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Moving lathes long distances

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  • Michael Darling
    Another newbie question for the group: In short, are these lathes worth moving across the country? Or should I look to sell and replace when I get to my new
    Message 1 of 12 , Aug 27, 2006
      Another newbie question for the group: In short, are these lathes
      worth moving across the country? Or should I look to sell and replace
      when I get to my new place?

      The long story: In the next year or so I will be moving from NJ back
      to Los Angeles, and I'm trying to figure out what to do with the
      tools down in the basement. I have a 6" 109.20630 in great condition
      with most of the accessories that I could easily sell at a nice
      profit. I've got a 10" TH42 in fair-good condition with virtually no
      accessories that I could easily turn around for what I've got into
      it. Neither are set up and running mainly due to school, lack of
      time, missing belts, not enough bench space, etc. Getting them set up
      will probably be a winter project could easily run ~$100 each in
      small purchases.

      I always hear how [good] old lathes are in short supply out west, and
      command a premium. Is exporting one from the northeast during the
      move worth it? Should I sell both of them and look for something like
      a really nice 6" atlas - a bit more serious than the 109 and easier
      to move than the TH42?

      So what would you do?

      -mike, in nJ with lots of questions
    • Brett Jones
      My sense is that there are more larger lathes out west than the smaller home/small shop tools. So-cal had a ton of aircraft industry, the Northwest has Boeing
      Message 2 of 12 , Aug 27, 2006
        My sense is that there are more larger lathes out west than the smaller
        home/small shop tools. So-cal had a ton of aircraft industry, the
        Northwest has Boeing and all it's sub contractors. Out west you may get
        lucky and score a deal on a 10-12" cabinet mounted machine to replace
        the 10-F.

        Michael Darling wrote:
        >
        >
        > Another newbie question for the group: In short, are these lathes
        > worth moving across the country? Or should I look to sell and replace
        > when I get to my new place?
        >
        > The long story: In the next year or so I will be moving from NJ back
        > to Los Angeles, and I'm trying to figure out what to do with the
        > tools down in the basement. I have a 6" 109.20630 in great condition
        > with most of the accessories that I could easily sell at a nice
        > profit. I've got a 10" TH42 in fair-good condition with virtually no
        > accessories that I could easily turn around for what I've got into
        > it. Neither are set up and running mainly due to school, lack of
        > time, missing belts, not enough bench space, etc. Getting them set up
        > will probably be a winter project could easily run ~$100 each in
        > small purchases.
        >
        > I always hear how [good] old lathes are in short supply out west, and
        > command a premium. Is exporting one from the northeast during the
        > move worth it? Should I sell both of them and look for something like
        > a really nice 6" atlas - a bit more serious than the 109 and easier
        > to move than the TH42?
        >
        > So what would you do?
        >
        > -mike, in nJ with lots of questions
        >
        >

        --
        Brett Jones
        brett@...
      • Buckshot
        Brett, Good theory, but people s experience doesn t seem to show that, though. The aircraft industry is NOT a seat and source for a lot of fancy machine tools,
        Message 3 of 12 , Aug 27, 2006
          Brett,

          Good theory, but people's experience doesn't seem to show that, though.

          The aircraft industry is NOT a seat and source for a lot of fancy machine
          tools, or at least the older ones you are talking about in So. Cal. were
          not. An aircraft is mostly sheet metal, with a good many of the complicated
          machined bits (engines, wheels, hubs, brakes, gear) contracted or purchased
          out.

          The military and the railroad are two good California sources for machine
          tools, but many of them will be too big for a home shop.

          A 9" - 12" machine is much more likely to be a toolroom, modelmakers or
          laboratory lathe than a production machine.

          14" - 20" is much more likely to be a production machine. Lathes like
          Logans, Cincinnati's, Monarchs and those brands are the most common lathes
          to be found and are actually the cheapest, IF you can deal with their size
          and weight, which many can't. Two of those are Ohio production, don't know
          where the Logans came from. There were many more from up east, also, such
          as Pratt and Whitney, which made all kinds of tools.

