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Re: [atlas_craftsman] lathe base wheel/rim polishing

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  • Steven Harris
    It all depends on how much energy you want to spend building something that only has one purpose. You could always do it the old fashioned way. I watched my
    Message 1 of 18 , Mar 31, 2006
      It all depends on how much energy you want to spend building something
      that only has one purpose. You could always do it the old fashioned way.
      I watched my dad polish the rough cast magnesium rims for his drag car
      in the evenings for a couple months until they were mirror bright. On
      the other hand I watched a guy turn brake rotors on his truck by
      mounting the raw steel on the wheel hub and running the truck at an
      idle. He used a compound mounted on a floor jack.

      Steve

      Adam Meister wrote:

      >Oh sure, another "my lathe's bigger than your lathe comment." Interesting
      >idea about using the rear axle flange or the whole rear end. I've considered
      >either using an axle flange or turning a universal mount for different bolt
      >patterns on the lathe. I had then planned on mounting the adapter to a
      >pulley that would be motor/jackshaft driven on some sort of lumber based
      >table. I figured I could mount a work surface level with the center line of
      >the wheel to aid in polishing it. Well, this thought got me thinking about
      >mounting a compound assembly to the table somehow, possibly by removing the
      >tailstock off the lathe and taking the compound to the end of the bed. I'm
      >just not sure if idea would end up being some sort of Rube Goldberg type of
      >overly complex device, or if it may actually work.
      >
      >Adam
      >
      >
      >
      >>From: Steven Harris <79ramcharger@...>
      >>Reply-To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      >>To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      >>Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] lathe base wheel/rim polishing
      >>Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2006 18:39:48 -0800
      >>
      >>I'm doing something similar. I mounted an old axle in the chuck and then
      >>bolted the wheel to the axle flange. Did a couple of adjustments so that
      >>the wheel would spin true. But then I also have access to my buddy's big
      >>lathe.
      >>
      >>Steve
      >>
      >>amsvette wrote:
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >>>Hey, a quick question for the mases. I have several sets of aluminum
      >>>rims for my many project cars that all need polishing. I couldn't help
      >>>looking at my lathe and wondering if there was anyway I could make a
      >>>fixture to either polish or re-turn the wheels. I've seen one picture
      >>>of a rim mounted on a lathe type machine for recutting the face and it
      >>>didn't look to be more than a fixture to mount the wheel and a tool
      >>>holder on a compound to do the turning. It would be nice if I had a
      >>>lathe big enough to turn a 15"-16" chunk of aluminum, but I don't
      >>>think my 12" Craftsman will do.
      >>>
      >>>Does anyone have any thoughts or ideas, or an I stuck with hand
      >>>sanding and polishing?
      >>>
      >>>Thanks,
      >>>Adam
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
      >>>
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    • Adam Meister
      Not too far off from what I m trying to do. I have three sets of snowflake wheels for my 78 Trans Am that I d like to redo. I ve seen hand polished wheels and
      Message 2 of 18 , Apr 1, 2006
        Not too far off from what I'm trying to do. I have three sets of snowflake
        wheels for my '78 Trans Am that I'd like to redo. I've seen hand polished
        wheels and they tend to be too shiny for my taste. I like the look of a
        freshly turned wheel, but I don't want to spend the $1000 to buy a set that
        have been done. That's another interesting idea for mounting the wheels for
        polishing though, it should work for my "used to be polished" Centerline
        wheels.


        >From: "KDSpriggs" <kdspriggs@...>
        >Reply-To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        >To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
        >Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: lathe base wheel/rim polishing
        >Date: Sat, 01 Apr 2006 05:38:55 -0000
        >
        >--- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "amsvette" <adamandjen@...>
        >wrote:
        > >
        > > Hey, a quick question for the mases. I have several sets of aluminum
        > > rims for my many project cars that all need polishing.
        > >
        > > Does anyone have any thoughts or ideas, or an I stuck with hand
        > > sanding and polishing?
        > >
        > > Thanks,
        > > Adam
        > >
        >
        >Here is a possible idea. If you can come up with an old belt vee or
        >flat that would be long enough to go around the tire and down to an
        >electric motor with a pulley. The motor would only need to be mounted
        >on a board with enough weight to hold it it down. Use on front wheel
        >assuming rear wheel drive car. Jack the front wheel up far enough to
        >clear the floor. The wheel would not turn very fast with any pulley
        >that you are likely to come up for the motor. I have never tried this
        >and have no idea how it would work. I restored a 79 TA with the cast
        >honeycomb wheels I just polished them by hand. Lots of work.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
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      • Adam Meister
        Well, I suppose while I m at it I can make the car front wheel drive also! An all wheel drive Trans Am might be cool. I ve considered using this idea as I ve
        Message 3 of 18 , Apr 1, 2006
          Well, I suppose while I'm at it I can make the car front wheel drive also!
          An all wheel drive Trans Am might be cool. I've considered using this idea
          as I've heard it works for re-doing Moon wheel discs, but I think I enjoy
          having all of my fingers attatched to my hands! I think I'll still try it
          before I start investing in any expensive parts for a machine that may not
          work.

