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RE: [atlas_craftsman] atlas/craftsman model 918B

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  • Patrick Lee Rooney
    Welcome to the UPS haters club. After working half my life, I purchased my dream tuner...a Marantz 10b. It was destroyed by UPS in transit, and they denied my
    Message 1 of 12 , Mar 31, 2004
      Welcome to the UPS haters club. After working half my life, I purchased my
      dream tuner...a Marantz 10b. It was destroyed by UPS in transit, and they
      denied my claim. Improper packing. What the F#$@ have I been paying
      insurance for all these years? They claim the packaging must withstand "a
      drop 6' onto a concrete floor, and additionally, a 50# impact from above". I
      will never use UPS again,, and I ship a lot of shit. Good luck dealing with
      those folks. FedEx from now on! Sorry about your loss. VERY frustrating I
      know.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: bolomk27 [mailto:tmjans@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2004 8:30 PM
      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] atlas/craftsman model 918B


      I just bought an atlas lathe off ebay.
      Like everyone else I kicked around the chinese 7x idea but decided to
      get the more capable equipment even though I spent nearly twice as
      much.
      Unfortunatly, a little bit of knowledge is dangerous and I had
      very little idea what I was getting. Well, after a lot of looking, I
      finally found the model at http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas/page19.html
      Turns out its a model 918b that was made between '34 and '38.
      Of course, when it was shipped (dissassembled in two crates) ups
      dropped both (upsidedown and sideways) breaking 3 parts.
      The big wavy pully, the triple spindle pully and the right side lead
      screw mount. UPS is fighting the claim saying bad packing even though
      it had arrows and 'up' on all sides.
      Now I have to decide if its worth fixing. Any suggestions would
      be helpful for repairs. Also, what kind of performance I can expect
      from it. Is it even worth fixing or is it just a rare museum piece?




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    • mertbaker
      The 618 is a nice little lathe, surely worth fixing. That said, From my experience with both, given the choice between a brand new 618 & a ditto 7x12 from
      Message 2 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
        The 618 is a nice little lathe, surely worth fixing. That said, From my
        experience with both, given the choice between a brand new 618 & a ditto
        7x12 from griz, I would take the 7x. It has a much larger hole thru the HS
        spindle, uses #3 & #2 tapers, has a variable speed spindle, & is quite a bit
        stiffer. I would take the 618 only if I had need for the 18" between
        centers, or the low speed available for threading. If one is used to one of
        the Unis, the 618 will seem huge & versatile. If used to one of the 7xs,
        the 618 will seem large, primitive & a little sloppy.
        Mert

        MertBaker@...
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "bolomk27" <tmjans@...>
        To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Wednesday, March 31, 2004 11:30 PM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] atlas/craftsman model 918B


        > I just bought an atlas lathe off ebay.
        > Like everyone else I kicked around the chinese 7x idea but decided to
        > get the more capable equipment even though I spent nearly twice as
        > much.
        > Unfortunatly, a little bit of knowledge is dangerous and I had
        > very little idea what I was getting. Well, after a lot of looking, I
        > finally found the model at http://www.lathes.co.uk/atlas/page19.html
        > Turns out its a model 918b that was made between '34 and '38.
        > Of course, when it was shipped (dissassembled in two crates) ups
        > dropped both (upsidedown and sideways) breaking 3 parts.
        > The big wavy pully, the triple spindle pully and the right side lead
        > screw mount. UPS is fighting the claim saying bad packing even though
        > it had arrows and 'up' on all sides.
        > Now I have to decide if its worth fixing. Any suggestions would
        > be helpful for repairs. Also, what kind of performance I can expect
        > from it. Is it even worth fixing or is it just a rare museum piece?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
        > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
        > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
        >
        > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
        >
        > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
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        >
        >
        >
        >
      • jerdal
        ... No. Frankly that sort of thing is not frustrating. In my case it is a call to direct and destructive action against the perps. I just haven t finished
        Message 3 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
          >VERY frustrating I
          > know.


          No. Frankly that sort of thing is not frustrating. In my case it is a
          call to direct and destructive action against the perps. I just haven't
          finished the plan....................

          UPS is, of course, totally unrealistic. 6' onto concrete? Hah. They
          really drop things 15' from the conveyor to the floor. They also jump on
          piles of packages in their chutes, to unclog the chutes. Hence the top
          impact.

          As far as packing, the magic numbers are the "drop" and the "stop"
          distances. Here the "drop" is 6'. The "stop" is how far your packing pads
          let the innards move as they are decelerated. The "G" forces are =
          drop/stop +1.

          A Hint.......the G forces shouldn't be very large, maybe 10. and teh
          packing pads should be stout enough to stop the innards from hitting the
          floor within the stop distance.

