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Quick-Change Installation

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  • ebrucehunter
    I have owned a 1930 s 10 Atlas lathe for about 48 years. I am sort of the second owner, as the man who bought the shop tools from the original purchaser s
    Message 1 of 2 , Sep 1, 2007
      I have owned a 1930's 10" Atlas lathe for about 48 years. I am sort of
      the second owner, as the man who bought the shop tools from the
      original purchaser's estate wanted only the woodworking tools and sold
      me the lathe. Over most of the subsequent years I have wanted a quick-
      change, but always thought I would come across a 12" lathe with a quick-
      change, and buy it as a replacement. But now, I have developed a
      sentimental attachment to this lathe and plan to keep it. My question
      is, if I bought a quick-change from a later model lathe, is it going to
      be reasonably practicable to adapt it to my old Atlas? My lathe has
      the 5/8", un-slotted lead screw (without power crossfeed). Could I
      simply machine a bushing to adapt a quick-change from a lathe with 3/4"
      leadscrew? What kind of problems are likely to be encountered in
      adapting the left side reversing mechanism, etc. I will value comments
      and suggestions from those who have been through this.

      Bruce
    • Jon Elson
      ... I think, maybe. Adapting the leadscrew is not likely to be the big problem. Yours is a D model, and I don t know how much is different there. Probably
      Message 2 of 2 , Sep 1, 2007
        ebrucehunter wrote:
        > I have owned a 1930's 10" Atlas lathe for about 48 years. I am sort of
        > the second owner, as the man who bought the shop tools from the
        > original purchaser's estate wanted only the woodworking tools and sold
        > me the lathe. Over most of the subsequent years I have wanted a quick-
        > change, but always thought I would come across a 12" lathe with a quick-
        > change, and buy it as a replacement. But now, I have developed a
        > sentimental attachment to this lathe and plan to keep it. My question
        > is, if I bought a quick-change from a later model lathe, is it going to
        > be reasonably practicable to adapt it to my old Atlas? My lathe has
        > the 5/8", un-slotted lead screw (without power crossfeed). Could I
        > simply machine a bushing to adapt a quick-change from a lathe with 3/4"
        > leadscrew?
        I think, maybe. Adapting the leadscrew is not likely to be the
        big problem. Yours is a "D" model, and I don't know how much is
        different there. Probably not much, but just somthing to worry
        over. The entire drive train from the just below the spindle
        gear is replaced in this changeover, so make sure you get the
        reversing tumbler and the "harp" bracket that holds the gear
        train. You can use your change gears to set up metric and
        special threads that the QC won't provide with the normal
        settings, so keep them.
        What kind of problems are likely to be encountered in
        > adapting the left side reversing mechanism, etc. I will value comments
        > and suggestions from those who have been through this.
        This is all part of the QC mechanism, and it should bolt onto
        most of the same brackets as the change-gear harp. The cover
        plates over the gears are totally different, however. But,
        those are not critical to making the lathe run.

        I did one of these conversions on a 10" "F" model (3/4" keyed
        leadscrew, with power crossfeed, etc.) and I had to fiddle with
        the index plate where the reversing lever detents were. This
        may have been due to the mounting position on the lathe, or wear
        in the gears (all used parts, but in excellent condition). It
        ran much quieter after adjusting that, but still typically noisy
        like an Atlas.

        Jon
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