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Re: I'm picking up my 12 x 36 Friday... Gantry - Equipment Moving

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  • Dennis Pasek
    Another possiblilty, although you don t have enough time to gather the parts now, is to set up a gantry with pallet rack parts. You might consider this for
    Message 1 of 8 , May 5, 2005
      Another possiblilty, although you don't have enough time to gather the
      parts now, is to set up a gantry with pallet rack parts. You might
      consider this for future use. One of the other members mentioned a
      tripod gantry, but I think pallet rack is easy and sturdier although
      somewhat less portable. I can set up my rig by myself in about 1/2
      hour and the rack components cost me less than $100 altogether. I can
      carry all of the parts in my pickup truck in one trip. Total weight
      is about 300 Lbs. No drilling, cutting or other machining was
      required. You can get used pallet rack from many companies that
      service material handling equipment such as fork lifts. Scrap metal
      dealers also sometimes have it.

      You will need at least two uprights, height depending on where you
      want to place the gantry and width as available. 42" width is very
      common, 36" is also readily available. There are many lengths made
      and the uprights can easily be shortened using an abrasive cutoff saw
      giving a nice clean, square cut. I chose 14 foot X 36 inch width for
      my own application. I have a third upright, 10 feet high with two
      shorter beams, to use as an assembly platform but for shorter
      uprights, a ladder is sufficient. Many upright designs are rated for
      24,000 Lbs each, total load as long as they are not damaged. You will
      also need at least 3 load beams of appropriate length: 8, 10, and 12
      foot lengths are common. Many of these beams can support 6000 Lbs or
      more (distributed) per pair. I used 12 foot lengths. In the final
      assembly, two beams go at the very top to support the load and the
      third mounts a few feet down to serve as a brace. Be sure that you
      have some mechanism to lock the beam ends in place to prevent an end
      from popping out during assembly. Many beams have a built in latch
      but bolts and nuts are sufficient. You will need another short beam
      (or two back-to-back) to mount crosswise on the top two main load
      beams. This cross beam will support a chainfall or hoist. This
      arrangement can easily support a 2 ton single point load if you size
      your components appropriately.

      The assembly procedure that I use is to first lay both uprights on the
      ground and clip a load beam into the bottom of each upright in such a
      way that one beam will be on each side of the assembly when the
      uprights are erected. Then I walk each upright into vertical
      position. The attached load beam serves as a counterweight and
      steadies the upright for subsequent assembly. Then I clip the free
      end of each upright into the bottom of the opposite upright to form a
      secure rectangle. Next, I place the third load beam at or near the
      top, clipping it into both uprights. Finally, one at a time, I remove
      each bottom beam and clip it into its final location at the top of the
      assembly giving the configuration described earlier. Lastly, I place
      the short beam crosswise at the mid point of the top beams, secure it
      so that it cannot slip, and attach my hoist with a chain. For safety,
      never try to support any load directly from either of the long load
      beams. To do so would risk instability of the structure. If you want
      more versatility, you can mount a long "I" beam midway between the
      load beams using multiple short cross beams and then attach your hoist
      with a trolley.

      When looking for racking, be aware that some styles are easier to
      assemble than others, especially when clipping a long beam in at the
      top. Interlake wedge style is the easiest that I have used. This is
      the type that Home Depot uses and is found widely throughout the
      Western U.S. Teardrop (often used at Lowe's) is a bit more difficult
      to attach. Safety latches are made in a wide variety. Some styles
      use a pin that is pushed into place after the beam end is secure.
      Spring type safety latches can make for difficult assembly and removal
      unless you temporarily put a wedge under the spring. Beam styles
      where the weight is supported on separate pins cannot be assembled solo.

