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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Hmmmm

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  • mertbaker
    Older lathes were designed to use Carbon steel tooling, which will not stand up to very high speeds. Newer ones, designed in the 30s when HSS was the tool
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 2, 2004
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      Older lathes were designed to use Carbon steel tooling, which will not stand
      up to very high speeds. Newer ones, designed in the 30s when HSS was the
      tool material turn faster, and the late ones for carbide, faster still. Us
      old fogies in the hobby, like the slow speeds for threading, and with a new
      lathe like the 7x machines have to use a hand crank for precise control when
      threading, as even the slow speeds are too fast. The HS setting on the 7xs
      is for stuff under 1/2" dia..
      Mert

      MertBaker@...
      ----- Original Message -----
      From: "jo barden" <jobarden422@...>
      To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Monday, February 02, 2004 5:04 PM
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Hmmmm


      >
      > My twopenth,
      >
      > I have found that my Sphere (atlas 10") with its sixteen speeds is better
      > than modern machines as it can run slower in backgear than modern machines
      > allowing larger work to be undertaken than would otherwise be possible
      with
      > this size of machine, it has the versitility of screwcutting and the
      weight
      > to give confidence in the work you need to do, I also think that it is
      > better than the Myford which I consider over priced even if it doe's have
      > lots of gizmos.
      > Stick with your Atlas you will be able to get spares for a long time to
      > come, long after the far eastern machine has become rust on the workshop
      > floor and isn't it better and more environmentally friendly to keep a bit
      of
      > industrial history doing the job it was designed for.
      >
      > thats my opinion
      >
      > Jo
      >
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    • n8as1@aol.com
      In a message dated 2/2/2004 11:21:55 AM Central Standard Time, ... AMEN, brother Randy ..........only conclusion i can come to is the nay sayers must have
      Message 2 of 12 , Feb 2, 2004
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        In a message dated 2/2/2004 11:21:55 AM Central Standard Time,
        rpedersen1@... writes:

        > I would not trade my 618 for a truck load of 7x10s. It has slower speeds
        > for
        > threading and has always done anything ask of it that was in it
        > capabilities. If you spend a little time looking and find one that has not
        > been abused I think you would be very happy.
        >
        > Randy Pedersen
        > Salina, Ks
        > Atlas 618
        > South Bend 1946 9" A, 1938 9" C
        > Enco 1105 Mill Drill
        > rpedersen1@...
        >
        >

        AMEN, brother Randy ..........only conclusion i can come to is the nay
        sayers must have experienced a beat up wore out 6x18 ,a redesigned late 6x18 ,or
        only had xperience w/ a monarch 10EE...confusing .....maybe they confuse the
        6x18 w/ a 6x12..........dunno........recently did some thrdng at over 600 rpm ,
        just to prove/disprove a point , but wud hate to have learned w/out that 54 rpm
        bottom backspeed

        best wishes'
        docn8as


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • jerdal
        ... not ... Its worth noting that the 618 is NOT a 109........ The 109 has the problems of the 7x, plus many more other problems, without the
        Message 3 of 12 , Feb 2, 2004
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          > > I would not trade my 618 for a truck load of 7x10s. It has slower speeds
          > > for
          > > threading and has always done anything ask of it that was in it
          > > capabilities. If you spend a little time looking and find one that has
          not
          > > been abused I think you would be very happy.

          Its worth noting that the 618 is NOT a 109........

          The 109 has the problems of the 7x, plus many more other problems, without
          the advantages........

          The 618 is a real lathe, made to do work by folks that knew how. Even if it
          was made to a price.

          But, price-wise, you can get a 7x for less than the price of a 618 in many
          places. 618s go cheap here, but that isn't true everywhere.

          Jerrold
        • bichonben2003
          If you are adventurous, you might want to pick up the Gingery books and build your own. I have a 618 but am seriously thinking of building some of Gingery s
          Message 4 of 12 , Feb 3, 2004
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            If you are adventurous, you might want to pick up the Gingery books
            and build your own. I have a 618 but am seriously thinking of
            building some of Gingery's contraptions including the lathe just for
            the learning experience. There is a Gingery group here on Yahoo if
            you want to check them out.
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