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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?

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  • hlees
    Mcmaster Carr sells the stuff. ... From: joegourlay To: Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 3:06 PM
    Message 1 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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      Mcmaster Carr sells the stuff.
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...>
      To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 3:06 PM
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?


      > Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as NOBODY sells
      > real felt!
      >
    • jerdal
      ... Except MSC, Small Parts Inc, etc, etc, etc JT -- No virus found in this outgoing message. Checked by AVG Free Edition. Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database:
      Message 2 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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        > Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as NOBODY sells
        > real felt!

        Except MSC, Small Parts Inc, etc, etc, etc

        JT



        --
        No virus found in this outgoing message.
        Checked by AVG Free Edition.
        Version: 7.1.371 / Virus Database: 267.14.10/218 - Release Date: 01/02/2006
      • gto69ra4@aol.com
        Any industrial supply catalog or shop worth its salt will have tons of the stuff, in any thickness and stiffness you want. If you want to be cheap, go to a
        Message 3 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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          Any industrial supply catalog or shop worth its salt will have tons of the
          stuff, in any thickness and stiffness you want. If you want to be cheap, go to a
          piano repair shop and ask for some free scrap cuttings in various sizes.

          GTO(John)

          In a message dated 1/2/2006 9:07:04 AM Eastern Standard Time,
          jgourlay@... writes:
          Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as NOBODY sells
          real felt!


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • gto69ra4@aol.com
          Huh? Normal felt is just wool mat. It s been machine made for years all over the country. The mad as a hatter line came from hat makers who used mercury
          Message 4 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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            Huh? Normal felt is just wool mat. It's been machine made for years all over
            the country.

            The "mad as a hatter" line came from hat makers who used mercury salts to
            stiffen the felt to hold a hat shape. A town in Japan not too long ago was
            decimated by a plant that flushed the stuff into the drinking water.

            GTO(John)


            In a message dated 1/2/2006 9:32:16 AM Eastern Standard Time,
            MertBaker@... writes:
            Real felt is made by soaking rabbit fur in mercury, which is very hard on
            the people who make felt. "Mad as a Hatter"is not a figurative expression.
            Real felt is now made in other countries, where the word is not yet known.
            It is available, I just bot a new felt tricorn hat.
            Mert


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • hlees
            That is so misinformed. Mercury was only used as a stiffener in the hat making industry before the side effects became known, and was never an ingredient.
            Message 5 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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              That is so misinformed. Mercury was only used as a stiffener in the hat
              making industry before the side effects became known, and was never an
              ingredient. Rabbit felt is used for special industries but is far softer
              than sheeps felt as it is not very durable. Sheeps wool felt is more usual
              and is used by piano manufacturers, polishers, seal manufacturers etc. The
              process is basically cleaning (scouring) and combed (carded). The resulting
              nets or mesh is laid in an area around three feet square with the layers
              crossing each other. It is then thumped with a huge weight on a pendulum and
              nothing more than clean, soft, hot water or steam to assist the process. It
              is then dried and trimmed for ready for sale. There were two felt makers in
              England but closed in the last ten years.
              I was making piano hammers and when the stuff became more difficult to
              obtain, gave up.
              ---- Original Message -----
            • mertbaker
              Thanks, hlees. Stiffener, eh? Mert MertBaker@verizon.net ... From: hlees To: Sent: Monday, January 02,
              Message 6 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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                Thanks, hlees. Stiffener, eh?
                Mert

                MertBaker@...
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: "hlees" <hlees@...>
                To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 1:00 PM
                Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?