          Adam


          >From: "BRUCE ROGERS" <brogers1@...>
          >Reply-To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
          >To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
          >Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] lathe base wheel/rim polishing
          >Date: Fri, 31 Mar 2006 21:15:40 -0800
          >
          >How about leaving the rims on the car, jacking up one wheel and putting the
          >car in gear. The lifted wheel will spin and you can polish it as it spins.
          >Now for the front end, that's a different story I suppose. ;-)
          >
          >Bruce
          >----- Original Message -----
          >From: "Steven Harris" <79ramcharger@...>
          >To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
          >Sent: Friday, March 31, 2006 6:44 PM
          >Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] lathe base wheel/rim polishing
          >
          >
          > > Hmmm. How about taking a complete rear-end. mount the wheel as normal.
          > > Then spin the wheel by running an impact on the yoke nut. Then hand
          > > polish with your favorite polish as it spins. This would of course take
          > > two people.
          > >
          > > Steve
          > >
          > > Michael Fagan wrote:
          > >
          > > >Theoretically this kind of work could be accomplished on a brake lathe
          >used
          > > >for facing and turning of brake rotors and drums. I believe they can
          >handle
          > > >rather large work, especially ones designed for larger car and truck
          > > >brakes. They hold work on a cone-shaped mandrel rather than a chuck.
          >Some
          > > >have twin facing tools that face both sides of a rotor at the same
          >time,
          >and
          > > >an extremely ridgid tool for turning the inside of a drum.
          > > >Also for polishing work it wouldn't seem that necessary to have a full
          >lathe
          > > >setup. I would think you could get by with a motor and mandrel to hold
          >and
          > > >spin the wheel, perhaps with belts to slow the speed. A tool rest to
          >hold
          > > >fine abrasive followed by a buffing wheel would seem to work. Minor
          >gouges
          > > >or dents could be filed out either first or under power.
          > > >Hope these ideas are useful
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >On 3/31/06, amsvette <adamandjen@...> wrote:
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >>Hey, a quick question for the mases. I have several sets of aluminum
          > > >>rims for my many project cars that all need polishing. I couldn't help
          > > >>looking at my lathe and wondering if there was anyway I could make a
          > > >>fixture to either polish or re-turn the wheels. I've seen one picture
          > > >>of a rim mounted on a lathe type machine for recutting the face and it
          > > >>didn't look to be more than a fixture to mount the wheel and a tool
          > > >>holder on a compound to do the turning. It would be nice if I had a
          > > >>lathe big enough to turn a 15"-16" chunk of aluminum, but I don't
          > > >>think my 12" Craftsman will do.
          > > >>
          > > >>Does anyone have any thoughts or ideas, or an I stuck with hand
          > > >>sanding and polishing?
          > > >>
          > > >>Thanks,
          > > >>Adam
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
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          > > >>atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          > > >>
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          > > >>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
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          > > >>http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
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          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >>
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >--
          > > >"To go where no [sane] man has gone before"
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
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          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          > > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
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        • Jon Elson
          ... Ohh, this reminds me of the scroozler or therabouts, for splitting logs. It was a huge wood-screw looking thing that you attached to a driving wheel like
          Message 4 of 18 , Apr 1, 2006
            BRUCE ROGERS wrote:

            >How about leaving the rims on the car, jacking up one wheel and putting the
            >car in gear. The lifted wheel will spin and you can polish it as it spins.
            >Now for the front end, that's a different story I suppose. ;-)
            >
            >
            Ohh, this reminds me of the "scroozler" or therabouts, for splitting logs.
            It was a huge wood-screw looking thing that you attached to a driving
            wheel like that, and you shoved logs against the point. I could think
            of about
            10 ways things could go wrong the first time I saw the picture in a
            magazine.
            Most of those involved a bloody mess. The rest had a guy chasing his
            car through
            a forest.

            On a practical note, differentials are not really made for having one wheel
            locked and the other wheel turning. The pinions turn really fast even at
            idle speed, and they are just iron on a steel pin.

            You could always jack up a front wheel and spin the tire with a motor.

