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Re: Drill sizes

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  • catboat15@aol.com
    Drills. One way to get a good set of drills is to watch Harbor Fright for one of their sales. Buy one of their sets of inch and number drills. Then knowing
    Message 1 of 65 , Jun 2, 2009
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      Drills. One way to get a good set of drills is to watch Harbor Fright for
      one of their sales. Buy one of their sets of inch and number drills. Then
      knowing they are junk use them one time and depending on your projects you
      will find that you use some sizes much more than others. (I build model
      steam engines and need a lot of holes tapped for 2-56, 3-48 and 4-40 so I
      replace those tapping sizes with good quality drill bits.

      Use the rest for drilling holes to hang pictures on the wall or putting up
      a new gate on the garden wall etc.

      I have a little booklet that not only gives a single tapping drill size for
      machine tools but also is spread out to give various drill sizes for
      percentage thread on machine screws. As I remember it goes with drill sizes for
      100 percent thread down to 40 percent, and a note "On machine screws a 60
      percent thread will break the screw before stripping out the thread." So I
      aim towards a 60 percent full thread and that is a couple sizes larger than
      the theory shows. Saves a lot of broken taps over the years. One thing I
      have learned in tapping small threads that if possible I hold the work piece
      in one hand and the tap wrench in the other hand and tap the hole "free
      hand". Your sense of touch will tell you if you are putting excess force on
      the tap and sure prevents a lot of broken taps. Of course lots of tapping
      fluid and back out to clear chips often.
      I just had a project that used a lot of 2-56 threads and did the bunch with
      no breakage by hand holding both the tap and the work.
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    • L. Garlinghouse
      Another Stupid Machinist Trick to avoid is: Getting impatient and once the lathe has been turned off helping to slow down the chuck with the palm of the hand.
      Message 65 of 65 , Jun 22, 2009
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        Another Stupid Machinist Trick to avoid is: Getting impatient and once the lathe has been turned off helping to slow down the chuck with the palm of the hand.

        If the chuck jaws are beneath the surface of the outer periphery you can easily build up a false sense of security and mastery. No need to mention the "What happens next" scenario but . . .

        When I was young, a friend of the family -- a guy who should have known better -- ended up getting 3 fingers pulled off his left hand saving time by manually slowing down the spinning chuck.

        If you are going to use a chip hook [not reccomended] nothing stouter than a coat hanger so under tension it may straighten out and release. No looped handle -- if it wants to slip out of your hand, so much the better. Better still, regrind the tool to a chip-breaker form.

        Some industrial plants won't even let folks on the factory floor with a continuous strap watch band. Catboat15's rules are very well stated.




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: catboat15@...
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Friday, June 05, 2009 9:35 AM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Oily crud and slivers





        My rule, and for the grandkids who like to watch and learn is No gloves
        around the lathe or mill, short or rolled up sleeves, put rings and watches in
        your pocket. If needed use a wire hook (coat hanger wire) to pull chips
        away from the cutter. Never leave a key in a chuck. Think of what you are
        doing before doing it.
        Any tool that can cut metal has no problem in cutting meat.
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