      Once assembled, this rig is easy to use but be sure to enlist help for
      heavy loads and make sure that everybody knows the procedure in
      advance. Just back your truck or trailer under the hoist, rig your
      load with appropriate slings, and lift the weight free of the bed.
      Then drive forward so that you are clear. Then you can lower your
      load onto a dolley, pallet truck or rollers. Always remember, for
      safety, never place any part of your body underneath a suspended load.
      Watch your fingers and toes. Prepare your rigging in advance with
      more parts than you think you will need to avoid last minute cobbling.
      Take your time. Also, beware of the posibility of tipping when
      handling machinery. Check and double check the security of your
      rigging, use padding at corners where necessary, then check again as
      you take up the weight. A heavy load that slips can turn you into a
      grease spot before you even have time to blink.

      I have also used a rented tilt bed trailer (someone else mentioned
      this as a possibility) and an electric winch to drag the load both on
      and off. Snatch blocks with hooks are a big help. I was able to move
      heavy items including a fork lift and a small knee type mill with the
      help of only one other person using this equipment arrangement. Some
      material handling equipment companies have tilt bed trailers that they
      will rent. Tilt bed is much easier and safer than ramps.

      Some of the group members may already know all of this and not need
      any reminders. If that is the case, then this is not intended for
      you. I am not even close to being a pro at any of this, but I have
      had some useful experience with my own equipment and never any damage.
      I have included the info for the sake of completeness and for the
      benefit of those who have not handled heavy items before.

      With some mistakes, you don't get a second chance.

      Regards,
      Dennis



      --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "mud_spinner"
      <mud_spinner@y...> wrote:
      > I found a 12 x 36 craftsman atlas late model lathe and I am going to
      > pick it up Friday. What are the first things I should know?
      > ...
      >
      > Ben
    • sauer38h
      The first thing is to get all the parts! If the owner has taken off little items like the way wipers and put them in a box somewhere, you ll want them. That
      Message 2 of 8 , May 5, 2005
        The first thing is to get all the parts!

        If the owner has taken off little items like the way wipers and put
        them in a box somewhere, you'll want them. That little stuff will be
        unreasonably expensive to replace later. Gears, rests, tool holders,
        centers, faceplates, collets, chucks, tailstock chucks, etc are easily
        overlooked, especially if they've been carefully packed away
        somewhere. Paperwork is nice too - manuals, parts lists, etc.

        Small lathes like these I generally disassemble into major chunks, and
        just lift the chunks into the car.



        --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "mud_spinner"
        <mud_spinner@y...> wrote:
        > I found a 12 x 36 craftsman atlas late model lathe and I am going to
        > pick it up Friday. What are the first things I should know?
        >
        > FWIW I am mechanicaly inclined and have been reading up a LOT about
        > lathes. I have found a couple of tutorials on setting up and checking
        > alignment (I don't own a machinists level) but I thought that this
        > would be the best place to get access to a wealth of knowledge and
        > experience that I wouldn't have access to normally. (anybody in the
        > Bluegrass area? I'd love to learn and just contact some folks with
        > similar interests as I am somewhat new to the area)
        >
        >
        >
        > I'll be loading the machine into my truck bed. Should I remove parts
        > to make the job easier?
        >
        > I had planned to use some hot rolled 1" dia bars to roll it up to the
        > front of the bed. Any suggestions?
        >
        >
        > Getting it out of the truck will be the biggest challenge. I will
        > probably be rolling it out onto a table for cleaning before using it.
        > Any tips on cleaning and checking before use??
        >
        >
        > I am really excited and apprehensive. I hope the machine doesn't turn
        > out to be a junker that I have to part out to try to get my money
        > back. I really want alathe so I can learn how to machine things.
        >
        > Sorry to ramble, Thanks in advance,
        >
        > Ben
      • rburkheimer
        ... What a great idea! I ve been meaning to buy some pallet racks for workshop benches & overhead storage. I ll get an extra set for gantry use. Thanks for
        Message 3 of 8 , May 8, 2005
          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, "Dennis Pasek"
          <dennis.pasek@h...> wrote:
          > Another possiblilty, although you don't have enough time to gather the
          > parts now, is to set up a gantry with pallet rack parts.

          What a great idea! I've been meaning to buy some pallet racks for
          workshop benches & overhead storage. I'll get an extra set for gantry use.
          Thanks for the detailed and informative post.

          Rex B
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