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Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?

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  • Lou Balleweg
    I have a Dremel tool that I adapted to mount in place of the tool post on my Craftsman 618. I use it for drilling small holes, evenly spaced around the
    Message 1 of 21 , Jul 2, 2006
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      I have a Dremel tool that I adapted to mount in place of the tool
      post on my Craftsman 618. I use it for drilling small holes, evenly
      spaced around the perimeter of parts, using the headstock index. You
      can use the index for anything similar.
      If you are interested in the adapter, I can send you pitures of it.
      Regards,
      LouBalleweg@...

      What's the indexing function of the headstock
      > used for?
    • John D.L. Johnson
      I used mine to setup to drill holes. Take a look at my LocoGear Technical Bulletin - 14 on my web site. On page 4 you can see a simple setup that I did using
      Message 2 of 21 , Jul 2, 2006
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        I used mine to setup to drill holes. Take a look at my LocoGear Technical
        Bulletin - 14 on my web site. On page 4 you can see a simple setup that I
        did using the indexing of the bull gear to drill rivet holes equally spaced
        around a round cylinder. I also used the same setup to drill the rivet
        holes around both ends of my boiler smoke box on my live steam Shay
        locomotive. That will be in a yet unpublished LocoGear Technical Bulletin.
        Unfortunatley for my smoke box, the prototype used 32 rivets, but the bull
        gear only has 60 holes. Thus my smoke box only has 30 rivets to hold it
        together!

        John D.L. Johnson
        3879 Woods Walk Blvd.
        Lake Worth, FL 33467-2359
        jjohnson@...
        www.LocoGear.com
      • William Abernathy
        ... I rigged up a drill jig through one of my boring bar holders and used the indexing feature to hand-drill drive holes at 120 and 90-degree angles into a
        Message 3 of 21 , Jul 2, 2006
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          joegourlay wrote:
          > Question for you guys. What's the indexing function of the headstock
          > used for? I ask becuase I had always assumed it was so you could cut
          > flutes. But then, I was poking around today and couldn't figure out a
          > way to use the powerfeed on the saddle with the headstock locked.
          >
          > Can someone clue me in?

          I rigged up a drill jig through one of my boring bar holders and used the
          indexing feature to hand-drill drive holes at 120 and 90-degree angles into a
          home-made collet chuck (these holes are to fit a spanner wrench). Worked like a
          charm.

          --W
        • Steve
          Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for
          Message 4 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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            Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).

            For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that attaches to the QC toolpost.

            Steve


            >3d. Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?
            > Posted by: "Dave Mucha" dave_mucha@... dave_mucha
            > Date: Sun Jul 2, 2006 8:56 am (PDT)
            >
            >--- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> I'm starting to think I need to get serious about my idea of finding
            >> a way to mount a 1 or 1/2 HP motor on my saddle.
            >>
            >> Sort of unrelated question though. WHY are tool post grinders so
            >> gawd awful expensive?
            >>
            >
            >scarceity
            >
            >Check out the $199 one at little machine shop.
            >
            >mini-lathe motor
            >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1275
            >
            >or the $99 one, sewing machine motor
            >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2001
            >
            >
            >I have a Dumore, a Thermac, and 2 that I built myself. One for me and
            >one for a friend.
            >
            >It is pretty easy, just use high quality bearings.
            >
            >A double angular contact bearing on one end is advised,
            >
            >
            >
            >Dave
            >


            ________________________________________
            PeoplePC Online
            A better way to Internet
            http://www.peoplepc.com
          • Glenn N
            I made an aluminum sleeve for the boring bar holder and the HF mini die grinder (pencile style) slips right into it. Add a valve inline and you have on/off
            Message 5 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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              I made an aluminum sleeve for the boring bar holder and the HF mini die grinder (pencile style) slips right into it. Add a valve inline and you have on/off speed control. Works nicely for small interneal work especially. I have a Dumore TPG that works for the bigger stuff and outside work.
              Glenn
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: Steve
              To: Atlas Group
              Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 4:46 AM
              Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?


              Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).

              For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that attaches to the QC toolpost.

              Steve

              >3d. Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?
              > Posted by: "Dave Mucha" dave_mucha@... dave_mucha
              > Date: Sun Jul 2, 2006 8:56 am (PDT)
              >
              >--- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...> wrote:
              >>
              >> I'm starting to think I need to get serious about my idea of finding
              >> a way to mount a 1 or 1/2 HP motor on my saddle.
              >>
              >> Sort of unrelated question though. WHY are tool post grinders so
              >> gawd awful expensive?
              >>
              >
              >scarceity
              >
              >Check out the $199 one at little machine shop.
              >
              >mini-lathe motor
              >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1275
              >
              >or the $99 one, sewing machine motor
              >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2001
              >
              >
              >I have a Dumore, a Thermac, and 2 that I built myself. One for me and
              >one for a friend.
              >
              >It is pretty easy, just use high quality bearings.
              >
              >A double angular contact bearing on one end is advised,
              >
              >
              >
              >Dave
              >

              ________________________________________
              PeoplePC Online
              A better way to Internet
              http://www.peoplepc.com




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Jon Elson
              ... Yup, I have a TheMac T.P. grinder, and the motor is so well balanced there is absolutely no sensation it is running if you hold it in your hand. I ve
              Message 6 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                Steve wrote:

                >Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).
                >
                >For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that attaches to the QC toolpost.
                >
                >
                Yup, I have a TheMac T.P. grinder, and the motor is so well balanced
                there is
                absolutely no sensation it is running if you hold it in your hand. I've
                never
                gotten the grinding wheels well balanced enough so it will run that smooth
                with a wheel mounted, though.

                Jon
              • BRUCE ROGERS
                I did this too. The HF die grinder is 5/8 inch o.d. and perfectly matches the QC-II boring bar holder. Unfortunately, I don t think that the bearings in the
                Message 7 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                  I did this too. The HF die grinder is 5/8 inch o.d. and perfectly matches the QC-II boring bar holder.

                  Unfortunately, I don't think that the bearings in the pencil die grinder are up to the job. I was very disappointed in the finish that I could achieve.

                  Bruce
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Glenn N
                  To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 9:03 AM
                  Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?


                  I made an aluminum sleeve for the boring bar holder and the HF mini die grinder (pencile style) slips right into it. Add a valve inline and you have on/off speed control. Works nicely for small interneal work especially. I have a Dumore TPG that works for the bigger stuff and outside work.
                  Glenn
                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: Steve
                  To: Atlas Group
                  Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 4:46 AM
                  Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?

                  Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).

                  For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that attaches to the QC toolpost.

                  Steve

                  >3d. Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?
                  > Posted by: "Dave Mucha" dave_mucha@... dave_mucha
                  > Date: Sun Jul 2, 2006 8:56 am (PDT)
                  >
                  >--- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...> wrote:
                  >>
                  >> I'm starting to think I need to get serious about my idea of finding
                  >> a way to mount a 1 or 1/2 HP motor on my saddle.
                  >>
                  >> Sort of unrelated question though. WHY are tool post grinders so
                  >> gawd awful expensive?
                  >>
                  >
                  >scarceity
                  >
                  >Check out the $199 one at little machine shop.
                  >
                  >mini-lathe motor
                  >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1275
                  >
                  >or the $99 one, sewing machine motor
                  >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2001
                  >
                  >
                  >I have a Dumore, a Thermac, and 2 that I built myself. One for me and
                  >one for a friend.
                  >
                  >It is pretty easy, just use high quality bearings.
                  >
                  >A double angular contact bearing on one end is advised,
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >Dave
                  >

                  ________________________________________
                  PeoplePC Online
                  A better way to Internet
                  http://www.peoplepc.com

                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Glenn N
                  Did you dress the stone first? I had a poor finish with several stones but a good one dressed properly left a nice finish. Visually the same as the finish I
                  Message 8 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                    Did you dress the stone first? I had a poor finish with several stones but a good one dressed properly left a nice finish. Visually the same as the finish I get with the Dumore.
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: BRUCE ROGERS
                    To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 9:32 AM
                    Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?


