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RE: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?

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  • Ron Gerlach
    Robert I have a similar dilema. In my case it is the inside wall of a low pressure hydraulic cylinder that holds up my Kalamazoo horizontal bandsaw. It had
    Message 1 of 19 , Aug 3, 2010
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      Robert

      I have a similar dilema. In my case it is the inside wall of a low pressure hydraulic cylinder that holds up my Kalamazoo horizontal bandsaw. It had been out in the weather for some time before I bought it. Water had gotten into the cylinder and now there is pitting in the internal tube wall. My plan is to use a small cylinder hone and try and take off .002 to .005 and see how it looks. I have .063 wall thickness so I have room for material removal. I can then adjust the size of the piston seal as needed.

      RonG

      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      From: patrosurinternet@...
      Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 21:43:27 +0000
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?




























      Hello From Qu�bec!!!



      I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.



      I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ?



      Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions.



      Regards



      Robert Patoine


















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    • Dan Buchanan
      I hate those scrathes. They drives me crazy. Expandable cylinder hone, like Bill said, was what I was thinking. I used one to polish out the cylinder on my
      Message 2 of 19 , Aug 3, 2010
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        I hate those scrathes. They drives me crazy.
        Expandable cylinder hone, like Bill said, was what I was thinking.
        I used one to polish out the cylinder on my Craftsman 101.22950  to clean it up and get it working again. No parts available and no optional substitutes without serious mod to the saw, so honing the cylinder did the job. New seals, etc, of course.
        -Dan


        --- On Tue, 8/3/10, Bill Stietenroth <k5zty@...> wrote:

        From: Bill Stietenroth <k5zty@...>
        Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, August 3, 2010, 4:16 PM

        A little more detail about the cylinder and the scratch would be helpful but in general, if you are talking about the inside wall of the cylinder that the ram seals run on, that surface has to have a very fine finish and boring it with a lathe tool is not sufficient. If the scratch is small and shallow, you may be able to hone out it with an expansion type cylinder hone. If it is a large and deep scratch, it is probably going to take an internal grinding machine to re surface the cylinder wall properly.

        Bill

        ---------- Original Message ----------
        From: "tannant" <patrosurinternet@...>
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?
        Date: Tue, 03 Aug 2010 21:43:27 -0000

        Hello From Québec!!!

        I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.

        I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ?

        Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions.

        Regards



        Robert Patoine



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      • Dan Buchanan
        Excellent information in that link, Ron! ... From: Ron Gerlach Subject: RE: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ? To:
        Message 3 of 19 , Aug 3, 2010
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          Excellent information in that link, Ron!

          --- On Tue, 8/3/10, Ron Gerlach <r7734g@...> wrote:

          From: Ron Gerlach <r7734g@...>
          Subject: RE: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, August 3, 2010, 4:38 PM


          See link for discussion of this topic:

          http://www.maintenanceresources.com/referencelibrary/ezine/caseyhyd2.html


          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          From: patrosurinternet@...
          Date: Tue, 3 Aug 2010 21:43:27 +0000
          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?






















           


             
               
               
                Hello From Québec!!!



          I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.



          I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ?



          Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions.



          Regards



          Robert Patoine






             
               

             
             






                                      
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        • L. Garlinghouse
          ... I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ? Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions. ... Some thoughts, if it
          Message 4 of 19 , Aug 3, 2010
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            Robert writes:

            > Hello From Québec!!! I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.
            I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ? Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions.
            > Regards
            > Robert Patoine
            -----------------------------

            Some thoughts, if it were my problem:

            One thing, is it your personal cylinder or someone else's that you are charging to repair? Does anyone's life or limbs come into danger if the cylinder is not quite right? What is the diameter of the cylinder? What pressure does it operate at? My concern is if it leaks how important is it? Is someone going to be hurt by a high pressure leak? or is it going to be a messy nuisance that can be tolerated? How long is the cylinder and how accessible is the scratch?

            OK, let's assume it is not too big, say 4" and total length is maybe 12" and that it is your cylinder and you are trying to salvage it and its application is not life endangering. You want to save some money, learn something and not throw something away if it is salvagable.

