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[atlas_craftsman] Re: Quick Change Tool Post

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  • Joe Ross
    Like the others, I would likely be interested. I have a 6 lathe. Would yours fit this? Also, a picture and/or description would be helpful (as well as an
    Message 1 of 73 , May 11, 1999
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      Like the others, I would likely be interested. I have a 6" lathe. Would
      yours fit this? Also, a picture and/or description would be helpful (as
      well as an estimated price!!). Also, what size tool would it take.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: Ted <tburford@...>
      To: <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
      Sent: Tuesday, May 11, 1999 9:56 AM
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Quick Change Tool Post


      > I plan on making some "Quick Change Tool Posts" Is there a market for
      > them in this Atlas / Craftsman Lathe group?
      >
      > Ted
      >
      > tburford@...
      >
      > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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    • Richard Hughson
      Ok, this sounds good but I don t see how pinching the lips of the cast iron compound can do much harm to them. I know they can break in a crash but it doesn t
      Message 73 of 73 , Feb 28, 2012
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        Ok, this sounds good but I don't see how pinching the lips of the cast iron
        compound can do much harm to them. I know they can break in a crash but it
        doesn't seem possible by just pinching them between the bolt and the tool
        post.

        Rick H

        On Tue, Feb 28, 2012 at 11:25 AM, James Irwin <jirwin1@...> wrote:

        > **
        >
        >
        > You make a lot of assertions that run contrary to the mechanics & strength
        > of materials course work I had getting my BS degree.
        >
        > The bolt will not break first, but the threads of the bolt completely
        > bisect
        > (cut in half) the section between the sides of the slot. Therefore, there
        > is
        > no flexural stiffness added by it�s presence.
        >
        > My thought to braze the joint makes one piece of steel out of the bolt and
        > T-nut; to the extent of the tensile strength of the braze to steel joint,
        > at
        > least.
        >
        > I�m be more concerned about failure of the top lips of the cast iron
        > compound slot than any of the bolt or nut parts. Therefore spreading the
        > load over a larger area makes good sense.
        >
        > Jim I
        >
        > On 2/27/12 9:51 PM, "wa5cab@..." wrote:
        > >
        > > That isn't exactly correct. In the first (elementary) analysis, the wings
        > > of the inverted T-nut are in shear. And the longer they are, the higher
        > the
        > > force requred to shear them off. Plus the longer the T-nut, the stiffer
        > it
        > > is. The vertical section of the T that's in the slot contributes more to
        > > this stiffness than do the wings (at least with typical T-nut
        > proportions).
        > > And the longer the T-nut, the smaller the angle it can rotate through.
        > And
        > > the higher the friction force resisting that rotation. And the higher the
        > > total force that would be required to break the top out of the compound.
        > > Bottom line is that with a full length T-nut, the component that will
        > fail is
        > > the bolt, usually at or near the head.
        > >
        > > Also, to comment on an earlier post, it does not matter whether the bolt
        > > threads are coarse or fine. UNF and UNC threads have very close to the
        > same
        > > shear cross-section per linear inch.
        > >
        > > In a message dated 02/27/2012 18:03:34 PM Central Standard Time,
        > > jirwin1@... <mailto:jirwin1%40austin.rr.com> writes:
        > >> > I am more than a little convinced that the only part of the T-nut that
        > >> > really bears against the compound surface is that near the bolt. I.e.
        > The
        > >> > rest is just �along for the ride� as it were. Having the whole
        > slot(?) in
        > >> > the compound filled with steel makes us feel good, but does little to
        > >> > improve strength. Not that it probably really matters, I suppose.
        > >> >
        > >> > Bottom line is that a 1 inch long (or maybe less) T-nut will do
        > everything
        > >> > a
        > >> > full length one will.
        > >> >
        > >> > Better would be a spring steel T-nut that has a curve calculated so
        > that
        > >> > tightening it down would truly spread the load along the length of the
        > >> > slot
        > >> > in the compound. The T-section is intrinsically pretty stiff, but all
        > >> > effect
        > >> > of the upright center section (beyond simply guiding the nut in the
        > slot,
        > >> > which the bolt does quite well anyway) is wasted material.
        > >> >
        > >> > Jim
        > >> >
        > >
        > > Robert Downs - Houston
        > > wa5cab dot com (Web Store)
        > > MVPA 9480
        > >
        > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >


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