of tooling hole, i.e. something
            > used
            > > in the manufacture of the piece, not something of use to the end-user.
            > >
            > > As I am using this on my Atlas 10" TH42 I quickly discovered that the
            > humped
            > > compound did not allow much rotation of the QCTP. Soooo I got a piece of
            > > 3/16" mat'l. and made a spacer that would allow the bottom of the QCTP to
            > > rotate a full 360 degrees. On principle I carefully located the 9/16"
            > dia.
            > > for the hold down screw such that the rounded edge of the plate contacted
            > the
            > > vertical surface of the hump so that the spacer plate would not be free
            > to
            > > rotate.
            > >
            > > OK, very pleased with myself at this point . . . BUT . . . Maybe I might
            > want
            > > to make sure I could control the amount of rotation. Ahhhh!! That is what
            > > the blind hole is for -- a detent!! So I scribed a circle on my spacer
            > plate
            > > with the center of the holddown bolt hole as center and a radius equal to
            > the
            > > distance from said center to the center of the blind hole and then went
            > to
            > > MHB (20th edition) page 75, length of chords for spacing off divisions on
            > a
            > > circle, and stepped off my 12 divisions. I was planning on 24 divisions
            > [15
            > > degree increments] but I had to settle for half that, 12 divisions, 30
            > degree
            > > increments because of real estate problems. I then drilled and counter
            > sunk
            > > each of the points.
            > >
            > > Now, I sez to myself, just get a 9mm diameter ball or even a 3/8"
            > diameter
            > > ball, a spring and I should have a working detent. But I don't know yet.
            > > Nobody seems to be selling loose ball-bearing balls anymore. I may end up
            > > making a pointed plunger. I may have to connect the countersinks with a
            > > groove to smooth out the movement of the ball from hole to hole, but that
            > is
            > > easily put off until I get a ball.
            > >
            > > Anyway, I think I know what the blind hole on the bottom is for and the
            > > threaded hole on the side is for a handle to rotate the QCTP to where
            > ever.
            > >
            > > Obviously the hot setup is to layout all the hole centers before you
            > drill
            > > any holes, and leave enough extra material somewhere on the spacer plate
            > to
            > > allow some means of keeping the plate from moving at all when the
            > toolpost is
            > > rotated. Maybe bend down some ears on the sides to fit over the ends of
            > the
            > > T-slot on the compound. Lots of possibilities.
            > >
            > > So, this wholeQCTP thing is becoming a whole project in and of itself.
            > >
            > > I was surprised that the side hole was a SAE thread. I figured it would
            > be a
            > > M10, but it was not. Most inscrutable these Chinese and their QCTP.
            > >
            > > Later,
            > >
            > > L.H. Garlinghouse Arkansas USA
            > >
            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            > --
            > William Abernathy
            > Berkeley, CA
            > http://yourwritereditor.com
            >
            >



            --
            Bruce
            NJ


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Richard Marchi
            I also recently bought a CDCO AXA tool post, so I appreciated the thread about mounting it on a TH-42. I haven t got to trying to mount it yet, but wondered if
            Message 5 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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              I also recently bought a CDCO AXA tool post, so I appreciated the thread about mounting it on a TH-42. I haven't got to trying to mount it yet, but wondered if anyone tried milling a flat on the compound hump? I'd think that all the cutting forces trying to rock the tool post would be carried by the thinner ends of the slot, so it shouldn't matter that the excess thickness of the hump would make it any less rigid than it already is. Thoughts...?

              Thanks in advance

              Dick





              Washington, DC



              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • mertnedp
              Well, it is made of cast iron. The area is only about .150 thick. You only need to mill off about an area of 1/2 or so. to clear the corner of the tool post.
              Message 6 of 10 , Mar 1, 2011
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                Well, it is made of cast iron. The area is only about .150" thick. You only need to mill off about an area of 1/2" or so. to clear the corner of the tool post. Mine was broken and repaired in the T-slot area. I decided to make a new one that was flat and of steel. I retired the original to the spare parts area.

                --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Richard Marchi <rfmarchi@...> wrote:
                >
                > I also recently bought a CDCO AXA tool post, so I appreciated the thread about mounting it on a TH-42. I haven't got to trying to mount it yet, but wondered if anyone tried milling a flat on the compound hump? I'd think that all the cutting forces trying to rock the tool post would be carried by the thinner ends of the slot, so it shouldn't matter that the excess thickness of the hump would make it any less rigid than it already is. Thoughts...?
                >
                > Thanks in advance
                >
                > Dick
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Washington, DC
                >
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                >
              • harpanet13
                but wondered if anyone tried milling a flat on the compound hump? I d think that all the cutting forces trying to rock the tool post would be carried by the
                Message 7 of 10 , Mar 2, 2011
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                  but wondered if anyone tried milling a flat on the compound hump? I'd think that all the cutting forces trying to rock the tool post would be carried by the thinner ends of the slot, so it shouldn't matter that the excess thickness of the hump would make it any less rigid than it already is. Thoughts...?
                  >
                  That's what I did with mine . I "milled" a flat area with a small angle grinder so the corner could just swing through the arc. Didn't seem to have any ill effect.

                  Wayne
                • Cindy & Wayne Burner
                  Despite the majority of members that will say no, I milled the hump off of mine when I first got my AXA, and have had no problems, or regrets since doing so. I
                  Message 8 of 10 , Mar 2, 2011
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                    Despite the majority of members that will say no, I milled the hump
                    off of mine when I first got my AXA, and have had no problems, or
                    regrets since doing so. I was so afraid that it was going to break, I
                    had bought an extra casting to perform the surgery on, just in case
                    the original exploded like I was led to believe. No regrets, and the
                    holder can rotate 360 degrees.

                    Wayne(rice)Burner
                    The maple sap buckets are on the trees
                    The first true sign, that warmer weather is coming, here in NH
                  • mertnedp
                    I would of ground mine if it was not already broken but making the new one was good for a winter project. Yes the buckets are on in this area as well!!!
                    Message 9 of 10 , Mar 2, 2011
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                      I would of ground mine if it was not already broken but making the new one was good for a winter project.

                      Yes the buckets are on in this area as well!!!

                      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Cindy & Wayne Burner <burners4@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Despite the majority of members that will say no, I milled the hump
                      > off of mine when I first got my AXA, and have had no problems, or
                      > regrets since doing so. I was so afraid that it was going to break, I
                      > had bought an extra casting to perform the surgery on, just in case
                      > the original exploded like I was led to believe. No regrets, and the
                      > holder can rotate 360 degrees.
                      >
                      > Wayne(rice)Burner
                      > The maple sap buckets are on the trees
                      > The first true sign, that warmer weather is coming, here in NH
                      >
                    • jworman
                      ... I was a bit cowardly. I found one already modified on Ebay, so I bought it. My AXA will swing 360° now. No problems in the last 3 years.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Mar 3, 2011
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                        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Cindy & Wayne Burner <burners4@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Despite the majority of members that will say no, I milled the hump
                        > off of mine when I first got my AXA, and have had no problems, or
                        > regrets since doing so. I was so afraid that it was going to break, I
                        > had bought an extra casting to perform the surgery on, just in case
                        > the original exploded like I was led to believe. No regrets, and the
                        > holder can rotate 360 degrees.
                        >
                        > Wayne(rice)Burner
                        > The maple sap buckets are on the trees
                        > The first true sign, that warmer weather is coming, here in NH
                        >
                        I was a bit cowardly. I found one already modified on Ebay, so I bought it. My AXA will swing 360° now. No problems in the last 3 years.
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