            I aggree that boring it on your lathe is conceivable but you will have to end up honing it anyway and if you bore it enough you will have to either go to an oversize piston or rely on a seal working at its limits. So boring it on your lathe probably is not something you want to do. The setup itself is pretty tricky.

            Also what is the sealing design? Some seals are pretty robust and tolerant of some wear and tear. Maybe just removing any sharp edges and replacing the O-rings or the cheveron seal is all that is required. You might consider honing the sharp edges off the scratch and then filling the scratch with solder, or silver solder or even try J-B weld or some other epoxy and then honing it again. I've even seen cylinders repaired like a dentist does a filling -- mixing silver with mercury, pushing it into the voids [in this case a porous weld] and then when the mercury evaporates the silver is left in place. This was not a hydraulic cylinder but an aluminum one for I don't know what.

            If it were my cylinder operating at low pressures and a failure or leak would not be serious, that is what I would do. If it is a cheap cylinder, replacing it might be something to consider if its intended use was critical.

            Some thoughts. Follow my counsel at your own risk.

            Later,

            L.H. Garlinghouse
            Arkansas USA

            >


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            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • carvel webb
            If this was a motor bike barrel ( which it isn t ) there would be 3 options- Use a hone to polish out the scratch if it is minor. Bore to oversize ( if the
            Message 5 of 19 , Aug 3, 2010
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              If this was a motor bike barrel ( which it isn't ) there would be 3 options-

              Use a hone to polish out the scratch if it is minor.

              Bore to oversize ( if the oversize piston / plunger whatever is available or
              make one ) and hone to finish.

              If badly gouged or pitted , then bore out completely and fit a sleeve of the
              right size.

              Boring on the Atlas can be done but requires a bit of careful setting up.

              Best in my experience is to clamp the cylinder on the saddle and run an
              adjustable boring bar between centres - presuming that the cylinder is open
              ended of course :). It helps if you have the boring table accessory which
              clamps to the saddle in place of the compound :)

              Boring must be finished off by medium and fine honing to get an appropriate
              finish

              If the piston that is running in it has rings , then a fine but not
              perfectly smooth finish is needed to allow the ring(s) to bed in

              If it is sealed with O rings or the like , then one needs it as smooth as
              possible

              If you haven't done this before , then suggest practice on something else
              first , or farm it out - you wouldn't want to total an irreplaceable part as
              part of the learning curve !

              Good luck,

              Carvel

              -----Original Message-----
              From: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
              [mailto:atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of tannant
              Sent: 03 August 2010 11:43 PM
              To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?

              Hello From Québec!!!

              I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.

              I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ?

              Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any
              suggestions.

              Regards



              Robert Patoine



              ------------------------------------

              TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
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              Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
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              To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
              http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/

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              http://pico-systems.com/cgi-bin/Atlas-wiki/Atlas.cgi
              Please submit things you think will be useful to Jon Elson at
              mailto://elson@...! Groups Links
            • tannant
              Wow, Thanks for all the answers. Indeed, I would like to repair it by myself. It is the right leg of a small Kioti Backoo. Reading your comments and being also
              Message 6 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                Wow,
                Thanks for all the answers.
                Indeed, I would like to repair it by myself. It is the right leg of a
                small Kioti Backoo.
                Reading your comments and being also a woodworker, I have the habit to
                repair and hone my tools.
                As I understand I can use the same process to repair the scratch.
                I also think of the silver solder, but was not sure if this was
                acceptable.
                I also think at the epoxy solution but find it a little ridiculous!
                Thanks to you, I was not!

                I will challenge it and try to not get it worse than it is. Otherwise I
                will have to buy another one and it is costly,
                I have an old chuck absorber and I will practice on it.
                I will take photos and keep you inform.
                Thanks again to all of you for you concern and reply, Again accept my
                apologies for my English.


                Regards

                Robert Patoine



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Bruce Freeman
                A minor correction to the chemistry here. The mercury never evaporates from amalgam, but is an integral part of it. See
                Message 7 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                  A minor correction to the chemistry here. The mercury never evaporates from
                  amalgam, but is an integral part of it. See
                  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalgam_%28dentistry%29

                  If you do not know how to handle mercury safely, then don't.