          New England through the Midwest "rust belt" are still the most likely places
          to find lathes, mills and many other non-CNC tools.

          Buckshot



          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Brett Jones" <brett@...>
          To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, August 28, 2006 12:23 AM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Moving lathes long distances


          > My sense is that there are more larger lathes out west than the smaller
          > home/small shop tools. So-cal had a ton of aircraft industry, the
          > Northwest has Boeing and all it's sub contractors. Out west you may get
          > lucky and score a deal on a 10-12" cabinet mounted machine to replace
          > the 10-F.
          >
          > Michael Darling wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Another newbie question for the group: In short, are these lathes
          > > worth moving across the country? Or should I look to sell and replace
          > > when I get to my new place?
          > >
          > > The long story: In the next year or so I will be moving from NJ back
          > > to Los Angeles, and I'm trying to figure out what to do with the
          > > tools down in the basement. I have a 6" 109.20630 in great condition
          > > with most of the accessories that I could easily sell at a nice
          > > profit. I've got a 10" TH42 in fair-good condition with virtually no
          > > accessories that I could easily turn around for what I've got into
          > > it. Neither are set up and running mainly due to school, lack of
          > > time, missing belts, not enough bench space, etc. Getting them set up
          > > will probably be a winter project could easily run ~$100 each in
          > > small purchases.
          > >
          > > I always hear how [good] old lathes are in short supply out west, and
          > > command a premium. Is exporting one from the northeast during the
          > > move worth it? Should I sell both of them and look for something like
          > > a really nice 6" atlas - a bit more serious than the 109 and easier
          > > to move than the TH42?
          > >
          > > So what would you do?
          > >
          > > -mike, in nJ with lots of questions
          > >
          > >
          >
          > --
          > Brett Jones
          > brett@...
          >
          >
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        • Michael Darling
          My fear is that when it comes to sourcing machines from industry surplus in LA, all of the old iron got traded in for CNC a long time ago. My needs are pretty
          Message 4 of 12 , Aug 27, 2006
            My fear is that when it comes to sourcing machines from industry
            surplus in LA, all of the old iron got traded in for CNC a long time
            ago.

            My needs are pretty simple at the moment, mostly just fabricating
            small parts for my electronics/audio/luthiery projects. I'm not
            really into model engines or live steam or anything intense (yet). A
            6" swing would do most of the work I'd like to get done in the next
            year, though there are a projects I have on my list that will need a
            10-12" swing with good threading capability or at least more change
            gears than the 3 that came with my TH42. When I get back to LA there
            is a collection of MGs (old British cars, NOT firearms) that I'd like
            to help my father restore during his retirement so something larger
            than a 6" swing would be ideal.

            Is the demand for small lathes that great in SoCal? Would it be
            worthwhile smuggling a 109 or 6" Atlas into the state and putting it
            on the market out there? :)

            -mike



            On Aug 28, 2006, at 12:42 AM, Buckshot wrote
            > The aircraft industry is NOT a seat and source for a lot of fancy
            > machine
            > tools, or at least the older ones you are talking about in So. Cal.
            > were
            > not. An aircraft is mostly sheet metal, with a good many of the
            > complicated
            > machined bits (engines, wheels, hubs, brakes, gear) contracted or
            > purchased
            > out.
          • Bob May
            If you re going with a furniture moving company for the move, most definitely bring the lathes. They re something that you know and are used to. If you re
            Message 5 of 12 , Aug 28, 2006
              If you're going with a furniture moving company for the move,
              most definitely bring the lathes. They're something that you
              know and are used to. If you're doing a U-Haul, it kind of
              depends upon how much you want to pull but I'd prefer to bring
              the lathes for the above reasons.
              There may not be as many lathes out here but then again, the
              turners are less out here also.
              Bob May
              bobmay at nethere.com
              http: slash /nav.to slash bobmay
              http: slash /bobmay dot astronomy.net
              Replace the obvious words with the proper character.
            • LouD31M066@aol.com
              Aircraft industry sent machine work to Detroit because they got the work done for le$$. Reason being auto industry cluster of small and medium suppliers with
              Message 6 of 12 , Aug 28, 2006
                Aircraft industry sent machine work to Detroit because they got the work
                done for le$$.
                Reason being auto industry cluster of small and medium suppliers with
                Machines and skilled workers who were used to quality in a hurry work.At one time
                25% of skilled metal workers
                were employed in Detroit Metro Area.
                Louis


