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restoring a Pick-o-Matic

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  • mtechserv
    I m currently restoring an Atlas Pick-O-Matic lathe. Overall, the lathe is in very good condition. Wether it makes sense or not, I would like to restore the
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 3 10:36 AM
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      I'm currently restoring an Atlas Pick-O-Matic lathe. Overall, the
      lathe is in very good condition. Wether it makes sense or not, I
      would like to restore the lathe to "good as new" condition.

      The bed has a small amount of wear near the headstock and a few
      small nicks in other locations on the bed. I would like to have
      someone grind the bed, but I'm not sure who can do this. It is a 54"
      bed. A typical machine shop does not have the equipment to do this,
      so I'm looking for some companies that specialize in machinery
      repair / rebuilding. Does anyone have any suggestions?
      I'm located in central PA, so I would prefer a shop within 200
      miles. However, I would be willing to ship it if necessary.

      The only other major component on the lathe that needs attention is
      the leadscrew. I can probably purchase a precision acme leadscrew
      and turn the ends to fit the Atlas. Has anyone done this?

      Thanks in advance for your help.


      Brian
    • Jon Elson
      ... That is not likely to be productive. Most shops that specialize in rebuilding of old machines won t touch jobs much under $100,000! So, giant
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 3 3:25 PM
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        mtechserv wrote:

        >I'm currently restoring an Atlas Pick-O-Matic lathe. Overall, the
        >lathe is in very good condition. Wether it makes sense or not, I
        >would like to restore the lathe to "good as new" condition.
        >
        >The bed has a small amount of wear near the headstock and a few
        >small nicks in other locations on the bed. I would like to have
        >someone grind the bed, but I'm not sure who can do this. It is a 54"
        >bed. A typical machine shop does not have the equipment to do this,
        >so I'm looking for some companies that specialize in machinery
        >repair / rebuilding.
        >
        That is not likely to be productive. Most shops that "specialize" in
        rebuilding
        of old machines won't touch jobs much under $100,000! So, giant
        Kearney&Trecker
        mills and such are done, but nobody "in the business" can possibly do an
        Atlas
        and make money on it. The setup time would cost almost $1000 alone.

        What you need is somebody that DOES have the equipment, but doesn't
        generally do machine tool repair. They might take it on just for the
        experience.
        All you need is a 6' surface grinder. That is pretty big, but there are
        outfits
        that have reason to have such equipment for other purposes.

        I have heard of Atlas beds being done on large Blanchard grinders, too.

        > Does anyone have any suggestions?
        >I'm located in central PA, so I would prefer a shop within 200
        >miles. However, I would be willing to ship it if necessary.
        >
        >The only other major component on the lathe that needs attention is
        >the leadscrew. I can probably purchase a precision acme leadscrew
        >and turn the ends to fit the Atlas. Has anyone done this?
        >
        >
        Unless your lathe is a "D" model (no power crossfeed) the screw has a
        keyway running the length of the screw. You'd have to machine that in.

        Jon
      • mtechserv
        Thanks for the response Jon. I understand what you re saying about machinery rebuilders. I have done some work in the past with some shops that have blanchard
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 3 5:10 PM
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          Thanks for the response Jon. I understand what you're saying about
          machinery rebuilders. I have done some work in the past with some
          shops that have blanchard grinders. Maybe I'll contact them.

          You're right about the lead screw. Fortunately, I have a good
          relationship with a couple local shops with mills large enough they
          could easily cut a slot over the entire length of the screw.

          Brian

          --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Jon Elson <elson@p...> wrote:
          > mtechserv wrote:
          >
          > >I'm currently restoring an Atlas Pick-O-Matic lathe. Overall, the
          > >lathe is in very good condition. Wether it makes sense or not, I
          > >would like to restore the lathe to "good as new" condition.
          > >
          > >The bed has a small amount of wear near the headstock and a few
          > >small nicks in other locations on the bed. I would like to have
          > >someone grind the bed, but I'm not sure who can do this. It is a
          54"
          > >bed. A typical machine shop does not have the equipment to do
          this,
          > >so I'm looking for some companies that specialize in machinery
          > >repair / rebuilding.
          > >
          > That is not likely to be productive. Most shops that "specialize"
          in
          > rebuilding
          > of old machines won't touch jobs much under $100,000! So, giant
          > Kearney&Trecker
          > mills and such are done, but nobody "in the business" can possibly
          do an
          > Atlas
          > and make money on it. The setup time would cost almost $1000
          alone.
          >
          > What you need is somebody that DOES have the equipment, but doesn't
          > generally do machine tool repair. They might take it on just for
          the
          > experience.
          > All you need is a 6' surface grinder. That is pretty big, but
          there are
          > outfits
          > that have reason to have such equipment for other purposes.
          >
          > I have heard of Atlas beds being done on large Blanchard grinders,
          too.
          >
          > > Does anyone have any suggestions?
          > >I'm located in central PA, so I would prefer a shop within 200
          > >miles. However, I would be willing to ship it if necessary.
          > >
          > >The only other major component on the lathe that needs attention
          is
          > >the leadscrew. I can probably purchase a precision acme leadscrew
          > >and turn the ends to fit the Atlas. Has anyone done this?
          > >
          > >
          > Unless your lathe is a "D" model (no power crossfeed) the screw
          has a
          > keyway running the length of the screw. You'd have to machine
          that in.
          >
          > Jon
        • Jon Elson
          ... You also need to support it pretty well when milling. A gross trick I used once was to clamp the part into the table slot, as I had nothing resembling a 3
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 3 11:19 PM
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            mtechserv wrote:

            >Thanks for the response Jon. I understand what you're saying about
            >machinery rebuilders. I have done some work in the past with some
            >shops that have blanchard grinders. Maybe I'll contact them.
            >
            >You're right about the lead screw. Fortunately, I have a good
            >relationship with a couple local shops with mills large enough they
            >could easily cut a slot over the entire length of the screw.
            >
            >
            You also need to support it pretty well when milling. A gross trick I
            used once was to clamp the part into the table slot, as I had nothing
            resembling a 3 foot long Vee block. It wasn't terribly accurate, but it
            worked for that particular project.

            Jon
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