                    I did this too. The HF die grinder is 5/8 inch o.d. and perfectly matches the QC-II boring bar holder.

                    Unfortunately, I don't think that the bearings in the pencil die grinder are up to the job. I was very disappointed in the finish that I could achieve.

                    Bruce
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Glenn N
                    To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
                    Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 9:03 AM
                    Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?

                    I made an aluminum sleeve for the boring bar holder and the HF mini die grinder (pencile style) slips right into it. Add a valve inline and you have on/off speed control. Works nicely for small interneal work especially. I have a Dumore TPG that works for the bigger stuff and outside work.
                    Glenn
                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: Steve
                    To: Atlas Group
                    Sent: Monday, July 03, 2006 4:46 AM
                    Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?

                    Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).

                    For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that attaches to the QC toolpost.

                    Steve

                    >3d. Re: Indexing the headstock? What's it good for?
                    > Posted by: "Dave Mucha" dave_mucha@... dave_mucha
                    > Date: Sun Jul 2, 2006 8:56 am (PDT)
                    >
                    >--- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...> wrote:
                    >>
                    >> I'm starting to think I need to get serious about my idea of finding
                    >> a way to mount a 1 or 1/2 HP motor on my saddle.
                    >>
                    >> Sort of unrelated question though. WHY are tool post grinders so
                    >> gawd awful expensive?
                    >>
                    >
                    >scarceity
                    >
                    >Check out the $199 one at little machine shop.
                    >
                    >mini-lathe motor
                    >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=1275
                    >
                    >or the $99 one, sewing machine motor
                    >http://www.littlemachineshop.com/products/product_view.php?ProductID=2001
                    >
                    >
                    >I have a Dumore, a Thermac, and 2 that I built myself. One for me and
                    >one for a friend.
                    >
                    >It is pretty easy, just use high quality bearings.
                    >
                    >A double angular contact bearing on one end is advised,
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >Dave
                    >

                    ________________________________________
                    PeoplePC Online
                    A better way to Internet
                    http://www.peoplepc.com

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]

                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]





                    [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  • Dave Miller
                    When I bought my lathe, it came with a home made bracket to hold a 1/4 electric die grinder, as well as a speed contoller. It works better than the Dremel
                    Message 9 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                      When I bought my lathe, it came with a home made bracket to hold a
                      1/4" electric die grinder, as well as a speed contoller. It works
                      better than the Dremel mount I used on my other lathe, but it's not
                      nearly as precise as a proper tool post grinder. It's fine for most
                      of the hobby work I do. I got several collets for it and it works
                      good for drilling and even light milling.

                      dave
                      florida



                      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, William Abernathy
                      <william@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > joegourlay wrote:
                      > > Question for you guys. What's the indexing function of the
                      headstock
                      > > used for? I ask becuase I had always assumed it was so you could
                      cut
                      > > flutes. But then, I was poking around today and couldn't figure
                      out a
                      > > way to use the powerfeed on the saddle with the headstock locked.
                      > >
                      > > Can someone clue me in?
                      >
                      > I rigged up a drill jig through one of my boring bar holders and
                      used the
                      > indexing feature to hand-drill drive holes at 120 and 90-degree
                      angles into a
                      > home-made collet chuck (these holes are to fit a spanner wrench).
                      Worked like a
                      > charm.
                      >
                      > --W
                      >
                    • Dave Mucha
                      ... devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle). ... Dave s), a
                      Message 10 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Steve wrote:
                        >
                        > >Unlike a Dremel tool, tool post grinders are really super-precision
                        devices. Any vibration or wobble will produce a finish that might not
                        be acceptable for real precision work (e.g. a high-speed spindle).
                        > >
                        > >For many of our purposes, a homemade one with good bearings (like
                        Dave's), a Dremel or something similar may be suitable. I may make a
                        mount for a flexible shaft or my dremel, as the Atlas tool post
                        grinder I have is pretty bulky. Thinking of making something that
                        attaches to the QC toolpost.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > Yup, I have a TheMac T.P. grinder, and the motor is so well balanced
                        > there is
                        > absolutely no sensation it is running if you hold it in your hand.
                        I've
                        > never
                        > gotten the grinding wheels well balanced enough so it will run that
                        smooth
                        > with a wheel mounted, though.
                        >
                        > Jon
                        >