                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • John D.L. Johnson
                Michael, I would bring them with you. I brought my 12 x36 101.28990 with me when I moved from California to Florida four years ago. My wife and I have
                Message 7 of 12 , Aug 28, 2006
                  Michael,

                  I would bring them with you. I brought my 12 x36 101.28990 with me when I
                  moved from California to Florida four years ago. My wife and I have
                  wondered why we brought some of the stuff we did 3,250 miles, but I have
                  never thought that about any of my tools or trains!! I was lucky to buy my
                  lathe from a fellow live steam club member in CA, who was the original
                  owner. Other than that there was not much that I ran into for sale in
                  Northern CA where lived. Another club member found a 6" Craftsman on eBay
                  and drove all the way to Salt Lake City to pick it up.

                  John D.L. Johnson
                  3879 Woods Walk Blvd.
                  Lake Worth, FL 33467-2359
                  jjohnson@...
                  www.LocoGear.com

                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Michael Darling" <miked2002@...>
                  To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Sunday, August 27, 2006 11:58 PM
                  Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Moving lathes long distances


                  > Another newbie question for the group: In short, are these lathes
                  > worth moving across the country? Or should I look to sell and replace
                  > when I get to my new place?
                  >
                  > The long story: In the next year or so I will be moving from NJ back
                  > to Los Angeles, and I'm trying to figure out what to do with the
                  > tools down in the basement. I have a 6" 109.20630 in great condition
                  > with most of the accessories that I could easily sell at a nice
                  > profit. I've got a 10" TH42 in fair-good condition with virtually no
                  > accessories that I could easily turn around for what I've got into
                  > it. Neither are set up and running mainly due to school, lack of
                  > time, missing belts, not enough bench space, etc. Getting them set up
                  > will probably be a winter project could easily run ~$100 each in
                  > small purchases.
                  >
                  > I always hear how [good] old lathes are in short supply out west, and
                  > command a premium. Is exporting one from the northeast during the
                  > move worth it? Should I sell both of them and look for something like
                  > a really nice 6" atlas - a bit more serious than the 109 and easier
                  > to move than the TH42?
                  >
                  > So what would you do?
                  >
                  > -mike, in nJ with lots of questions
                  >
                  >
                  > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                  > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                  > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  >
                  > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
                  >
                  > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
                  > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
                  > Yahoo! Groups Links
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                • jerdal
                  ... know ... Logan is nice, and heavier that Atlas, but definitely does NOT rate with the others mentioned. For some reason Logan s are fairly common in LA,
                  Message 8 of 12 , Aug 28, 2006
                    > 14" - 20" is much more likely to be a production machine. Lathes like
                    > Logans, Cincinnati's, Monarchs and those brands are the most common lathes
                    > to be found and are actually the cheapest, IF you can deal with their size
                    > and weight, which many can't. Two of those are Ohio production, don't
                    know
                    > where the Logans came from. There were many more from up east, also, such
                    > as Pratt and Whitney, which made all kinds of tools.

                    Logan is nice, and heavier that Atlas, but definitely does NOT rate with the
                    others mentioned.

                    For some reason Logan's are fairly common in LA, apparently. 10" and the
                    real goodie, 11" Logans do seem to show up. They came from Chicago.