                > That is so misinformed. Mercury was only used as a stiffener in the hat
                > making industry before the side effects became known, and was never an
                > ingredient. Rabbit felt is used for special industries but is far softer
                > than sheeps felt as it is not very durable. Sheeps wool felt is more usual
                > and is used by piano manufacturers, polishers, seal manufacturers etc.
                The
                > process is basically cleaning (scouring) and combed (carded). The
                resulting
                > nets or mesh is laid in an area around three feet square with the layers
                > crossing each other. It is then thumped with a huge weight on a pendulum
                and
                > nothing more than clean, soft, hot water or steam to assist the process.
                It
                > is then dried and trimmed for ready for sale. There were two felt makers
                in
                > England but closed in the last ten years.
                > I was making piano hammers and when the stuff became more difficult to
                > obtain, gave up.
                > ---- Original Message -----
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
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              • rob macdonald
                Hello all, About the bearing oiler waste.When I got my TH42,the cups were plugged solid with....mung?Short story is I removed the waste,and run without
                Message 7 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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                  Hello all,
                  About the bearing oiler waste.When I got my TH42,the cups were plugged solid with....mung?Short story is I removed the waste,and run without any,just have to be careful to keep things clean there. Aside from being a little more messy,is there any real harm done?I use a railroad journal oil and the bearing covers were sealed with silicone,so the bearing actually run in an oil bath.Comments? Regards,Rob


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • Buckshot
                  Joe, Sure they do. Go to a second hand or thrift store and find an old felt hat. That will be wool felt and you just cut strips to size and shape. Just make
                  Message 8 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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                    Joe,

                    Sure they do.

                    Go to a second hand or thrift store and find an old felt hat.

                    That will be wool felt and you just cut strips to size and shape.

                    Just make sure you cut up those little "pinhead" size hats rather than real
                    hats to fit real people!

                    Buckshot

                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...>
                    To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 9:06 AM
                    Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?


                    > Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as NOBODY sells
                    > real felt!
                    >
                    > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, gto69ra4@a... wrote:
                    > >
                    > > It seems that many Atlas lathes came stock with cotton scrap in the
                    > oil cups.
                    > > If you can picture a coarse cotten ball stuffed in that's about it.
                    > Other
                    > > ones had actual cylinders of light industrial felt in the top of the
                    > cup. I'd say
                    > > either way would be fine.
                    > >
                    > > If you do go the felt route, make sure it's wool felt and not
                    > synthetic (like
                    > > craft stores sell). And get some to replace your way wipers.
                    > >
                    > > GTO(John)
                    > >
                    > >
                    > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    > >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                    > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                    > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    >
                    > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
                    >
                    > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
                    http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
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                    >
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                  • gto69ra4@aol.com
                    That s not always a good idea. Lots of felt hats have stuff like powdered clay in them, not to mention the curing and staining chemicals. GTO(John) In a
                    Message 9 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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                      That's not always a good idea. Lots of felt hats have stuff like powdered
                      clay in them, not to mention the curing and staining chemicals.

                      GTO(John)


                      In a message dated 1/2/2006 3:49:46 PM Eastern Standard Time,
                      buckshot@... writes:
                      Joe,

                      Sure they do.

                      Go to a second hand or thrift store and find an old felt hat.

                      That will be wool felt and you just cut strips to size and shape.

                      Just make sure you cut up those little "pinhead" size hats rather than real
                      hats to fit real people!

                      Buckshot


                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • n5kzw
                      I s pretty hard on the rabbit, too. - Ed ... hard on ... expression. ... known.
                      Message 10 of 19 , Jan 2, 2006
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                        I's pretty hard on the rabbit, too. - Ed
                        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "mertbaker" <MertBaker@p...>
                        wrote:
                        >
                        > Real felt is made by soaking rabbit fur in mercury, which is very
                        hard on
                        > the people who make felt. "Mad as a Hatter"is not a figurative
                        expression.
                        > Real felt is now made in other countries, where the word is not yet
                        known.
                        > It is available, I just bot a new felt tricorn hat.
                        > Mert
                        >
                        > MertBaker@v...
                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: "joegourlay" <jgourlay@m...>
                        > To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                        > Sent: Monday, January 02, 2006 9:06 AM
                        > Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?
                        >
                        >
                        > > Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as NOBODY sells
                        > > real felt!
                        > >
                        > > --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, gto69ra4@a... wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > It seems that many Atlas lathes came stock with cotton scrap in the
                        > > oil cups.
                        > > > If you can picture a coarse cotten ball stuffed in that's about it.
                        > > Other
                        > > > ones had actual cylinders of light industrial felt in the top of the
                        > > cup. I'd say
                        > > > either way would be fine.
                        > > >
                        > > > If you do go the felt route, make sure it's wool felt and not
                        > > synthetic (like
                        > > > craft stores sell). And get some to replace your way wipers.
                        > > >
                        > > > GTO(John)
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        > > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                        > > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                        > > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        > >
                        > > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
                        > >
                        > > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
                        > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
                        > > Yahoo! Groups Links
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • JM
                        Hi, I m just a newby lurker still trying to put a TH54 together piece by piece, but is there a reason one couldn t simply whack a short hunk of thin cotton
                        Message 11 of 19 , Jan 4, 2006
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                          Hi, I'm just a newby lurker still trying to put a TH54
                          together piece by piece, but is there a reason one
                          couldn't simply whack a short hunk of thin cotton
                          clothesline, or yarn bought at the 99 cent store and
                          inserted with a box finnish nail? it's only a gravity
                          feed wick to temporarily hold and dribble oil while
                          running; a green scouring pad strip may also do that
                          seems to me, depending upon the viscosity; high-tack
                          chainsaw bar oil clings to gears N bearings well too,
                          aye. I'll be getting to this point within a month or
                          two, so I'd like to know as well.
                          Thanks

