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Re: [atlas_craftsman] Alignment, Rollie's Dad, and my sanity (pt 2)

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  • Bob May
    Don t do that on a piece of aluminum unless you are sure that the rod is straight and the same diameter over the entire length. Better to use some
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
      Don't do that on a piece of aluminum unless you are sure that the rod is
      straight and the same diameter over the entire length. Better to use some
      centerground steel stock that you know is straight and even in diameter.
      Also, disconnect the motor and turn the lathe by hand or you may quickly
      produce a head beater that will ruin your day.
      Bob May
      http://nav.to/bobmay
      bobmay@...
      NEW! http://bobmay.astronomy.net
    • Ronald Thibault
      ... You re chasing your tail in this case. 1.5 away on an 1 bar will cause all sorts of deflection. Anything over a few inches, you should hold the other
      Message 2 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
        At 10:51 AM 1/2/03 -0500, you wrote:
        >After setting horizontal with Rollie's plan to < 0.0005 and having
        >vertical off by 0.010", I took a test cut.
        >
        >1" Aluminum bar, 2' long, all hanging over the bed. A cut at 1" from
        >the jaws and 18" from the jaws (end rotating free) showed me a
        >HUGE 0.025" difference in diameter.
        >
        >And my rookie question this week:
        > As bad as that .025" looks, am I really chasing my tail by trying to
        > dial this in with a long length of relatively soft material, held
        > in a 3-jaw chuck (with a decent amount of weight, hanging all out
        > over the bed).
        >
        >Thanks,
        >-d
        You're chasing your tail in this case. 1.5' away on an 1" bar will cause
        all sorts of deflection. Anything over a few inches, you should hold the
        other end in the tailstock center, for an accurate cut.

        Ron Thibault
        Warrenville, SC USA
        http://personal.atl.bellsouth.net/t/h/thib9564/
      • Ronald R Brandenburg
        Someone brought up earlier that you could use a shaft from an old printer or copier. Junk printers and copiers are a great source for round stock. It
        Message 3 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
          Someone brought up earlier that you could use a shaft from an old printer or
          copier. Junk printers and copiers are a great source for round stock. It
          machines well and the price is right. In addition to the stock there are
          electronics parts, [sensors, switches, etc.] we can use in our robot
          projects. 'AND', there're fun to take apart.

          Ron...
          ~ ~ ~ Always remember:
          The early bird may get the worm,
          but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.


          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "Bob May" <bobmay@...>
          To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 1:06 PM
          Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Alignment, Rollie's Dad, and my sanity (pt 2)


          | Don't do that on a piece of aluminum unless you are sure that the rod is
          | straight and the same diameter over the entire length. Better to use some
          | centerground steel stock that you know is straight and even in diameter.
          | Also, disconnect the motor and turn the lathe by hand or you may quickly
          | produce a head beater that will ruin your day.
          | Bob May
          | http://nav.to/bobmay
          | bobmay@...
          | NEW! http://bobmay.astronomy.net
          |
          |
          |
          | TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
          | You do this yourself by sending a message to:
          | atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          |
          |
          |
          | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
          |
          |
          |
        • LouD31M066@aol.com
          Copiers can be messy bears to take apart. The image powder is apt to smudge up everything within reach or downwind. Does have lots of gizmos suitable for
          Message 4 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
            Copiers can be messy bears to take apart. The image powder is apt to smudge
            up everything within reach or downwind. Does have lots of gizmos suitable for
            adaptive reuse!
            Louis
          • Damon Gentile
            So if properly disassembled, I wont have to buy prussian blue machinist s die for many years to come ? -Damon (with a broken printer right here...)
            Message 5 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
              So if properly disassembled, I wont have to buy prussian blue
              machinist's die for many years to come ?

              -Damon (with a broken printer right here...)

              LouD31M066@... wrote:
              >
              > Copiers can be messy bears to take apart. The image powder is apt to smudge
              > up everything within reach or downwind. Does have lots of gizmos suitable for
              > adaptive reuse!
              > Louis
              >
              > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
              > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
              > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
              >
              >
              >
              > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
            • LouD31M066@aol.com
              I don t know about that but I guarantee you that the person who does your laundry will comment about carry over in washer and dryer if you get it on your
              Message 6 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                I don't know about that but I guarantee you that the person who does your
                laundry will comment about carry over in washer and dryer if you get it on
                your clothes...
                hard enough to clean up even from garage floor.
                Louis
              • Ronald R Brandenburg
                I think I like old tractor feed printers best. Some of them have some really neat belts and pulleys with small bearings. Some of the really big copiers have
                Message 7 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                  I think I like old tractor feed printers best. Some of them have some
                  really neat belts and pulleys with small bearings. Some of the really big
                  copiers have squirrel cage fans.

