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Re: Toolpost

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  • catboat15@aol.com
    You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are way oils that prevent
    Message 1 of 30 , Apr 30, 2009
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      You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle
      bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are "way oils" that
      prevent the stick and slip on sliding surfaces. Atlas bearings are "once
      through" bearings and you add oil at the top and it slowly runs out the
      bottom and carries crud along with the old oil.
      You don't want automobile engine oil as it has detergents to keep the crud
      in suspension so it can be removed by the engine's oil filter and Atlas
      never added an oil filter. Best to let the oil run on through along with crud.
      On most of the oil points, as on the spindle there are felts that allow
      the proper amount of oil to run through. Depending on your model there may be
      things that look like a pipe cleaner to direct oil to the gears under the
      apron.
      I would recommend you call Clausing with your model number and obtain "The
      Book" and a lube chart so you are not flying blind. You can get contact
      information in the files of this list.


      **************Join ChristianMingle.com® FREE! Meet Christian Singles in
      your area. Start now!
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    • sacycle
      ... Thank you I found a lube chart in the files. Steve
      Message 2 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, catboat15@... wrote:
        >
        > You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle
        > bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are "way oils" that
        > prevent the stick and slip on sliding surfaces. Atlas bearings are "once
        > through" bearings and you add oil at the top and it slowly runs out the
        > bottom and carries crud along with the old oil.
        > You don't want automobile engine oil as it has detergents to keep the crud
        > in suspension so it can be removed by the engine's oil filter and Atlas
        > never added an oil filter. Best to let the oil run on through along with crud.
        > On most of the oil points, as on the spindle there are felts that allow
        > the proper amount of oil to run through. Depending on your model there may be
        > things that look like a pipe cleaner to direct oil to the gears under the
        > apron.
        > I would recommend you call Clausing with your model number and obtain "The
        > Book" and a lube chart so you are not flying blind. You can get contact
        > information in the files of this list.
        >
        >
        > **************Join ChristianMingle.com® FREE! Meet Christian Singles in
        > your area. Start now!
        > (http://pr.atwola.com/promoclk/100126575x1221673648x1201419171/aol?redir=http://www.christianmingle.com/campaign.html%3Fcat%3Dadbuy%26
        > src%3Dplatforma%26adid%3Dfooter:050109%26newurl%3Dreg_path.html)
        >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        Thank you I found a lube chart in the files. Steve
      • Richard Hughson
        Geez, now that I m thinking about it, it may not make any difference whether there s detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then it would make
        Message 3 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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          Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference whether there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then it would make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in the oil. But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets washed out with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not aware of here?

          Richard


          --- On Fri, 5/1/09, catboat15@... <catboat15@...> wrote:

          From: catboat15@... <catboat15@...>
          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost
          To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Friday, May 1, 2009, 12:39 AM

















          You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle

          bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are "way oils" that

          prevent the stick and slip on sliding surfaces. Atlas bearings are "once

          through" bearings and you add oil at the top and it slowly runs out the

          bottom and carries crud along with the old oil.

          You don't want automobile engine oil as it has detergents to keep the crud

          in suspension so it can be removed by the engine's oil filter and Atlas

          never added an oil filter. Best to let the oil run on through along with crud.

          On most of the oil points, as on the spindle there are felts that allow

          the proper amount of oil to run through. Depending on your model there may be

          things that look like a pipe cleaner to direct oil to the gears under the

          apron.

          I would recommend you call Clausing with your model number and obtain "The

          Book" and a lube chart so you are not flying blind. You can get contact

          information in the files of this list.





          ************ **Join ChristianMingle. com® FREE! Meet Christian Singles in

          your area. Start now!

          (http://pr.atwola. com/promoclk/ 100126575x122167 3648x1201419171/ aol?redir= http://www. christianmingle. com/campaign. html%3Fcat% 3Dadbuy%26

          src%3Dplatforma% 26adid%3Dfooter: 050109%26newurl% 3Dreg_path. html)



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]































          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jerdal@sbcglobal.net
          ... From: Richard Hughson To: Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 7:19 AM Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re:
          Message 4 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "Richard Hughson" <loopyrich@...>
            To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 7:19 AM
            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost


            Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference whether
            there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then it would
            make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in the oil.
            But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets washed out
            with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not aware of here?