                          John McManamey
                          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
                          Message: 3
                          Date: Mon, 02 Jan 2006 14:06:31 -0000
                          From: "joegourlay" <jgourlay@...>
                          Subject: Re: Replacement Oil Cup wicks?

                          Looks like I'm going to end up using cotton scraps as
                          NOBODY sells
                          real felt!
                          ______________________________________________________________
                        • gto69ra4@aol.com
                          I m not sure what you have in mind. The headstock oil cups should be a good 1/2 in diameter. The cotton or felt is in the upper part. Nothing needs stuffing
                          Message 12 of 19 , Jan 4, 2006
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                            I'm not sure what you have in mind. The headstock oil cups should be a good
                            1/2" in diameter. The cotton or felt is in the upper part. Nothing needs
                            stuffing in with a nail.

                            Chainsaw bar oil is mainly made to stick to sliding surfaces. It makes a poor
                            bearing lube. Some folks use it for way oil. For your spindle and everything
                            else stick to specs. 10 to 20 weight non-detergent oil. Mobil Velocite is a
                            good high-end spindle oil.

                            GTO(John)


                            In a message dated 1/5/2006 12:09:53 AM Eastern Standard Time,
                            jmcman57@... writes:
                            Hi, I'm just a newby lurker still trying to put a TH54
                            together piece by piece, but is there a reason one
                            couldn't simply whack a short hunk of thin cotton
                            clothesline, or yarn bought at the 99 cent store and
                            inserted with a box finnish nail? it's only a gravity
                            feed wick to temporarily hold and dribble oil while
                            running; a green scouring pad strip may also do that
                            seems to me, depending upon the viscosity; high-tack
                            chainsaw bar oil clings to gears N bearings well too,
                            aye. I'll be getting to this point within a month or
                            two, so I'd like to know as well.
                            Thanks

                            John McManamey


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • Jon Elson
                            ... I m sure these would work, too. I used a piece of an athletic shoe lace. You don t want to use chain and bar oil in Timken bearings. I m not sure that
                            Message 13 of 19 , Jan 5, 2006
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                              JM wrote:

                              >Hi, I'm just a newby lurker still trying to put a TH54
                              >together piece by piece, but is there a reason one
                              >couldn't simply whack a short hunk of thin cotton
                              >clothesline, or yarn bought at the 99 cent store and
                              >inserted with a box finnish nail? it's only a gravity
                              >feed wick to temporarily hold and dribble oil while
                              >running; a green scouring pad strip may also do that
                              >seems to me, depending upon the viscosity; high-tack
                              >chainsaw bar oil clings to gears N bearings well too,
                              >aye. I'll be getting to this point within a month or
                              >two, so I'd like to know as well.
                              >
                              >
                              I'm sure these would work, too. I used a piece of an
                              athletic shoe lace.

                              You don't want to use chain and bar oil in Timken bearings.
                              I'm not sure that would be so good in the babbit bearing,
                              either.

                              Jon
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