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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Introduction and a couple of questions

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  • William Abernathy
    ... #3 MT (short) works fine in the headstock. Get a soft one, so you can recut it as needed. ... Yes. I ve rented a couple of welding videos from them. They
    Message 1 of 6 , Oct 8, 2009
      dwaynekleck wrote:

      > What size dead center do I need for the head stock? I see
      > there are long and short Morse tapers in the table. My Jacob's chuck and live
      > center for the tail stock are clearly marked #2.

      #3 MT (short) works fine in the headstock. Get a soft one, so you can recut it
      as needed.

      > Question 2 has anyone rented
      > movies from http://smartflix.com/ ? If so how was the experience and did you
      > find some great and some not so great?

      Yes. I've rented a couple of welding videos from them. They deliver promptly, as
      promised. There was no problem with their service. My only complaint was that I
      didn't read the fine print on one of their DVDs. Turned out I was watching the
      first of a 2-part series, and all I saw was the safety checks and setup stuff,
      and none of the desired white-hot metal-on-metal welding action. I was
      disappointed, but it's not their fault I'm too dumb to read what's printed there
      on the screen.

      Good luck with your T.

      --William
    • Michael Fagan
      The Atlas 12 machines take a standard #3 in the headstock and #2 in the tailstock. Contrary to William s advice, I would get a hardened center, because if
      Message 2 of 6 , Oct 8, 2009
        The Atlas 12" machines take a standard #3 in the headstock and #2 in the
        tailstock. Contrary to William's advice, I would get a hardened center,
        because if the headstock taper is clean and not burred, there should be no
        need to recut it, and it will last longer and be easier on the spindle and
        the work (it can't get dirt embedded in the surface like a soft one).

        On Thu, Oct 8, 2009 at 11:23, William Abernathy <william@...> wrote:

        >
        >
        > dwaynekleck wrote:
        >
        > > What size dead center do I need for the head stock? I see
        > > there are long and short Morse tapers in the table. My Jacob's chuck and
        > live
        > > center for the tail stock are clearly marked #2.
        >
        > #3 MT (short) works fine in the headstock. Get a soft one, so you can recut
        > it
        > as needed.
        >
        > > Question 2 has anyone rented
        > > movies from http://smartflix.com/ ? If so how was the experience and did
        > you
        > > find some great and some not so great?
        >
        > Yes. I've rented a couple of welding videos from them. They deliver
        > promptly, as
        > promised. There was no problem with their service. My only complaint was
        > that I
        > didn't read the fine print on one of their DVDs. Turned out I was watching
        > the
        > first of a 2-part series, and all I saw was the safety checks and setup
        > stuff,
        > and none of the desired white-hot metal-on-metal welding action. I was
        > disappointed, but it's not their fault I'm too dumb to read what's printed
        > there
        > on the screen.
        >
        > Good luck with your T.
        >
        > --William
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • William Rutiser
        ... Your lathe has a Morse #3 taper in the headstock and a Morse #2 in the tailstock. Its common to have a #3 to #2 adapter sleeve to hold #2 tapers in the
        Message 3 of 6 , Oct 8, 2009
          dwaynekleck wrote:
          > Hi, my name is Dwayne and I am a new member to the group. I am 61 years old, retired from the US Navy, and am still working as a mechanic in a power plant in southern California. I bought a Craftsman lathe about a year ago. The old gentleman who owned it was having health problems and wanted to get rid of his toys so his wife didn't have to deal with it. It is a Model 101-07403/2077 (12 X 30). It came with a quick change, 3 and 4 jaw chucks, face plate and a Jacob's chuck. It is in good shape only it was really dirty when I got it. It still has the Craftsman motor on it. I bought a lot of tool bits etc from a local machinery salvage business and a milling attachment from E-bay. I joined the group to try and pick up some pointers and hopefully learn more about using my unit. I have built a sheet metal brake, slip roller and am currently working on a bead roller. Up next is an English wheel. All of this is in support of my 1920 model T roadster project. Here are my first two questions. What size dead center do I need for the head stock? I see there are long and short Morse tapers in the table. My Jacob's chuck and live center for the tail stock are clearly marked #2. Question 2 has anyone rented movies from http://smartflix.com/ ? If so how was the experience and did you find some great and some not so great? And a little side story. When I went to look at the lathe when the old guy rolled up the garage door there set an original not restored 1928 Chrysler roadster that his uncle bought in 1930. He ask me if I wanted buy it but one old car at a time is enough. Besides my wife knows how a gun works. Thanks Dwayne
          >
          Your lathe has a Morse #3 taper in the headstock and a Morse #2 in the
          tailstock. Its common to have a #3 to #2 adapter sleeve to hold #2
          tapers in the headstock. Its likely that such a sleeve was included with
          the lathe when it left the factory.