                  The J-B Weld sounds like a great idea to me. I'd be interested whether it
                  works in this case.

                  On Tue, Aug 3, 2010 at 10:53 PM, L. Garlinghouse <lhghouse@...>wrote:

                  >
                  >
                  <large snip>

                  > You might consider honing the sharp edges off the scratch and then
                  > filling the scratch with solder, or silver solder or even try J-B weld or
                  > some other epoxy and then honing it again. I've even seen cylinders repaired
                  > like a dentist does a filling -- mixing silver with mercury, pushing it into
                  > the voids [in this case a porous weld] and then when the mercury evaporates
                  > the silver is left in place.
                  >
                  > <snip>
                  >
                  > L.H. Garlinghouse
                  > Arkansas USA
                  >

                  --
                  Bruce
                  NJ


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • L. Garlinghouse
                  I ll stand corrected on my misunderstanding of dental metalurgy/chemistry. Thanks. I wasn t exactly sure where the mercury went after everything got soft and
                  Message 8 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                    I'll stand corrected on my misunderstanding of dental metalurgy/chemistry. Thanks. I wasn't exactly sure where the mercury went after everything got soft and squishy.

                    As an aside, the silver and mercury void filling was done on some aluminum cylinders [about 12" diam x 10" long] that had the blind end welded in and the weld had to pass x-ray testing. This was in the mid-60s and the cylinders were not hydraulic or pneumatic but did have a piston that accomplished something but I'm not sure we were supposed to even know what that was. The job had gone really sour and I think this was an act of desperation. As a lowly drill press operator I was not supposed to know that either, but I somehow "sensed" that much from watching the management get red in the face and popping tranquilizers.

                    Later,
                    L.H.
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Bruce Freeman
                    To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 8:48 AM
                    Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?



                    A minor correction to the chemistry here. The mercury never evaporates from
                    amalgam, but is an integral part of it. See
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalgam_%28dentistry%29

                    If you do not know how to handle mercury safely, then don't.

                    The J-B Weld sounds like a great idea to me. I'd be interested whether it
                    works in this case.

                    On Tue, Aug 3, 2010 at 10:53 PM, L. Garlinghouse <lhghouse@...>wrote:

                    >
                    >
                    <large snip>

                    > You might consider honing the sharp edges off the scratch and then
                    > filling the scratch with solder, or silver solder or even try J-B weld or
                    > some other epoxy and then honing it again. I've even seen cylinders repaired
                    > like a dentist does a filling -- mixing silver with mercury, pushing it into
                    > the voids [in this case a porous weld] and then when the mercury evaporates
                    > the silver is left in place.
                    >
                    > <snip>
                    >
                    > L.H. Garlinghouse
                    > Arkansas USA
                    >

                    --
                    Bruce
                    NJ

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Jim aand Rose
                    I know for a fact that Devcon steel was used by my father in law over twenty years ago to repair the cylinder on his ram for his hydraulic press, its still
                    Message 9 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                      I know for a fact that Devcon steel was used by my father in law over twenty years ago to repair the cylinder on his ram for his hydraulic press, its still works to this day.


                      From: Bruce Freeman
                      Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 6:48 AM
                      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?



                      A minor correction to the chemistry here. The mercury never evaporates from
                      amalgam, but is an integral part of it. See
                      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amalgam_%28dentistry%29

                      If you do not know how to handle mercury safely, then don't.

                      The J-B Weld sounds like a great idea to me. I'd be interested whether it
                      works in this case.

                      On Tue, Aug 3, 2010 at 10:53 PM, L. Garlinghouse <lhghouse@...>wrote:

                      >
                      >
                      <large snip>

                      > You might consider honing the sharp edges off the scratch and then
                      > filling the scratch with solder, or silver solder or even try J-B weld or
                      > some other epoxy and then honing it again. I've even seen cylinders repaired
                      > like a dentist does a filling -- mixing silver with mercury, pushing it into
                      > the voids [in this case a porous weld] and then when the mercury evaporates
                      > the silver is left in place.
                      >
                      > <snip>
                      >
                      > L.H. Garlinghouse
                      > Arkansas USA
                      >

                      --
                      Bruce
                      NJ

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • outlawmws
                      If he scratch is light, honing will usually do the job. If it is deep, or more of a gouge, lightly hone to remove the sharp edges, and then use JB weld. This
                      Message 10 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                        If he scratch is light, honing will usually do the job.

