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Re: screw cutting atlas 10 F

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  • Wally G.
    ... holding devise, thus far I ... start the cut with the tool ... down the machine ... up. I have cut other pitch ... and it only has screw ... I have also
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 4, 2006
      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Wally G." <dgehricke@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Wally G. wrote:
      > >
      > > >Hi all,
      > > > I have been trying to cut some very simple 1 1/2 X 8" work
      holding devise, thus far I
      > have
      > > >used 2 gear train set ups on my lathe. The problem is when I
      start the cut with the tool
      > > >advanced about .005-.008 the lathe spindle locks up when I shut
      down the machine
      > and
      > > >back ouyt the cutting tool it is the gear train that is locked
      up. I have cut other pitch
      > screws
      > > >before with out a problem. I have checked my Atlas lathe manual
      and it only has screw
      > > >cutting diagrams for the 6" and 12 " lathe the 10F is different,
      I have also conculted
      > the screw
      > > >cutting diagram inside my end cover and this is also confusing
      why is the #2 diagram
      > and the
      > > >actual #8 info different? Different gears are called for in the
      legend.
      > > >Any info or any help at this point would be greatly appricated.
      > > >P.S. these gears in the train also loosen up when running unless
      locked with an
      > additional
      > > >lock nut on the gears between the screw and the A position.
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > The correct gear ratio is 1:1 for 8 TPI. You want the leadscrew
      (8 TPI
      > > itself) to make exactly one
      > > revolution for each spindle revolution. This coarse a thread
      causes a
      > > lot of force on the gear
      > > train, and may be distorting the gear mounting bracket. This may
      force
      > > the gears against the
      > > nuts and start unscrewing them. With a worn set of gears, I can
      see you
      > > running into problems.
      > > Advancing the tool 5 to 8 thousandths may just be too much on a 10"
      > > Atlas, anyway.
      > >
      > > Since most of the gears here will be idlers anyway, the exact # of
      teeth
      > > doesn't matter.
      > > You have a choice of a 16 or 32 tooth gear on the spindle. Put a
      > > 32-tooth on the leadscrew
      > > shaft, and select the 32-tooth on the spindle. Then, select your
      > > best-looking gears for
      > > idlers, and put enough of them on the bracket to span the distance
      > > between the drive gear
      > > and the leadscrew gear.
      > >
      > > Note that the gear nuts are supposed to clamp down on the
      bushings, but
      > > allow the gear
      > > spacers to turn freely. If the bushings are worn, the nuts may
      start to
      > > clamp down on the
      > > spacers, causing all sorts of trouble. You can usually turn down the
      > > spacers a few thousandths
      > > to give clearance. You might check for this sort of trouble on your
      > > machine.
      > >
      > > Jon
      > >Jon,
      > Thanks for the heads up and the info , I'll give it a try today and
      I'll let you know how I
      > make out.
      > Thanks again
      > Regards
      > Wally G
      Jon,
      You were on the money, I found one of the bushings worn on the inside
      so bad I started to make an insert for it. I did check the gear train
      completely and all the gears are good but the main culprit seems to
      have been the bushing and some type of lubrication or the lack there
      of on the inside of the bushing,this also seems to have caused an
      excessive amount of ware making the problem worse.
      Thanks again for the push in the right direction.
      Regards
      Wally G
      >
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