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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: 10 x 36 rehabilitation

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  • Russ Kepler
    ... That s exactly how it s used - placed on the bottom of the saddle using the bed as a mold. If the bed is not an accurate form the carriage will take the
    Message 1 of 15 , May 4 6:51 AM
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      On Saturday 03 May 2008 22:47:56 Brett Jones wrote:
      > The way I was thinking of using the Turcite or Moglice, is not to use it
      > to recondition the bed, but to build up the bottom of the carriage (the
      > bed and carriage should be reground at the same time) to bring the
      > carriage up so that the alignment of the screw and rack is within
      > acceptable limits.

      That's exactly how it's used - placed on the bottom of the saddle using the
      bed as a mold. If the bed is not an accurate form the carriage will take the
      inverse of whatever form the bed has. If that doesn't match other parts of
      the bed the saddle will move in a very unusual fashion.

      When I did a lathe (not an Atlas) I made jackscrews that fit the wiper
      holders, this so I could place the saddle in the proper height over the bed
      and the cross slide aligned square to the spindle axis. Once everything was
      right (some loctite in the adjuster threads held the screws nicely) the
      saddle was removed and cleaned, the bed was cleaned, tape placed for oil
      grooves, release applied and finally the Moglice was put ont the underside of
      the saddle and the saddle put in place. After curing the Moglice needed a
      little scraping for oil retention, without it the saddle could grip the bed
      with quite a suction.
    • Jon Elson
      ... When I did my 15 Sheldon, I just drilled down through the carriage at 4 points to support the carriage on the little flat surface between the sides of the
      Message 2 of 15 , May 4 10:03 AM
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        Russ Kepler wrote:
        > On Saturday 03 May 2008 22:47:56 Brett Jones wrote:
        >
        >>The way I was thinking of using the Turcite or Moglice, is not to use it
        >>to recondition the bed, but to build up the bottom of the carriage (the
        >>bed and carriage should be reground at the same time) to bring the
        >>carriage up so that the alignment of the screw and rack is within
        >>acceptable limits.
        >
        >
        > That's exactly how it's used - placed on the bottom of the saddle using the
        > bed as a mold. If the bed is not an accurate form the carriage will take the
        > inverse of whatever form the bed has. If that doesn't match other parts of
        > the bed the saddle will move in a very unusual fashion.
        >
        > When I did a lathe (not an Atlas) I made jackscrews that fit the wiper
        > holders, this so I could place the saddle in the proper height over the bed
        > and the cross slide aligned square to the spindle axis. Once everything was
        > right (some loctite in the adjuster threads held the screws nicely) the
        > saddle was removed and cleaned, the bed was cleaned, tape placed for oil
        > grooves, release applied and finally the Moglice was put ont the underside of
        > the saddle and the saddle put in place. After curing the Moglice needed a
        > little scraping for oil retention, without it the saddle could grip the bed
        > with quite a suction.
        When I did my 15" Sheldon, I just drilled down through the
        carriage at 4 points to support the carriage on the little flat
        surface between the sides of the Vee ways, and in the middle of
        the flat way in back. This allowed for setting the height and
        tilt of the carriage. I then drilled 4 holes in the sides of
        the carriage to align the cross slide way perpendicular to the
        spindle axis. I mounted a dial indicator to the chuck and swung
        it around to measure at two points on a hardened and ground
        shaft laid in the dovetail. I had to back out two of these
        screws to lift the carriage, I then tightened the same ones
        after planting the Mogliced carriage back on the ways.

        Jon
      • Dave Williams
        ... 54 inches is beyond what a standard automotive machine shop would normally be able to handle, but shops that do marine engines or big trucks might have the
        Message 3 of 15 , May 7 12:26 AM
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          Kirk Hillman wrote:

          > It's not really an option to hand scrape this 54" bed. It wouldn't be worth
          > it. There are so many dings and the wear is substantial enough that I would
          > suspect you would need to take off at least 35 thou to get it straight and
          > flat.

          54 inches is beyond what a standard automotive machine shop would
          normally be able to handle, but shops that do marine engines or big
          trucks might have the right equipment.

          Call around and see if you can find some place within driving distance
          that can resurface a cylinder head 54 inches long. If they can, ask
          them if it's a grinder type machine. These are less common than cutter
          type machines. The grinders give a better finish and will easily cut
          hardened ways. These machines will typically hold flat to less than
          half a thousandth, at least when new.

          The more-common cutter-type machines will easily handle the "flame
          hardened" Atlas ways, but the usual cutter inserts give a coarser finish
          than I'd like to see on a lathe bed. There are conversions that use
          round CBN flycutters which would be acceptable, but trying to find that
          sort of thing out can lead to Alien Encounters with the people who
          usually answer the phones. Look for a big-enough grinder first.

          If you can find a shop with the right tool, they'll probably charge
          somewhere between $50 and $150 to resurface your lathe bed.
        • LouD31M066@aol.com
          In the Detroit Metro Area finding a grinding shop capable of doing a long flat job to high precision would be easier than in rural areas or non industrial
          Message 4 of 15 , May 7 7:45 AM
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            In the Detroit Metro Area finding a grinding shop capable of doing a long
            flat
            job to high precision would be easier than in rural areas or non industrial
            communities. Businesses have to advertise so look in yellow pages or
            library
            probably has industrial classification books telling who does what. I found
            shop thru my instructor at night class...one of his prior students had set up
            his own business....grinding.
            Louis



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