                        If it is deep, or more of a gouge, lightly hone to remove the sharp edges, and then use JB weld. This is a common repair for motorcycle forks and as one other responder said, he has seen a hydraulic press repared this way.

                        Get the JB weld into the scratch and scrape smooth before it dries, if needed,do a second coat. Then hone smooth. The nice part of JB weld is it is machineable.

                        -Outlaw

                        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "tannant" <patrosurinternet@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Wow,
                        > Thanks for all the answers.
                        > Indeed, I would like to repair it by myself. It is the right leg of a
                        > small Kioti Backoo.
                        > Reading your comments and being also a woodworker, I have the habit to
                        > repair and hone my tools.
                        > As I understand I can use the same process to repair the scratch.
                        > I also think of the silver solder, but was not sure if this was
                        > acceptable.
                        > I also think at the epoxy solution but find it a little ridiculous!
                        > Thanks to you, I was not!
                        >
                        > I will challenge it and try to not get it worse than it is. Otherwise I
                        > will have to buy another one and it is costly,
                        > I have an old chuck absorber and I will practice on it.
                        > I will take photos and keep you inform.
                        > Thanks again to all of you for you concern and reply, Again accept my
                        > apologies for my English.
                        >
                        >
                        > Regards
                        >
                        > Robert Patoine
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        >
                      • jo barden
                        When I was a Fitter on the railway if we had a brake cylinder (normally 16 diameter) with a score we would clean with emery cloth then put in a vice put
                        Message 11 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                          When I was a Fitter on the railway if we had a brake cylinder (normally 16" diameter) with a score we would clean with emery cloth then put in a vice put solder paint in score and heat, the solder would melt and fill score, then new piston seal quick test and back in stores for latter use, this was Saturday "job and knock" work but these repairs worked and saved welding and re-boring at main works.

                          Jon

                          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                          From: outlawmws@...
                          Date: Wed, 4 Aug 2010 18:25:28 +0000
                          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?




























                          If he scratch is light, honing will usually do the job.



                          If it is deep, or more of a gouge, lightly hone to remove the sharp edges, and then use JB weld. This is a common repair for motorcycle forks and as one other responder said, he has seen a hydraulic press repared this way.



                          Get the JB weld into the scratch and scrape smooth before it dries, if needed,do a second coat. Then hone smooth. The nice part of JB weld is it is machineable.



                          -Outlaw



                          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "tannant" <patrosurinternet@...> wrote:

                          >

                          >

                          > Wow,

                          > Thanks for all the answers.

                          > Indeed, I would like to repair it by myself. It is the right leg of a

                          > small Kioti Backoo.

                          > Reading your comments and being also a woodworker, I have the habit to

                          > repair and hone my tools.

                          > As I understand I can use the same process to repair the scratch.

                          > I also think of the silver solder, but was not sure if this was

                          > acceptable.

                          > I also think at the epoxy solution but find it a little ridiculous!

                          > Thanks to you, I was not!

                          >

                          > I will challenge it and try to not get it worse than it is. Otherwise I

                          > will have to buy another one and it is costly,

                          > I have an old chuck absorber and I will practice on it.

                          > I will take photos and keep you inform.

                          > Thanks again to all of you for you concern and reply, Again accept my

                          > apologies for my English.

                          >

                          >

                          > Regards

                          >

                          > Robert Patoine

                          >

                          >

                          >

                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                          >



















                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • jworman
                          ... Funny this comes up. Just two weeks ago a buddy came over with the hydraulic cylinder out of the pusher blade on his backhoe. Some time ago a bolt came
                          Message 12 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "tannant" <patrosurinternet@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Hello From Québec!!!
                            >
                            > I have an hydraulic cylinder on witch there is a scrath.
                            >
                            > I wonder If I can turn it with my TH2 ?
                            >
                            > Is there any dicussion regarding the methods to do that or do you have any suggestions.
                            >
                            > Regards
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > Robert Patoine
                            >
                            Funny this comes up. Just two weeks ago a buddy came over with the hydraulic cylinder out of the pusher blade on his backhoe. Some time ago a bolt came loose and stuck out. When the cylinder hit it it put a real dinge from the outside into the inside. The cylinder has about a 2.5 inch bore.