                    I'd ditch the 109, and try to buy something nicer in that size later, like
                    an Atlas 6", or even Sherline etc. Had a 109, ditched it, haven't looked
                    back.

                    The other, go ahead and move it. But move that yourself. The furniture
                    movers will likely break it, and then won't pay. I had movers move
                    electronics across town, and that was a mistake.

                    JT



                    --
                    No virus found in this outgoing message.
                    Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                    Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.11.6/430 - Release Date: 08/28/2006
                  • Jim Ash
                    Once upon a time, movers packed and moved my Sherline lathe. When I found it, it was thrown into a box vertically with the headstock up and the lead screw
                    Message 9 of 12 , Aug 29, 2006
                      Once upon a time, movers packed and moved my Sherline lathe. When I found it, it was thrown into a box vertically with the headstock up and the lead screw handwheel on the bottom of the box. It wasn't damaged, but I don't know why. Never again. I don't think the movers understood the delicate nature of the equipment. Even as massive as a surface plate can be, I treat mine gingerly. At a minimum, I'd pack (and pad) my equipment before I let them move it. That might include some disassembly which the packers/movers probably wouldn't do. We've pre-packed boxes for several commercial moves and nobody ever said anything.

                      Jim Ash


                      -----Original Message-----
                      >From: jerdal <jerdal@...>
                      >Sent: Aug 28, 2006 10:20 PM
                      >To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                      >Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Moving lathes long distances
                      >
                      >> 14" - 20" is much more likely to be a production machine. Lathes like
                      >> Logans, Cincinnati's, Monarchs and those brands are the most common lathes
                      >> to be found and are actually the cheapest, IF you can deal with their size
                      >> and weight, which many can't. Two of those are Ohio production, don't
                      >know
                      >> where the Logans came from. There were many more from up east, also, such
                      >> as Pratt and Whitney, which made all kinds of tools.
                      >
                      >Logan is nice, and heavier that Atlas, but definitely does NOT rate with the
                      >others mentioned.
                      >
                      >For some reason Logan's are fairly common in LA, apparently. 10" and the
                      >real goodie, 11" Logans do seem to show up. They came from Chicago.
                      >
                      >I'd ditch the 109, and try to buy something nicer in that size later, like
                      >an Atlas 6", or even Sherline etc. Had a 109, ditched it, haven't looked
                      >back.
                      >
                      >The other, go ahead and move it. But move that yourself. The furniture
                      >movers will likely break it, and then won't pay. I had movers move
                      >electronics across town, and that was a mistake.
                      >
                      >JT
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      >--
                      >No virus found in this outgoing message.
                      >Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                      >Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.11.6/430 - Release Date: 08/28/2006
                      >
                    • w1cvw
                      Jim Over the years I have made a number of corporate moves. I thought I was helping myself by packing some items so it would be done right . The movers marked
                      Message 10 of 12 , Aug 29, 2006
                        Jim

                        Over the years I have made a number of corporate moves. I thought I was helping myself by packing some items so it would be done "right". The movers marked each of these boxes "CP" and indicated it on the bill of lading. When I asked what this meant I was told it means customer packed. And then he added if anything in that box was damaged they would not cover it with their insurance. So I asked him what the best way to make sure certain things were packed so no damage would occur. He said to specify the items and (for extra cost) they would pack them in a special way to better protect the item.

                        It has been my experience that for moves about half way across the country it cost about 50 cents per pound. That was a few years ago.

                        FWIT,

                        Clem

                        ... At a minimum, I'd pack (and pad) my equipment before I let them move it. That might include some disassembly which the packers/movers probably wouldn't do. We've pre-packed boxes for several commercial moves and nobody ever said anything.