            Richard

            I think I agree.... In a total loss system, detergents might well be an
            advantage... Why let the oil drop its crud inside the bearing, instead of
            carrying it all away in suuspension? Unless there are factors with
            automotive oil that mean it is a poor, inefficient, and damaging lubricant,
            why not use it for a total loss application?

            I suspect the people suggesting that the detergents are a problem may be
            using a somewhat "one size fits all" pattern of thinking.

            JT
          • Russ Kepler
            ... Even though the oil falls through there is some oil that collects in the bottom of the bearing well between the seals. I would expect that adding
            Message 5 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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              On Friday 01 May 2009 06:19:15 Richard Hughson wrote:
              > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference
              > whether there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then
              > it would make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in
              > the oil. But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets
              > washed out with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not
              > aware of here?

              Even though the oil falls through there is some oil that collects in the
              bottom of the bearing well between the seals. I would expect that adding
              detergent oil to a system that's never seen detergent would cause the crud
              that's been collected there to wash out and into the bearings until enough
              time passes that the crud is carried away with the lost oil.
            • Richard Hughson
              Ok, ya got me on that one. I ve never had my headstock apart to see how much oil could collect there nor how much crud might be there. That would be
              Message 6 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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                Ok, ya got me on that one. I've never had my headstock apart to see how much oil could collect there nor how much crud might be there. That would be interesting to find out.

                On the other hand, here's a quote:

                Automotive greases and industrial greases are not equal. Many of the
                automotive greases have anti-wear additives that are made from
                polysulfides and/or chlorinated esters. These additives will attack
                "red metals" (copper) and will pit bronze and many brass alloys. Don't
                use automotive lubricants in machine tools or woodworking machines!

                It came from this link that I'm just reading now.

                http://wiki.owwm.com/Default.aspx?Page=Greases%20and%20Lubrication&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

                I'm hoping to learn more.

                Richard



                --- On Fri, 5/1/09, Russ Kepler <russ@...> wrote:

                From: Russ Kepler <russ@...>
                Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost
                To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Friday, May 1, 2009, 9:49 AM

















                On Friday 01 May 2009 06:19:15 Richard Hughson wrote:

                > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference

                > whether there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then

                > it would make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in

                > the oil. But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets

                > washed out with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not

                > aware of here?



                Even though the oil falls through there is some oil that collects in the

                bottom of the bearing well between the seals. I would expect that adding

                detergent oil to a system that's never seen detergent would cause the crud

                that's been collected there to wash out and into the bearings until enough

                time passes that the crud is carried away with the lost oil.































                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • James Blackett
                Just a comment, I only use my Atlas for a hobby - dont do anything to serious, so I m not after the ultimate performance. I always have automotive lubricant
                Message 7 of 30 , May 1, 2009
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                  Just a comment,

                  I only use my Atlas for a hobby - dont do anything to serious, so I'm not after the ultimate performance. I always have automotive lubricant available from servicing my car, so I use it on everything except gears. Its worked fine for me for the last 30 years with no problems and I dont have to purchase anything else or worry about which oil for which bit. The most important thing is to keep things clean and lubricated,

                  James
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Richard Hughson
                  To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Friday, May 01, 2009 5:40 PM
                  Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost





                  Ok, ya got me on that one. I've never had my headstock apart to see how much oil could collect there nor how much crud might be there. That would be interesting to find out.

                  On the other hand, here's a quote:

                  Automotive greases and industrial greases are not equal. Many of the
                  automotive greases have anti-wear additives that are made from
                  polysulfides and/or chlorinated esters. These additives will attack
                  "red metals" (copper) and will pit bronze and many brass alloys. Don't
                  use automotive lubricants in machine tools or woodworking machines!

                  It came from this link that I'm just reading now.

                  http://wiki.owwm.com/Default.aspx?Page=Greases%20and%20Lubrication&AspxAutoDetectCookieSupport=1

                  I'm hoping to learn more.

                  Richard

                  --- On Fri, 5/1/09, Russ Kepler <russ@...> wrote:

                  From: Russ Kepler <russ@...>
                  Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost
                  To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Friday, May 1, 2009, 9:49 AM

                  On Friday 01 May 2009 06:19:15 Richard Hughson wrote:

                  > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference

                  > whether there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then

                  > it would make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in

                  > the oil. But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets

                  > washed out with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not

                  > aware of here?