          Note that making a sleeve and center wouldn't be out of the question and
          would make an excellent learning experience in taper turning. Use your
          headstock and tailstock as gauges.

          Bill
        • jmartin957@aol.com
          In a message dated 10/8/09 11:36:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, ... Contrary to both sets of advice, I d get a Morse #2 center for the headstock. Plus a Morse
          Message 4 of 6 , Oct 8, 2009
            In a message dated 10/8/09 11:36:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
            woodworker88@... writes:

            > The Atlas 12" machines take a standard #3 in the headstock and #2 in the
            > tailstock. Contrary to William's advice, I would get a hardened center,
            > because if the headstock taper is clean and not burred, there should be no
            > need to recut it, and it will last longer and be easier on the spindle and
            > the work (it can't get dirt embedded in the surface like a soft one).
            >

            Contrary to both sets of advice, I'd get a Morse #2 center for the
            headstock. Plus a Morse #3 to #2 reducing sleeve. Two advantages: the #2 centers
            are cheaper, and you can use them in the tailstock as well. With the sleeve,
            you can also use the other tailstock tooling -- such as drill chucks -- in
            the headstock, and make up any special tailstock tooling you might need.
            You can use it to clean up your tailstock center, which you will have to do on
            occasion. You might lose a very small bit of accuracy due to the sleeve,
            but I wouldn't worry at all about that.

            As to hardened vs. soft centers, I'd probably go with a soft center for the
            headstock. You don't get much wear on the live (headstock) center as it
            turns with the work. About the only time you'll get wear is when cutting
            tapers with an offset tailstock, which causes the work to rock on the center.
            Wear is minimal, though.

            The hardened centers are typically hardened just at the tip -- often, it's
            a piece of ball bearing steel or carbide inserted into a soft body.

            For the tailstock, you definitely want a hardened center.

            John Martin


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • JACK SIMS
            One thing about advice, there is never a shortage of it [:-) Jack Sims ... From: jmartin957@aol.com To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com Sent: Thursday,
            Message 5 of 6 , Oct 8, 2009
              One thing about advice, there is never a shortage of it [:-)
              Jack Sims
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: jmartin957@...
              To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, October 08, 2009 11:29 AM
              Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Introduction and a couple of questions


              In a message dated 10/8/09 11:36:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
              woodworker88@... writes:

              > The Atlas 12" machines take a standard #3 in the headstock and #2 in the
              > tailstock. Contrary to William's advice, I would get a hardened center,
              > because if the headstock taper is clean and not burred, there should be no
              > need to recut it, and it will last longer and be easier on the spindle and
              > the work (it can't get dirt embedded in the surface like a soft one).
              >

              Contrary to both sets of advice, I'd get a Morse #2 center for the
              headstock. Plus a Morse #3 to #2 reducing sleeve. Two advantages: the #2 centers
              are cheaper, and you can use them in the tailstock as well. With the sleeve,
              you can also use the other tailstock tooling -- such as drill chucks -- in
              the headstock, and make up any special tailstock tooling you might need.
              You can use it to clean up your tailstock center, which you will have to do on
              occasion. You might lose a very small bit of accuracy due to the sleeve,
              but I wouldn't worry at all about that.

              As to hardened vs. soft centers, I'd probably go with a soft center for the
              headstock. You don't get much wear on the live (headstock) center as it
              turns with the work. About the only time you'll get wear is when cutting
              tapers with an offset tailstock, which causes the work to rock on the center.
              Wear is minimal, though.

              The hardened centers are typically hardened just at the tip -- often, it's
              a piece of ball bearing steel or carbide inserted into a soft body.

              For the tailstock, you definitely want a hardened center.

              John Martin

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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