                            He got some of it out, but there was still a noticeable bump down toward the end. It was far too far to try to turn. The bump put a real nick in the original piston. My friend made a new piston, a bit smaller to clear the bump, but often the pressure would blow the 'O' ring out and he would have to stop and replace it.

                            We made a swedge out of a piece of steel on the lathe that was a bit of an interference fit for the bad spot. We welded a nut on the far side in the middle of the swedge. We hammered it down to the end of the cylinder, then threaded a slide hammer on the nut and hammered it back out. There was now less of a bump, but still some. Then we made a shim out of a beer can that wrapped 1/3 around the opposite side, then we hammered it in again. When we had the swedge over the bad spot, we hammered on the outside of the cylinder. We were able to get 2 beer can shims in, but not 3. When we finished there was almost no noticeable bump. We turned a new piston that matched the original.

                            He has been using it quite a bit for the last two weeks and considers the repair a complete success.

                            As your problem is completely different, this is probably no help, but there may be an idea in there.
                          • tannant
                            So, I did it and it works.First I use a brunisher that I normally use to sharpen woodworker blade. Then I delicately pass it over and over the scratch. I sand
                            Message 13 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
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                              So, I did it and it works.First I use a brunisher that I normally use to
                              sharpen woodworker blade.
                              Then I delicately pass it over and over the scratch. I sand the
                              resulting operation.
                              I mix the Loctite ™ Metal Magic Steel and apply it over the scratch.
                              Wait 3 minutes and with the same burnisher I remove the surplus. After
                              10 minutes I sand the repair.
                              The problem is that the scratch grooved the inside of the retaining
                              collet.
                              I fix the entire part in the lathe, sand the collet and apply the
                              Loctite ™ again.
                              Finally I sand it on the lathe, clean everything and install the
                              cylinder to my tractor.It took me about 1 hour and half do to so.
                              I can't add pictures today so here are some links
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/1.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/3.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/4.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/5.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/6.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/7.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/8.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/9.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/10.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/11.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/12.jpg <http://www.r.lpmm.ca/scratch/2.jpg>
                              Again, thanks to all of you for your kindly answer

                              Robert Patoine







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                            • L. Garlinghouse
                              Glad that you successfully repaired your hydraulic cylinder. Technical names get strange especially moving from one language to another [or even one region to
                              Message 14 of 19 , Aug 4, 2010
                              • 0 Attachment
                                Glad that you successfully repaired your hydraulic cylinder.

                                Technical names get strange especially moving from one language to another [or even one region to another that is supposed to speak the same language]. From the pictures it looks like the scratch was in the cylinder rod. Calling the rod a cylinder actually makes more sense because it is cylindrical and more correctly the other part might be called a "tube" or a "barrel" but in American English is not. So most of us were helping you to fix the bore of the cylinder tube and not the rod. Still it looks like there was a happy ending.

                                Amazing what you can learn on a simple lathe discussion list.

                                Later,

                                L.H. Garlinghouse
                                Arkansas USA

                                ----- Original Message -----
                                From: tannant
                                To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                Sent: Wednesday, August 04, 2010 7:27 PM
                                Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Hydraukic cylinder scratch repair ?



                                So, I did it and it works.First I use a brunisher that I normally use to
                                sharpen woodworker blade.
                                Then I delicately pass it over and over the scratch. I sand the
                                resulting operation.
                                I mix the Loctite T Metal Magic Steel and apply it over the scratch.
                                Wait 3 minutes and with the same burnisher I remove the surplus. After
                                10 minutes I sand the repair.
                                The problem is that the scratch grooved the inside of the retaining
                                collet.
                                I fix the entire part in the lathe, sand the collet and apply the
                                Loctite T again.
                                Finally I sand it on the lathe, clean everything and install the
                                cylinder to my tractor.It took me about 1 hour and half do to so.
                                I can't add pictures today so here are some links


                                <<snipp, snipp >>


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