                  Even though the oil falls through there is some oil that collects in the

                  bottom of the bearing well between the seals. I would expect that adding

                  detergent oil to a system that's never seen detergent would cause the crud

                  that's been collected there to wash out and into the bearings until enough

                  time passes that the crud is carried away with the lost oil.











                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • William Abernathy
                  I have heard two reasons for not using automotive oils. 1) The detergent keeps dirt in suspension. 2) The detergent keeps water in suspension. Of these, I
                  Message 8 of 30 , May 3, 2009
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                    I have heard two reasons for not using automotive oils.
                    1) The detergent keeps dirt in suspension.
                    2) The detergent keeps water in suspension.

                    Of these, I would find #2 more worrisome, especially if I lived in a humid
                    environment, and only used the lathe every few weekends or less frequently. The
                    concern is that the detergent does what surfactants do, which is to make it
                    possible for polar water and non-polar oil molecules to bond to each other.
                    This, theoretically, would make it easier for water to get into the oil and pit
                    the bearings.

                    It's an interesting theory, but I've seen no evidence of it. I used automotive
                    oils for a while, then I ordered a gallon jug of spindle oil from Enco, and
                    haven't looked back. The oil was cheap, the lathe runs just the same as it ever
                    did, and now I can cross off the list another way I might be screwing up the lathe.

                    --W

                    Richard Hughson wrote:
                    > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference whether
                    > there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then it would
                    > make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in the oil. But
                    > in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets washed out with
                    > the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not aware of here?
                    >
                    > Richard
                    >
                    >
                    > --- On Fri, 5/1/09, catboat15@... <catboat15@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > From: catboat15@... <catboat15@...> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re:
                    > Toolpost To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com Date: Friday, May 1, 2009, 12:39
                    > AM
                    >
                    > You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle
                    >
                    > bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are "way oils"
                    > that
                    >
                    > prevent the stick and slip on sliding surfaces. Atlas bearings are "once
                    >
                    > through" bearings and you add oil at the top and it slowly runs out the
                    >
                    > bottom and carries crud along with the old oil.
                    >
                    > You don't want automobile engine oil as it has detergents to keep the crud
                    >
                    > in suspension so it can be removed by the engine's oil filter and Atlas
                    >
                    > never added an oil filter. Best to let the oil run on through along with
                    > crud.
                    >
                    > On most of the oil points, as on the spindle there are felts that allow
                    >
                    > the proper amount of oil to run through. Depending on your model there may
                    > be
                    >
                    > things that look like a pipe cleaner to direct oil to the gears under the
                    >
                    > apron.
                  • Richard Hughson
                    Yup, my lathe is older than I am. I ve realized I m only a caretaker of it for awhile. If I could pass it on in very good shape someday I d feel pretty good
                    Message 9 of 30 , May 4, 2009
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                      Yup, my lathe is older than I am. I've realized I'm only a caretaker of it for awhile. If I could pass it on in very good shape someday I'd feel pretty good about it.

                      Rick



                      --- On Sun, 5/3/09, William Abernathy <william@...> wrote:

                      From: William Abernathy <william@...>
                      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Toolpost
                      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Sunday, May 3, 2009, 1:50 PM

















                      I have heard two reasons for not using automotive oils.

                      1) The detergent keeps dirt in suspension.

                      2) The detergent keeps water in suspension.



                      Of these, I would find #2 more worrisome, especially if I lived in a humid

                      environment, and only used the lathe every few weekends or less frequently. The

                      concern is that the detergent does what surfactants do, which is to make it

                      possible for polar water and non-polar oil molecules to bond to each other.

                      This, theoretically, would make it easier for water to get into the oil and pit

                      the bearings.



                      It's an interesting theory, but I've seen no evidence of it. I used automotive

                      oils for a while, then I ordered a gallon jug of spindle oil from Enco, and

                      haven't looked back. The oil was cheap, the lathe runs just the same as it ever

                      did, and now I can cross off the list another way I might be screwing up the lathe.



                      --W



                      Richard Hughson wrote:

                      > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference whether

                      > there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then it would

                      > make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in the oil. But

                      > in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets washed out with

                      > the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not aware of here?