                  Ron...
                  ~ ~ ~ Always remember:
                  The early bird may get the worm,
                  but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.


                  ----- Original Message -----
                  From: "Damon Gentile" <dgentile@...>
                  To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 5:04 PM
                  Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Alignment, Rollie's Dad, and my sanity (pt 2)


                  | So if properly disassembled, I wont have to buy prussian blue
                  | machinist's die for many years to come ?
                  |
                  | -Damon (with a broken printer right here...)
                  |
                  | LouD31M066@... wrote:
                  | >
                  | > Copiers can be messy bears to take apart. The image powder is apt to
                  smudge
                  | > up everything within reach or downwind. Does have lots of gizmos
                  suitable for
                  | > adaptive reuse!
                  | > Louis
                  | >
                  | > TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                  | > You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                  | > atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  | >
                  | >
                  | >
                  | > Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to
                  http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  |
                  |
                  | TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                  | You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                  | atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                  |
                  |
                  |
                  | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                  |
                  |
                  |
                • Ronald R Brandenburg
                  I m almost afraid to ask about just what you managed to get on and/or in your clothes. If it has something to do with Y-fronts? I don t want to know! Ron...
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                    I'm almost afraid to ask about just what you managed to get on and/or in
                    your clothes. If it has something to do with Y-fronts? I don't want to
                    know!

                    Ron...
                    ~ ~ ~ Always remember:
                    The early bird may get the worm,
                    but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.


                    ----- Original Message -----
                    From: <LouD31M066@...>
                    To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 5:20 PM
                    Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Alignment, Rollie's Dad, and my sanity (pt 2)


                    | I don't know about that but I guarantee you that the person who does your
                    | laundry will comment about carry over in washer and dryer if you get it on
                    | your clothes...
                    | hard enough to clean up even from garage floor.
                    | Louis
                    |
                    | TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                    | You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                    | atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                    |
                    |
                    |
                    | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                    |
                    |
                    |
                  • Bill Collins <bill_collins14@yahoo.com>
                    Hi Ron.You re right,these old printers and copiers have a lot of useful parts.I use the steel bars for making trunion pins for my cannons.Have even used some
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                      Hi Ron.You're right,these old printers and copiers have a lot of
                      useful parts.I use the steel bars for making trunion pins for my
                      cannons.Have even used some of the larger bars to make a boring bar
                      tool holder and a chuck key for my 3 jaw lathe chuck.Old sewing
                      machines also have a lot of useful parts.Amazing what one can use
                      from old stuff.
                      Bill C.
                    • Ronald R Brandenburg
                      Hey Bill, Have you ever made a boring bar with a tooth from a carbide saw blade? You need to use the same silver solder that is used for securing the carbide
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                        Hey Bill,

                        Have you ever made a boring bar with a tooth from a carbide
                        saw blade? You need to use the same silver solder that is used for securing
                        the carbide to the saw blank. I think it's called SilFlo. I believe it's a
                        higher temperature than average silver solder. I've done it several times
                        with good results.

                        Ron...
                        ~ ~ ~ Always remember:
                        The early bird may get the worm,
                        but it's the second mouse that gets the cheese.


                        ----- Original Message -----
                        From: <bill_collins14@...>
                        To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
                        Sent: Thursday, January 02, 2003 5:37 PM
                        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Alignment, Rollie's Dad, and my sanity (pt 2)


