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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wintering tools in unheated shelters

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  • Jay Greer
    Boeshield is good as well as expensive. I have used it as well. It does have a tendency like WD40 to leave a sticky residue on the surface after several
    Message 1 of 16 , Oct 7, 2008
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      Boeshield is good as well as expensive. I have used it as well. It does
      have a tendency like WD40 to leave a sticky residue on the surface after
      several months of evaporation.
      Camellia oil runs about eight bucks for a bottle that will last me about
      three years.
      Cheers,
      Jay


      on 10/7/08 9:56, rfmarchi@... at rfmarchi@... wrote:

      >
      >
      >
      >
      > I have a somewhat different problem. I have a new shop at my weekend place in
      > West Virginia. It is wood frame construction, but uninsulated. It also has a
      > vented wood stove and a temporary electrical system fed by a 30A 220 extension
      > cord from one of the house breakers. The power is only connected while I am
      > there. Eventually, I will retire there, permanently electrify it and can keep
      > a small electric heater to ward off condensation. However, for the next few
      > years, it will only be heated when I am there, and will not have electricity
      > while I am not. I'm planning on using Boeshield, but am wondering what other
      > tricks the group might suggest to protect machine and hand tools.
      >
      > Any help will be appreciated.
      >
      > Dick
      >
      > -----Original Message-----
      > From: Jay Greer <redwitch1@... <mailto:redwitch1%40earthlink.net> >
      > To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com <mailto:atlas_craftsman%40yahoogroups.com>
      > Sent: Tue, 7 Oct 2008 11:14 am
      > Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wintering tools in unheated shelters
      >
      > Hi Guys,
      >
      > I live in the Pacific North West where it is both wet and cold in the
      >
      > winter. I have a system that guarantees no rust on my tools. I have, in my
      >
      > shop, a vented wood burning stove. This draws moisture out of the room and
      >
      > sends it up the stack. When not in use, I have heat lamp I put in the fire
      >
      > box. I also use plug in dehumidifiers that are on the floor where moisture
      >
      > settles. Lastly, I coat my tools with a Japanese oil t
      > hat is used to
      >
      > protect the blades of samurai swords. This oil, known as ³Camellia Oil²,
      >
      > has the lowest acid content of any oil other than sperm whale oil and has
      >
      > been keeping my tools rust free for more than thirty years. Camellia oil
      >
      > is just what the name implies. It is pressed from the seeds of the black
      >
      > camellia bush. The Yamato family has had exclusive rights to it, by royal
      >
      > decree, for more than 300 years. Kept in a wick container it only takes a
      >
      > few seconds to apply a thin coat of oil to steel machine tables and
      >
      > individual tools such as chisels, saws and anything that can rust. The time
      >
      > taken to apply it is minimal. The results are well worth it! Camellia oil
      >
      > is inexpensive and a small bottle will last several years. It can be
      >
      > purchased from the Japan Woodworker.
      >
      > http://www.japanwoodworker.com/search.asp
      >
      > Jay Greer
      >
      > Boat Builder
      >
      > on 10/6/08 14:11, sstephanc at sstephanc@...
      > <mailto:sstephanc%40yahoo.com> wrote:
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      >> <mailto:atlas_craftsman%40yahoogroups.com>
      >
      >> > <mailto:atlas_craftsman%40yahoogroups.com> , catboat15@... wrote:
      >
      >>>> >> >
      >
      >>>> >> > Don't make the mistake of covering your lathe or other tools with a
      >
      >> > plastic sheet. Sneak a fabric sheet from the family's linen closet
      >
      >> > (or keep peace in the family, buy a chunk of cloth at a fabric
      >
      >> > store, something that can "breath")
      >
      >>>> >> > A plastic cover will seal in moisture and accelerate rusting.
      >
      >>>> >> > Just don't ask how I learned this.
      >
      >>>> >> >
      >
      >>>> >> >
      > speaking of rust my wife owned beauty shops and for some reason had
      >
      >> > a bottle of HCL among her supplies (Probably used to cut lime off
      >
      >> > things in her shop) Anyway when we moved the sealed (supposedly) jug
      >
      >> > was placed under my workbench. Bad case of rust on everything. I
      >
      >> > exiled the acid to the yard.
      >
      >>>> >> >
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> > I thought that cotton would attract moisture. Polyester probably less.
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> > Very good point about the HCl, aka muriatic acid. I had a jug of it
      >
      >> > in the laundry room and nearby tools got a fine layer of rust all
      >
      >> > over them. Since it is a gas in aqueous solution, like ammonia water,
      >
      >> > it always off-gases. It's best not to keep HCl on hand at all, but if
      >
      >> > you must, then keeping it outside is not really an option either
      >
      >> > since freezing will drive off the HCl gas and make stuff rust in your
      >
      >> > garage, shed or whatever. I solved it by putting the HCl bottle in a
      >
      >> > covered 5 gallon pail that has about 3" of water in it that contains
      >
      >> > a base - in my case the soluble part of wood ash. It works, but it
      >
      >> > does require periodic checking to see that the base has not been
      >
      >> > exhausted.
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> > Scott
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> >
      >
      >> >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >




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    • catboat15@aol.com
      Adding to my advice to use fabric for a tool cover a small light bulb left burning in your shop will provide enough heat to keep condensation at bay. I don t
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 7, 2008
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        Adding to my advice to use fabric for a tool cover a small light bulb left
        burning in your shop will provide enough heat to keep condensation at bay.
        I don't use one here since we live in the desert and there is little
        humidity in the air. But, when I brought some tools from my uncles shop in the
        mountains of Northern Arizona to my shop in the L.A. basin it was instant surface
        rust on everything. The dry climate of the mountains in Arizona was like the
        climate here in the desert, but the climate in the L.A. basin had a lot of
        moisture during parts of the year. (The natives call it the "June Gloom" but I
        call it fog.)




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