                      >

                      > Richard

                      >

                      >

                      > --- On Fri, 5/1/09, catboat15@aol. com <catboat15@aol. com> wrote:

                      >

                      > From: catboat15@aol. com <catboat15@aol. com> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re:

                      > Toolpost To: atlas_craftsman@ yahoogroups. com Date: Friday, May 1, 2009, 12:39

                      > AM

                      >

                      > You also asked about oils for your lathe. The general oil for spindle

                      >

                      > bearings is a light non detergent oil. For the ways there are "way oils"

                      > that

                      >

                      > prevent the stick and slip on sliding surfaces. Atlas bearings are "once

                      >

                      > through" bearings and you add oil at the top and it slowly runs out the

                      >

                      > bottom and carries crud along with the old oil.

                      >

                      > You don't want automobile engine oil as it has detergents to keep the crud

                      >

                      > in suspension so it can be removed by the engine's oil filter and Atlas

                      >

                      > never added an oil filter. Best to let the oil run on through along with

                      > crud.

                      >

                      > On most of the oil points, as on the spindle there are felts that allow

                      >

                      > the proper amount of oil to run through. Depending on your model there may

                      > be

                      >

                      > things that look like a pipe cleaner to direct oil to the gears under the

                      >

                      > apron.































                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Stanley, Joey
                      Hello Friends, I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful
                      Message 10 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                        Hello Friends,
                        I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on it.

                        Thanks.
                        Joey
                      • Russ Kepler
                        ... One such book would the the South Bend Machine Shop Projects book (one supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has everything
                        Message 11 of 30 , May 15, 2009
                        • 0 Attachment
                          On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:
                          > Hello Friends,
                          > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a
                          > little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine
                          > that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good
                          > beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something
                          > for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build
                          > some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine
                          > but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on
                          > it.

                          One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one
                          supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has
                          everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.
                          Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.

                          It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will
                          be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This
                          is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after
                          making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.

                          If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or miniature
                          combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.
                        • jo barden
                          I have over the years built up a number of projects from on line sources, if you want to have a look at some try these sites, some are for different lathes but
                          Message 12 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                            I have over the years built up a number of projects from on line sources, if you want to have a look at some try these sites, some are for different lathes but projects are still good, hope they are useful

                            Jon



                            http://www.john-tom.com/html/SteamPlans.html
                            http://www.geocities.com/minidampf/brazil_uk/contents.html
                            http://www.vintageprojects.com/machine-shop/steam-engine-hobby.html
                            http://metalworking.com/tutorials/ARMY-TC-9-524/9-524-index.html
                            http://npmccabe.tripod.com/steam.htm
                            http://www.gadgetbuilder.com/
                            http://www.bedair.org/9x20camlock/9x20project.html

                            To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                            From: russ@...
                            Date: Fri, 15 May 2009 08:57:46 -0600
                            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?


























                            On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:

                            > Hello Friends,

                            > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a

                            > little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine

                            > that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good

                            > beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something

                            > for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build

                            > some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine

                            > but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on

                            > it.



                            One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one

                            supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has

                            everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.

                            Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.



                            It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will

                            be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This

                            is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after

                            making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.



                            If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or miniature

                            combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.






















                            _________________________________________________________________
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                          • Stanley, Joey
                            Thanks Russ, I will look into that book. An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner project. Seems like a strange thing for me
                            Message 13 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                              Thanks Russ, I will look into that book.

                              An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner project. Seems like a strange thing for me to say being interested in model railroads but I am not really interested in building steam engines. I have seen several really nice ones built by Ed Hume and others at the local club meetings.

                              Joey


                              -----Original Message-----
                              From: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com [mailto:atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Russ Kepler
                              Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 9:58 AM
                              To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                              Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?

                              On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:
                              > Hello Friends,
                              > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a
                              > little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine
                              > that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good
                              > beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something
                              > for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build
                              > some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine
                              > but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on
                              > it.

                              One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one
                              supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has
                              everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.
                              Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.

                              It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will
                              be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This
                              is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after
                              making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.