                        | Hi Ron.You're right,these old printers and copiers have a lot of
                        | useful parts.I use the steel bars for making trunion pins for my
                        | cannons.Have even used some of the larger bars to make a boring bar
                        | tool holder and a chuck key for my 3 jaw lathe chuck.Old sewing
                        | machines also have a lot of useful parts.Amazing what one can use
                        | from old stuff.
                        | Bill C.
                        |
                        |
                        | TO UNSUBSCRIBE FROM THE LIST:
                        | You do this yourself by sending a message to:
                        | atlas_craftsman-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
                        |
                        |
                        |
                        | Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/
                        |
                        |
                        |
                      • Bill Collins <bill_collins14@yahoo.com>
                        Hi Ron.No I haven t but that sounds like a great idea.I needed a parting tool for my 109 and I used a small file to make the parting tool.Also used files for
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                          Hi Ron.No I haven't but that sounds like a great idea.I needed a
                          parting tool for my 109 and I used a small file to make the parting
                          tool.Also used files for various other bits.I have a few old carbide
                          saw blades hanging in the shop.I may give it a try.Thanks a lot for
                          the tip.Much appreciated.
                          Bill C.
                        • LouD31M066@aol.com
                          The super fine, fluffy and very mobile black soot used in photo copier is hard to avoid when picking the bones for little gems for future reuse. Don t
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                            The super fine, fluffy and very mobile black "soot" used in photo copier is
                            hard to
                            avoid when picking the "bones" for little gems for future reuse. Don't know
                            about
                            related health questions...do know it ain't real healthy to dump your
                            clothing in
                            laundry if you have this stuff on clothes.
                            Louis
                          • jerdal
                            ... There is some merit to what Jon says! That part might have started climbing the tool and really got iteself and you into trouble. The approved method is to
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                              > >After setting horizontal with Rollie's plan to < 0.0005 and having
                              > >vertical off by 0.010", I took a test cut.
                              > >
                              > >1" Aluminum bar, 2' long, all hanging over the bed. A cut at 1" from
                              > >the jaws and 18" from the jaws (end rotating free) showed me a
                              > >HUGE 0.025" difference in diameter.
                              > This will never work. You are lucky you didn't bend the spindle or have
                              > the bar start
                              > whapping the lathe to pieces!

                              There is some merit to what Jon says! That part might have started climbing
                              the tool and really got iteself and you into trouble.

                              The approved method is to take a very light cut, so that the pressure of the
                              cutter does not spring the part. You have to have the piece concentric to
                              begin with, such as done between centers, turning gripping surface, and two
                              rings one close and one at far end. Middle is cut away.

                              I think I would use larger tubing, not a 1" bar, something in the 2" area,
                              and not go out farther than 15 or so inches. All you need to know should be
                              in that range.

                              Jerrold
                            • Jon Elson
                              ... No, toner is nothing like Prussian Blue, unfortunately. That is really nice stuff, but it takes WEEKS to come off your hands. I ve switched to Canode
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jan 2, 2003
                                Damon Gentile wrote:

                                >So if properly disassembled, I wont have to buy prussian blue
                                >machinist's die for many years to come ?
                                >
                                >
                                No, toner is nothing like Prussian Blue, unfortunately. That is really
                                nice stuff, but
                                it takes WEEKS to come off your hands. I've switched to Canode water
                                soluble dyes.
                                They are not as good as Prussian Blue, but good enough, and it really
                                does wash off
                                hands, and clothes, too!

                                Toner has particles that get all over everything, entirely wrong for
                                just about any
                                other purpose, unfortunately! But, the 4 or 5 copiers I've pulled apart
                                have all been
                                pretty clean inside.

                                Jon
                              • timharvey99 <gjgerhard@hotmail.com>
                                As others have pointed out, you were lucky to get away with turning that bar with it hanging out unsupported. Consider this: just hanging there, the far end of
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jan 8, 2003
                                  As others have pointed out, you were lucky to get away with turning
                                  that bar with it hanging out unsupported. Consider this: just hanging
                                  there, the far end of that bar is sagging over 6 thou just from it's
                                  own weight! For every pound of force applied to the far end, that bar
                                  will deflect .0091".

                                  Years ago I worked with a gorrila machinist who had a 2" steel shaft
                                  with undercuts in it hanging about 4 feet out the back of the
                                  headstock. Following his normal practice, he wound that lathe up to
                                  about its max. It wasn't long before that 4-foot section tore a hole
                                  in the shop roof. Anybody standing by could have been killed
                                  instantly.

                                  I like to point out to anyone who will listen that every "solid" is
                                  really a spring: diamond, glass, concrete, whatever; everything
                                  bends. "Rigid" is usually a relative term.

                                  --- In atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com, Damon Gentile <dgentile@s...>
                                  wrote:
                                  > After setting horizontal with Rollie's plan to < 0.0005 and having
                                  > vertical off by 0.010", I took a test cut.
                                  >
                                  > 1" Aluminum bar, 2' long, all hanging over the bed. A cut at 1"
                                  from
                                  > the jaws and 18" from the jaws (end rotating free) showed me a
                                  > HUGE 0.025" difference in diameter.
                                  >
                                  > And my rookie question this week:
                                  > As bad as that .025" looks, am I really chasing my tail by trying
                                  to
                                  > dial this in with a long length of relatively soft material, held
                                  > in a 3-jaw chuck (with a decent amount of weight, hanging all out
                                  > over the bed).
                                  >
                                  > Thanks,
                                  > -d
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