            Jon
          • n5kzw
            Awhile back, there was a fellah around here that had himself a 4WD Vette (Stingray). It was a pretty odd sight. Ed ... also! ... this idea ... enjoy ... try
            Message 5 of 18 , Apr 2, 2006
              Awhile back, there was a fellah around here that had himself a 4WD
              'Vette (Stingray). It was a pretty odd sight.

              Ed
              --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Adam Meister"
              <adamandjen@...> wrote:
              >
              > Well, I suppose while I'm at it I can make the car front wheel drive
              also!
              > An all wheel drive Trans Am might be cool. I've considered using
              this idea
              > as I've heard it works for re-doing Moon wheel discs, but I think I
              enjoy
              > having all of my fingers attatched to my hands! I think I'll still
              try it
              > before I start investing in any expensive parts for a machine that
              may not
              > work.
              >
              > Adam<SNIP>
            • Paul
              Im sorry for being a bit niave but have been following this link about restoring wheels and the grief thats involved with mounting the said wheels in the lathe
              Message 6 of 18 , Apr 2, 2006
                Im sorry for being a bit niave but have been following this link
                about restoring wheels and the grief thats involved with mounting
                the said wheels in the lathe and so forth.....

                But why has no-one thought of using an electric drill with polishing
                wheels....Its so easy and not expensive either. It eliminates the
                need to mount the wheels on a large lathe or adapt/create some sort
                of device to use whilst still on the vehicle. Depending on the
                desired finish, there's loads of different compound/mop combinations
                to choose from...all across the range from mega shiney to dull
                brushed type finish. To me its seems everyones ONLY looking ast the
                problem from an engineers point of view IMHO



                --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "n5kzw" <n5kzw@...> wrote:
                >
                > Awhile back, there was a fellah around here that had himself a 4WD
                > 'Vette (Stingray). It was a pretty odd sight.
                >
                > Ed
                > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Adam Meister"
                > <adamandjen@> wrote:
                > >
                > > Well, I suppose while I'm at it I can make the car front wheel
                drive
                > also!
                > > An all wheel drive Trans Am might be cool. I've considered using
                > this idea
                > > as I've heard it works for re-doing Moon wheel discs, but I
                think I
                > enjoy
                > > having all of my fingers attatched to my hands! I think I'll
                still
                > try it
                > > before I start investing in any expensive parts for a machine
                that
                > may not
                > > work.
                > >
                > > Adam<SNIP>
                >
              • Joe R
                Here s how I did the mags on my son s 96 Cherokee. First I used BIX stripper to remove the remainder of the original clear coat. Then a wire brush on a drill
                Message 7 of 18 , Apr 2, 2006
                  Here's how I did the mags on my son's 96 Cherokee.
                  First I used BIX stripper to remove the remainder of the original clear
                  coat.
                  Then a wire brush on a drill to remove the corrosion.
                  Next I used steel wool and sandpaper to get a uniform surface.
                  Followed by PPG DX579 metal cleaner to get it ready for
                  PPG501 Aluminum conditioner. That leaves a nice hue and modifies the surface
                  to act as a primer.
                  Last but not least I applied automotive clear coat with a hardener.
                  They look fantastic!
                  To keep it on topic, the jeep will carry his Craftsman 12 to it's new home!

                  JoBo
                • Paul
                  ... done with mops and a drill. There s no need to rub down and if you use the correct compound/mop combination then its possible to mirror polish steel, so
                  Message 8 of 18 , Apr 2, 2006
                    --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Joe R" <jromas@...> wrote:
                    >Hi, I've posted a pic in the photos section to show what can be
                    done with mops and a drill. There's no need to rub down and if you
                    use the correct compound/mop combination then its possible to mirror
                    polish steel, so getting imperfections out of ali is no problem.
                    the wheel in the picture was full of turning marks from the original
                    manufacture but came out ok. Afterwards all it needs is some belgom
                    alu to keep it protected and shiney

                    Paul


                    > Here's how I did the mags on my son's 96 Cherokee.
                    > First I used BIX stripper to remove the remainder of the original
                    clear
                    > coat.
                    > Then a wire brush on a drill to remove the corrosion.
                    > Next I used steel wool and sandpaper to get a uniform surface.
                    > Followed by PPG DX579 metal cleaner to get it ready for
                    > PPG501 Aluminum conditioner. That leaves a nice hue and modifies
                    the surface
                    > to act as a primer.
                    > Last but not least I applied automotive clear coat with a hardener.
                    > They look fantastic!
                    > To keep it on topic, the jeep will carry his Craftsman 12 to it's
                    new home!
                    >
                    > JoBo
                    >
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