                              If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or miniature
                              combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.
                            • Richard Hughson
                              Getting lost making the tool to make the tool to make the tool. Yup.  :o) Rick ... From: Russ Kepler Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman]
                              Message 14 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                "Getting lost making the tool to make the tool to make the tool." Yup.  :o)
                                Rick


                                --- On Fri, 5/15/09, Russ Kepler <russ@...> wrote:

                                From: Russ Kepler <russ@...>
                                Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?
                                To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Friday, May 15, 2009, 10:57 AM
























                                On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:

                                > Hello Friends,

                                > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a

                                > little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine

                                > that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good

                                > beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something

                                > for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build

                                > some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine

                                > but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on

                                > it.



                                One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one

                                supplier: http://www.lindsayb ks.com/bks4/ sblpro/index. html ) It has

                                everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.

                                Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.



                                It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will

                                be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This

                                is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after

                                making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.



                                If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or miniature

                                combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.






























                                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              • Russ Kepler
                                ... A simple steam engine is a good starting point and one I d suggest before starting a combustion engine. But you can find plans for bar stock engine like
                                Message 15 of 30 , May 15, 2009
                                • 0 Attachment
                                  On Friday 15 May 2009 10:04:42 Stanley, Joey wrote:
                                  > Thanks Russ, I will look into that book.
                                  >
                                  > An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner
                                  > project. Seems like a strange thing for me to say being interested in model
                                  > railroads but I am not really interested in building steam engines. I have
                                  > seen several really nice ones built by Ed Hume and others at the local club
                                  > meetings.

                                  A simple steam engine is a good starting point and one I'd suggest before
                                  starting a combustion engine. But you can find plans for 'bar stock' engine
                                  like the 'Little Angel" from Bob Shores http://www.bobshores.com (actually,
                                  Bob passed away but his widow still sells his plans). Bar stock is a decent
                                  way to start - if you screw up a part it's less expensive to replace than a
                                  casting.

                                  Something else you might consider are some of the tools from Metal Lathe
                                  Accessories http://www.sc-c.com/metallathe/index.html Making those will both
                                  improve your abilities but increase the flexibility of your lathe. If you
                                  don't have a mill you might make his milling attachment, if you do his
                                  transfer block is a good project.
                                • Starlight Tool Services Ltd
                                  Link to Document: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7827348/US-Navy-Course-NAVEDTRA-1416114162-Machinery-Repairman Title: US Navy Course NAVEDTRA 14161_14162 -
                                  Message 16 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                    Link to Document: http://www.scribd.com/doc/7827348/US-Navy-Course-NAVEDTRA-1416114162-Machinery-Repairman

                                    Title: "US Navy Course NAVEDTRA 14161_14162 - Machinery Repairman"

                                    Any of the Machinist Bedside Readers by Guy Lautard http://www.lautard.com/

                                    Machine Shop Trade Secrets by James Harvey

                                    The MIT Vidoe series already mentioned and the Harvey Mudd College series http://www.eng.hmc.edu/E8/Videos.htm

                                    Also see Steve Wells Site, he has lots of books and vidoes on there http://www.wswells.com/index.html

                                    And another link to some interesting articles is Rick Sparber http://rick.sparber.org/ma.htm

                                    Hope these help

                                    Walter

                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    From: Stanley, Joey
                                    To: 'atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com'
                                    Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 9:04 AM
                                    Subject: RE: [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?





                                    Thanks Russ, I will look into that book.

                                    An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner project. Seems like a strange thing for me to say being interested in model railroads but I am not really interested in building steam engines. I have seen several really nice ones built by Ed Hume and others at the local club meetings.

                                    Joey


                                    -----Original Message-----
                                    From: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com [mailto:atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Russ Kepler
                                    Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 9:58 AM
                                    To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                    Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?

                                    On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:
                                    > Hello Friends,
                                    > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a
                                    > little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine
                                    > that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good
                                    > beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something
                                    > for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build
                                    > some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine
                                    > but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on
                                    > it.

                                    One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one
                                    supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has
                                    everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.
                                    Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.

                                    It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will
                                    be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This
                                    is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after
                                    making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.

                                    If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or miniature
                                    combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.






