Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Mad Chemist's Hour - You too can make cup grease in your kitchen!!!

Expand Messages
  • Bruce Freeman
    I m an unemployed chemist, which will explain some of what follows. Before I settled on a small tube of lithium grease to lubricate certain parts of my lathe,
    Message 1 of 2 , Mar 1, 2009
    • 0 Attachment
      I'm an unemployed chemist, which will explain some of what follows.

      Before I settled on a small tube of lithium grease to lubricate
      certain parts of my lathe, I found myself very frustrated not to be
      able to find cup grease (lime grease or calcium grease) commercially
      available. They still make it in India, but I can't find a US
      supplier. All it is is lime or calcium soap (as opposed to the lye or
      sodium soap you use to wash your hands) mixed with mineral oil. No
      big deal.

      So I took matters into my own hands. My first attempt involved
      converting some (home made) household lye soap to lime soap, then
      adding mineral oil. This was messy and inefficient, so I came up with
      the following one-step recipe.

      Note that this recipe was designed to use household ingredients:
      soap, mineral oil, calcium chloride (ice melter), and water. In real
      life, tallow, mineral oil, and hydrated lime would be used, but the
      last is not readily available and the saponification of tallow with
      lime is less easy than with lye.

      1) Use a cheese grater to grate 4 oz. lye soap (Ivory should do).
      2) Place this grated soap in a SS pot or bowl and add 1 pint of warm tap water.
      3) Use your wife's hand-held blender to dissolve the soap and whip it
      into dense suds. (You can tell her you're cleaning it for her.)
      4) Add between 3 oz. and 22 oz of mineral and continue blending to mix
      - it should blend in easily. The more oil you add, the softer the cup
      grease. (I used mineral oil USP from the drug store, on sale for
      $2/quart. I used 9 oz and can report decent results.) Now rinse the
      hand blender in hot tap water - it should come out nice and clean -
      and put it away. You do NOT want to use it in the next steps.
      5) Stir to dissolve 2 oz. calcium chloride ice melt (without sodium
      chloride salt, urea, or any other ingredients) in 1/2 pint of hot tap
      water.
      6) Add the calcium chloride solution to the soap suds, and stir
      thoroughly to convert the suds into a curds-and-whey-like mass of cup
      grease containing large droplets of water.
      7) As soon as the cup grease is in more or less one mass in the pot or
      bowl, drain off the excess water.
      8) Keep stirring to agglomerate the cup grease and eliminate the
      water, which you should keep pouring off.
      9) Optional: Spread a dense cloth (like an old T-shirt) over a SS or
      glass bowl, and scrape the cup grease into the T-shirt. The idea is
      to hang the shirt by its corners from some support like a jelly bag to
      help eliminate the balance of the water. Continued stirring is an
      alternative. Don't expect to save the T-shirt, as this grease may
      never wash out of it!

      My theoretical yield (with 9 oz of mineral oil) was 11 oz cup grease.
      I haven't weighed it to check.

      If anyone else is crazy enough to try this completely unnecessary
      exercise, I'd like to hear from them about their results.
      --
      Bruce
      NJ

      The total lack of evidence is the surest sign that the conspiracy is working.
    • bill phelps
      THAT WAS GOOD FOR A GOOD LAUGH  HARD TO TYPE WHEN YOU LAUGH ... From: Bruce Freeman Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Mad Chemist s Hour - You
      Message 2 of 2 , Mar 1, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        THAT WAS GOOD FOR A GOOD LAUGH  HARD TO TYPE WHEN YOU LAUGH



        --- On Sun, 3/1/09, Bruce Freeman <freemab222@...> wrote:

        From: Bruce Freeman <freemab222@...>
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Mad Chemist's Hour - You too can make cup grease in your kitchen!!!
        To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, 7x12minilathe@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Sunday, March 1, 2009, 1:44 PM






        I'm an unemployed chemist, which will explain some of what follows.

        Before I settled on a small tube of lithium grease to lubricate
        certain parts of my lathe, I found myself very frustrated not to be
        able to find cup grease (lime grease or calcium grease) commercially
        available. They still make it in India, but I can't find a US
        supplier. All it is is lime or calcium soap (as opposed to the lye or
        sodium soap you use to wash your hands) mixed with mineral oil. No
        big deal.

        So I took matters into my own hands. My first attempt involved
        converting some (home made) household lye soap to lime soap, then
        adding mineral oil. This was messy and inefficient, so I came up with
        the following one-step recipe.

        Note that this recipe was designed to use household ingredients:
        soap, mineral oil, calcium chloride (ice melter), and water. In real
        life, tallow, mineral oil, and hydrated lime would be used, but the
        last is not readily available and the saponification of tallow with
        lime is less easy than with lye.

        1) Use a cheese grater to grate 4 oz. lye soap (Ivory should do).
        2) Place this grated soap in a SS pot or bowl and add 1 pint of warm tap water.
        3) Use your wife's hand-held blender to dissolve the soap and whip it
        into dense suds. (You can tell her you're cleaning it for her.)
        4) Add between 3 oz. and 22 oz of mineral and continue blending to mix
        - it should blend in easily. The more oil you add, the softer the cup
        grease. (I used mineral oil USP from the drug store, on sale for
        $2/quart. I used 9 oz and can report decent results.) Now rinse the
        hand blender in hot tap water - it should come out nice and clean -
        and put it away. You do NOT want to use it in the next steps.
        5) Stir to dissolve 2 oz. calcium chloride ice melt (without sodium
        chloride salt, urea, or any other ingredients) in 1/2 pint of hot tap
        water.
        6) Add the calcium chloride solution to the soap suds, and stir
        thoroughly to convert the suds into a curds-and-whey- like mass of cup
        grease containing large droplets of water.
        7) As soon as the cup grease is in more or less one mass in the pot or
        bowl, drain off the excess water.
        8) Keep stirring to agglomerate the cup grease and eliminate the
        water, which you should keep pouring off.
        9) Optional: Spread a dense cloth (like an old T-shirt) over a SS or
        glass bowl, and scrape the cup grease into the T-shirt. The idea is
        to hang the shirt by its corners from some support like a jelly bag to
        help eliminate the balance of the water. Continued stirring is an
        alternative. Don't expect to save the T-shirt, as this grease may
        never wash out of it!

        My theoretical yield (with 9 oz of mineral oil) was 11 oz cup grease.
        I haven't weighed it to check.

        If anyone else is crazy enough to try this completely unnecessary
        exercise, I'd like to hear from them about their results.
        --
        Bruce
        NJ

        The total lack of evidence is the surest sign that the conspiracy is working.


















        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.