                        I'm still working on that too.

                        I bought a diamond grinding wheel dresser and when I get to the part
                        of the project that needs grinding, I'll be trying to figure out how
                        to get the wheel as true as possible.

                        Dave
                      • Dave Mucha
                        ... When grinding, the finest wheel will leave the best finish. a fine wheel that wobbles will leave a finish like that of a very coarse wheel. Also, a wheel
                        Message 11 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Dave Miller"
                          <davemiller1590@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > When I bought my lathe, it came with a home made bracket to hold a
                          > 1/4" electric die grinder, as well as a speed contoller. It works
                          > better than the Dremel mount I used on my other lathe, but it's not
                          > nearly as precise as a proper tool post grinder. It's fine for most
                          > of the hobby work I do. I got several collets for it and it works
                          > good for drilling and even light milling.
                          >
                          > dave
                          > florida

                          When grinding, the finest wheel will leave the best finish. a fine
                          wheel that wobbles will leave a finish like that of a very coarse wheel.

                          Also, a wheel that has been trued up will be able to take smaller
                          bites as the wheels that are not trued up will dig instead of skim.

                          Dave
                        • Jon Elson
                          ... I grip the diamond dressing point between two chuck jaws and pass the grinding wheel across it. That dresses the wheel true to it s own roation, and maybe
                          Message 12 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                            Dave Mucha wrote:

                            >I bought a diamond grinding wheel dresser and when I get to the part
                            >of the project that needs grinding, I'll be trying to figure out how
                            >to get the wheel as true as possible.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            I grip the diamond dressing point between two chuck jaws and pass the
                            grinding
                            wheel across it. That dresses the wheel true to it's own roation, and
                            maybe helps
                            imbalance a bit, but it really doesn't balance the grinding spindle.
                            That has been
                            good enough for me so far. It may be that my arbors, etc. have been beat up
                            enough that they no longer run perfectly true.

                            Jon
                          • Dave Mucha
                            ... beat up ... I found that my wheels that use rubber spacers tend to true up the center of the wheel, and that the 3/8 or 1/2 wheels have too much of a gap
                            Message 13 of 21 , Jul 3, 2006
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                              --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Dave Mucha wrote:
                              >
                              > >I bought a diamond grinding wheel dresser and when I get to the part
                              > >of the project that needs grinding, I'll be trying to figure out how
                              > >to get the wheel as true as possible.
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > I grip the diamond dressing point between two chuck jaws and pass the
                              > grinding
                              > wheel across it. That dresses the wheel true to it's own roation, and
                              > maybe helps
                              > imbalance a bit, but it really doesn't balance the grinding spindle.
                              > That has been
                              > good enough for me so far. It may be that my arbors, etc. have been
                              beat up
                              > enough that they no longer run perfectly true.
                              >
                              > Jon

                              I found that my wheels that use rubber spacers tend to true up the
                              center of the wheel, and that the 3/8 or 1/2 wheels have too much of a
                              gap between the wheel and the shaft and they do not sit tight.

                              Small wheels seem to have less mass and less vibration when they are
                              not perfectly balanced.

                              Dave




                              Dave
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