                                    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------



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                                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
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                                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  • William Abernathy
                                    Message 17 of 30 , May 15, 2009
                                    • 0 Attachment
                                      Stanley, Joey wrote:
                                      > Thanks Russ, I will look into that book.
                                      >
                                      > An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner
                                      > project. Seems like a strange thing for me to say being interested in model
                                      > railroads but I am not really interested in building steam engines. I have
                                      > seen several really nice ones built by Ed Hume and others at the local club
                                      > meetings.
                                      >
                                      > Joey
                                      >
                                      >
                                      > -----Original Message-----
                                      > From: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                      [mailto:atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Russ Kepler Sent:
                                      > Friday, May 15, 2009 9:58 AM To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com Subject: Re:
                                      > [atlas_craftsman] Project Books?
                                      >
                                      > On Friday 15 May 2009 08:40:56 Stanley, Joey wrote:
                                      >> Hello Friends, I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and
                                      >> learning a little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this
                                      >> wonderful machine that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with
                                      >> it. So, any good beginners projects books out there that y'all would
                                      >> recommend? Something for the beginner that I could look through for some
                                      >> inspiration to build some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find
                                      >> uses for the machine but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending
                                      >> all that money on it.
                                      >
                                      > One such book would the the South Bend "Machine Shop Projects" book (one
                                      > supplier: http://www.lindsaybks.com/bks4/sblpro/index.html ) It has
                                      > everything from beginner to advanced project and step-by-step instructions.
                                      > Most of the projects are for tools that you could actually use.
                                      >
                                      > It's likely that you'll find that many of the first projects that you do will
                                      > be to make tooling to make what you wanted to make in the first place. This
                                      > is normal for someone starting out, just try to avoid getting lost after
                                      > making the tool to make the tool to make the tool to make the tool.
                                      >
                                      > If you have more specific interests (such as making steam engines or
                                      > miniature combustion engines) more specific advice could be given.
                                      >
                                      >
                                    • William Abernathy
                                      Sorry to everyone for the empty re-post a few seconds ago. In addition to the other fine suggestions for projects, I should like to add: The Starrett Book for
                                      Message 18 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                        Sorry to everyone for the empty re-post a few seconds ago.

                                        In addition to the other fine suggestions for projects, I should like to add:
                                        The Starrett Book for Student Machinists, which is a classic primer on basic
                                        technique.

                                        Concerning "simple" IC engines, the conventional wisdom is that steam engines
                                        are easier than IC engines.

                                        --William A.

                                        Stanley, Joey wrote:
                                        > Thanks Russ, I will look into that book.
                                        >
                                        > An simple combustion engine of some sort would be cool if that is beginner
                                        > project. Seems like a strange thing for me to say being interested in model
                                        > railroads but I am not really interested in building steam engines. I have
                                        > seen several really nice ones built by Ed Hume and others at the local club
                                        > meetings.
                                        >
                                        > Joey
                                      • jworman
                                        ... Joey, I truly think you will find this a temporary situation (looking for something to build) unless you want to make something each day. I am often
                                        Message 19 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Stanley, Joey" <joey.stanley@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > Hello Friends,
                                          > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on it.
                                          >
                                          > Thanks.
                                          > Joey
                                          >
                                          Joey, I truly think you will find this a temporary situation (looking for something to build) unless you want to make something each day. I am often amazed that any household can survive without a 10" Atlas lathe. I've used mine for 'around the house' project that I would never have imagined when I bought it 35 years ago. Sometimes I use it for just a few minutes. Sometimes much longer. It's even gotten so far that sometimes my wife will say "can you do it on the lathe" as I've repaired so many things using this great machine. She doesn't always know what it does, but she does know that things get fixed after using the machine.

                                          When my machine first came up for sale, I was so poor I couldn't pay attention. A friend was selling it and I knew I wanted it. I remembered a tax refund I had coming. It was just enough.

                                          There were plenty of places where the money would be more than useful, but with fast talk (and probably pleading eyes) we bought the lathe. For a few years, each time the machine was used, I was sure to mention that it had saved the day again. Finally my wife informed me "OK, the lathe has proved its worth. Please don't try to justify its purchase any more."

                                          Occasionally I still have to mention it, but the lathe is at home here.

                                          Hang in there. Soon you will wonder how you ever made it without having it.

                                          John
                                        • L. Garlinghouse
                                          I ll second John s remark that one simply cannot run a house without a lathe. Here is a use I ve put it for several times. Repairing broken plastic pipe, as
                                          Message 20 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                            I'll second John's remark that one simply cannot run a house without a lathe.