          Jerrold
        • mertbaker
          No one should ship anything more fragile than rubber tubing via UPS. Mert MertBaker@prodigy.net ... From: jerdal To:
          Message 4 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
            No one should ship anything more fragile than rubber tubing via UPS.
            Mert

            MertBaker@...
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: "jerdal" <jerdal@...>
            To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thursday, April 01, 2004 8:13 AM
            Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] atlas/craftsman model 918B


            >
            > >VERY frustrating I
            > > know.
            >
            >
            > No. Frankly that sort of thing is not frustrating. In my case it is a
            > call to direct and destructive action against the perps. I just haven't
            > finished the plan....................
            >
            > UPS is, of course, totally unrealistic. 6' onto concrete? Hah. They
            > really drop things 15' from the conveyor to the floor. They also jump
            on
            > piles of packages in their chutes, to unclog the chutes. Hence the top
            > impact.
            >
            > As far as packing, the magic numbers are the "drop" and the "stop"
            > distances. Here the "drop" is 6'. The "stop" is how far your packing
            pads
            > let the innards move as they are decelerated. The "G" forces are =
            > drop/stop +1.
            >
            > A Hint.......the G forces shouldn't be very large, maybe 10. and teh
            > packing pads should be stout enough to stop the innards from hitting the
            > floor within the stop distance.
            >
            > Jerrold
            >
            >
            >
            > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
            > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
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            >
            > Atlas-Craftsman Projects list is at
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman_projects/
            >
            > To see or edit your personal settings, view the photos, files or links
            http://groups.yahoo.com/group/atlas_craftsman/
            > Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
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            >
          • Bob May
            Sorry but I ve seen UPS destroy rubber tubing! I ve had to work a lot with UPS over the years and they have just gotten successively worse. I will agree that
            Message 5 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
              Sorry but I've seen UPS destroy rubber tubing!
              I've had to work a lot with UPS over the years and they have just gotten
              successively worse.
              I will agree that sometimes bad packing is the problem (just got a package
              from FedEx ground which took 17 days cross country and arrived with the part
              practically hanging out of the box) but when decently packed parts are
              broken in shipment by the packing being literally destroyed, there is
              nothing that can be done for the internal stuff.
              I'll ship a heavy piece of optical glass by any other shipper and expect it
              to make it to the destination without problems. The glass is shipped in
              wood (2" thick sides and 3/4" plywood tops and bottoms) boxes with padding
              to keep the glass from bounding about inside and wouldn't do that with UPS
              as the package is too heavy for them to bother to set it down rather than
              just throw it. I'd probably consider that the max weight for a package to
              make it successfully through the UPS people would be a 2lb. package but that
              can be shipped for less with the postal service and get there in 3 days
              anyway.
              Bob May
              http://nav.to/bobmay
              bobmay@...
              NEW! http://bobmay.astronomy.net
            • jerdal
              The folks who ship a lot of glass discovered a while back that padding breaks glass.....if it is evenly supported. The smart folks apparently figured out that
              Message 6 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
                The folks who ship a lot of glass discovered a while back that padding
                breaks glass.....if it is evenly supported.

                The smart folks apparently figured out that you should support glass tubing
                at the points where the bending is minimized and the G-force is balanced
                between the sections of a contiguous tube. These are something like 2/9 or
                3/11 or some such fraction in from each end.

                There would be points to support a sheet of glass etc at for similar
                performance.

                Jerrold

                > Sorry but I've seen UPS destroy rubber tubing!
                > I've had to work a lot with UPS over the years and they have just gotten
                > successively worse.
                > I'll ship a heavy piece of optical glass by any other shipper and expect
                it
                > to make it to the destination without problems. The glass is shipped in
                > wood (2" thick sides and 3/4" plywood tops and bottoms) boxes with padding
                > to keep the glass from bounding about inside and wouldn't do that with UPS
                > as the package is too heavy for them to bother to set it down rather than
                > just throw it.
              • LouD31M066@aol.com
                Michigan State University has a School of Packaging to train Packaging Engineers who do what else but design and test packaging designs to get the product from
                Message 7 of 12 , Apr 1, 2004
                  Michigan State University has a School of Packaging to train Packaging
                  Engineers who do
                  what else but design and test packaging designs to get the product from
                  manufacturer to
                  consumer. Designing a package to withstand UPS might give them a real world
                  challange.
                  Louis


                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • jerdal
                  ... world ... Been there , done that. Even had the UPS folks design one to compare to. Theirs cost 20% of the product cost.............
                  Message 8 of 12 , Apr 2, 2004
                    > consumer. Designing a package to withstand UPS might give them a real
                    world
                    > challange.

                    Been there , done that. Even had the UPS folks design one to compare to.
                    Theirs cost 20% of the product cost.............
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