                        Jim Ash

                        ----------

                        No virus found in this outgoing message.
                        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                        Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.11.6/430 - Release Date: 8/28/2006


                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • John D.L. Johnson
                        When I moved from CA to FL four years ago it was about 60-cents per pound with a name brand household moving company. Probably more now with higher oil
                        Message 11 of 12 , Aug 29, 2006
                          When I moved from CA to FL four years ago it was about 60-cents per pound
                          with a name brand household moving company. Probably more now with higher
                          oil prices. I had a good experience with the company. However, I would say
                          that it all comes down to the person who shows up to actually do the move.
                          I felt very comfortable with the van driver we got because he really knew
                          what he was doing and how to manage his loading crew. He was a retired Air
                          Force officer and made sure his loading crew, all of whom were local people,
                          did what they were supposed to do and packed the truck right. He had been
                          out of the military for nearly 20 years and in the moving business since,
                          but he was still that AF officer giving orders to his men!

                          I had a long talk with the van driver before loading about my tools and how
                          he would pack them in the truck. I had the Atlas/Craftsman 101.28990 and my
                          Shopsmith 501. The van driver said he would build a platform over these two
                          pieces of equipment so that nothing would be stacked on top of either. This
                          he did, I saw it go together. I removed most of what I could on both pieces
                          of equipment except for the head stocks and carriages. All of the stuff
                          like handles, center rests, tail stocks, tool posts were put into boxes.
                          The only thing that I wished I had done, but ran out of time to do was to
                          place a piece of plywood on top of the exposed ways on the Atlas. When we
                          got to FL, there was a hand print etched in to the way on one side where a
                          sweaty hand had grabbed hold to move it at some point. This eventually wore
                          off, so now it can not be seen, but it did bug me for a while.

                          I think that you really have to engage yourself in to the process. Talk
                          with the people that are doing the job and make sure that you are there to
                          watch what they are doing and how they are doing it.

                          John D.L. Johnson
                          3879 Woods Walk Blvd.
                          Lake Worth, FL 33467-2359
                          jjohnson@...
                          www.LocoGear.com

                          ----- Original Message -----
                          From: "w1cvw" <w1cvw@...>
                          To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Tuesday, August 29, 2006 7:06 PM
                          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Moving lathes long distances


                          > Jim
                          >
                          > Over the years I have made a number of corporate moves. I thought I was
                          > helping myself by packing some items so it would be done "right". The
                          > movers marked each of these boxes "CP" and indicated it on the bill of
                          > lading. When I asked what this meant I was told it means customer packed.
                          > And then he added if anything in that box was damaged they would not cover
                          > it with their insurance. So I asked him what the best way to make sure
                          > certain things were packed so no damage would occur. He said to specify
                          > the items and (for extra cost) they would pack them in a special way to
                          > better protect the item.
                          >
                          > It has been my experience that for moves about half way across the country
                          > it cost about 50 cents per pound. That was a few years ago.
                          >
                          > FWIT,
                          >
                          > Clem
                          >
                          > ... At a minimum, I'd pack (and pad) my equipment before I let them move
                          > it. That might include some disassembly which the packers/movers probably
                          > wouldn't do. We've pre-packed boxes for several commercial moves and
                          > nobody ever said anything.
                          >
                          > Jim Ash
                          >
                          > ----------
                          >
                          > No virus found in this outgoing message.
                          > Checked by AVG Free Edition.
                          > Version: 7.1.405 / Virus Database: 268.11.6/430 - Release Date: 8/28/2006
                          >
                          >
                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          >
                          >
                          >
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                          >
                        • Michael Darling
                          Just wanted to thank everyone for sharing their experiences! I m taking notes and doing some serious thinking about what s going to to get sold to finance the
                          Message 12 of 12 , Aug 29, 2006
                            Just wanted to thank everyone for sharing their experiences! I'm
                            taking notes and doing some serious thinking about what's going to to
                            get sold to finance the move and what's worth packing up for a cross-
                            country trip. Luckily I still have a year or so to figure it all out!

                            -mike in Nj
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