                                            Here is a use I've put it for several times. Repairing broken plastic pipe, as in an outside sprinkler system. I've been able to cut the broken pipe off at the fitting and then machine out the fitting so I can reuse it. No telling how many trips to the hardware store I've saved. Thinking about it, I doubt I ever saved any Tees, but plenty of straight couplings.

                                            Also made some shouldered drifts for removing and installing valve guides in aluminum heads [VW, BSA Gold Star]. [Heat head to 350F in the oven, put new guides in the freezer]. Lots of quick tooling you can make out of bolts or other round stock.

                                            I'll think some more. I'm sure by the time this thread dies, you will have a life time of projects to choose from.

                                            Later,

                                            L.H. Garlinghouse
                                            Arkansas


                                            ----- Original Message -----
                                            From: jworman
                                            To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                                            Sent: Friday, May 15, 2009 7:50 PM
                                            Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Project Books?





                                            --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Stanley, Joey" <joey.stanley@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > Hello Friends,
                                            > I have enjoyed returning my Atlas 10F to a useable state and learning a little about its workings but now I am stuck. I have this wonderful machine that I have always wanted and don't know what to do with it. So, any good beginners projects books out there that y'all would recommend? Something for the beginner that I could look through for some inspiration to build some little gadget? I am sure I will eventually find uses for the machine but I hate seeing it just setting there after spending all that money on it.
                                            >
                                            > Thanks.
                                            > Joey
                                            >
                                            Joey, I truly think you will find this a temporary situation (looking for something to build) unless you want to make something each day. I am often amazed that any household can survive without a 10" Atlas lathe. I've used mine for 'around the house' project that I would never have imagined when I bought it 35 years ago. Sometimes I use it for just a few minutes. Sometimes much longer. It's even gotten so far that sometimes my wife will say "can you do it on the lathe" as I've repaired so many things using this great machine. She doesn't always know what it does, but she does know that things get fixed after using the machine.

                                            When my machine first came up for sale, I was so poor I couldn't pay attention. A friend was selling it and I knew I wanted it. I remembered a tax refund I had coming. It was just enough.

                                            There were plenty of places where the money would be more than useful, but with fast talk (and probably pleading eyes) we bought the lathe. For a few years, each time the machine was used, I was sure to mention that it had saved the day again. Finally my wife informed me "OK, the lathe has proved its worth. Please don't try to justify its purchase any more."

                                            Occasionally I still have to mention it, but the lathe is at home here.

                                            Hang in there. Soon you will wonder how you ever made it without having it.

                                            John





                                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          • Stanley, Joey
                                            Wow, thanks, didn t expect all this. Thanks everyone for all the suggestions. I will look into them all. The lathe isn t going anywhere and I am not trying to
                                            Message 21 of 30 , May 15, 2009
                                            • 0 Attachment
                                              Wow, thanks, didn't expect all this. Thanks everyone for all the suggestions. I will look into them all.
                                              The lathe isn't going anywhere and I am not trying to justify it. Just want something to do with it until I actually have something to do with it. One thing I don't need right now is more text books. I have about a foot and a half tall stack of them, but I do appreciate the thought.

                                              Joey
                                            • John
                                              You don t use detergent oils on machine tools.
                                              Message 22 of 30 , May 15, 2009
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                                                You don't use detergent oils on machine tools.


                                                --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Russ Kepler <russ@...> wrote:
                                                >
                                                > On Friday 01 May 2009 06:19:15 Richard Hughson wrote:
                                                > > Geez, now that I'm thinking about it, it may not make any difference
                                                > > whether there's detergent in the oil or not. If there was a reservoir then
                                                > > it would make the difference between sludge on the bottom or suspended in
                                                > > the oil. But in a 'once through' system how can it matter? Everything gets
                                                > > washed out with the oil anyway. Are there other considerations I'm not
                                                > > aware of here?
                                                >
                                                > Even though the oil falls through there is some oil that collects in the
                                                > bottom of the bearing well between the seals. I would expect that adding
                                                > detergent oil to a system that's never seen detergent would cause the crud
                                                > that's been collected there to wash out and into the bearings until enough
                                                > time passes that the crud is carried away with the lost oil.
                                                >
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