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RE: [atlas_craftsman] Quick Question/Gear repair

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  • Patrick Lee Rooney
    Hey Earl...your suggestion about tapping the root of the gear for a machine screw before brazing was really the ticket. And you were right about it being
    Message 1 of 13 , Oct 2, 2002
      Hey Earl...your suggestion about tapping the root of the gear for a machine
      screw before brazing was really the ticket. And you were right about it
      being difficult to braze too. The repair took about 3 hours, but it once
      again functions perfectly. Thanks again!

      Regards,
      Pat.

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Ebower [mailto:ebower@...]
      Sent: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 8:15 AM
      To: atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [atlas_craftsman] Quick Question


      Check the Machinery's handbook.

      It have various odd ball threads. It will give you the sizes it should be.

      It sound like you have a 1 3/32 dia special thread.

      Earl
      ebower@...


      ----- Original Message -----
      From: <HUNLEY31@...>
      To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
      Sent: Wednesday, October 02, 2002 9:20 AM
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Quick Question


      > Many thanks to those who replied for my call for help. I was trying
      to
      > avoid a long post as I type so slowly. Truth be told, I may be a little
      over
      > my head on this first attempt at matching threads. The male threads I'm
      > trying to match look like regular V threads with small flats across the
      top.
      > The od is 1.098. I assumed these were supposed to be 1.25 cause that's
      what
      > my reference stated were a standard for the TPI measured. Anyway the minor
      > dia. seems to be the problem. The 1.25 measurements don't seem to work. I
      > don't have the figures handy as I took my books to work to review (again)
      the
      > process.
      > If my next attempt fails I'll cut off the old threads and rethread to
      > something I feel more confidant with. In my heart I know I shouldn't have
      to
      > do this. I have the tools to do the job and all the problems are with me.
      I
      > hate being the weakest link.
      > It is possible that the Atlas inside threading tool is 'dragging' on the
      > cutting side a little. I don't want to regrind the tool and mess it up for
      > finer threads cause it's the only one I have. I'll try again in a couple
      of
      > days when I have time. What a slow processes this is. Thanks again.
      Hank
      >
      >
      >
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    • JMartin957@aol.com
      In a message dated 10/2/02 9:22:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, HUNLEY31@aol.com writes:
      Message 2 of 13 , Oct 2, 2002
        In a message dated 10/2/02 9:22:00 AM Eastern Daylight Time, HUNLEY31@...
        writes:

        << Many thanks to those who replied for my call for help. I was trying
        to
        avoid a long post as I type so slowly. Truth be told, I may be a little over
        my head on this first attempt at matching threads. The male threads I'm
        trying to match look like regular V threads with small flats across the top.
        The od is 1.098. I assumed these were supposed to be 1.25 cause that's what
        my reference stated were a standard for the TPI measured. Anyway the minor
        dia. seems to be the problem. The 1.25 measurements don't seem to work. I
        don't have the figures handy as I took my books to work to review (again)
        the
        process.
        If my next attempt fails I'll cut off the old threads and rethread to
        something I feel more confidant with. In my heart I know I shouldn't have to
        do this. I have the tools to do the job and all the problems are with me. I
        hate being the weakest link.
        It is possible that the Atlas inside threading tool is 'dragging' on the
        cutting side a little. I don't want to regrind the tool and mess it up for
        finer threads cause it's the only one I have. I'll try again in a couple of
        days when I have time. What a slow processes this is. Thanks again. Hank

        >>


        Hank:

        Regular V threads do have a flat. I don't have a handbook handy, but 1.25
        down to 1.098 seems far too great a reduction for the flat. Sounds more like
        a 1.125 thread. Only way to tell is with wires and a micrometer.

        As you're single-pointing the thread in a lathe, however, you shouldn't
        really be too worried about what size it really is. Cut to fit.

        The only reason to re-thread to a standard diameter is to allow you to use a
        tap on the internal threads rather than single-pointing them.

        Internal threading is tough. You can't see what is going on, there is more
        spring in the tool, the feed movements are reversed, and you have to worry
        more about stopping at the end of the cut. All that said, though, if you
        take small cuts - sometimes only a couple of thousandths - and periodically
        take a few cuts at the same setting to take the spring out of the process,
        you should easily be able to cut a thread to match an existing male thread.

        The Atlas internal threading tool is, as I recall, fairly light. You might
        want to make up a boring bar out of some heavier bar. For threading, I use
        round tool bits as you can rotate them to get the clearance angles. Broken
        center drills make great bits. We all have a few of those around, don't we?

        John Martin
      • LouD31M066@aol.com
        One of my attempts at an internal thread was so far off I had to use J B weld to build up thread enough so it could be used. Learned a thing or two about
        Message 3 of 13 , Oct 2, 2002
          One of my attempts at an internal thread was so far off I had to use J B weld
          to build up thread enough so it could be used. Learned a thing or two about
          internal threading, light flexible boring bars, speed selection and probably
          left
          enough material for more lessons in future. Threading is not something easily
          mastered, but, each success no matter how limited improves your starting point
          for the next lesson. One thread project saved me the investment in my lathe
          because I was able to make a "an absolutely unobtainable piece of plumbing
          hardware" and avoid throwing out an expensive to replace,but, perfectly usable
          item. The Atlas manual makes a point about threading being a source of profit
          to lathe owners. I found it to be true in my own very limited experience.
          Louis


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • jerdal
          One thread project saved me the investment in my lathe ... usable ... profit ... Had nearly the same experience (unobtainable plumbing adapter) , and it was
          Message 4 of 13 , Oct 2, 2002
            One thread project saved me the investment in my lathe
            > because I was able to make a "an absolutely unobtainable piece of plumbing
            > hardware" and avoid throwing out an expensive to replace,but, perfectly
            usable
            > item. The Atlas manual makes a point about threading being a source of
            profit
            > to lathe owners. I found it to be true in my own very limited experience.


            Had nearly the same experience (unobtainable plumbing adapter) , and it was
            about the second item I had ever threaded on the machine. First was a
            backplate. Both are still working though!

            Nothing like having to do it right......like when your big brother threw you
            in the pool and you learned to swim.

            Jerry
          • LouD31M066@aol.com
            Sink or swim is bad example for me...well meaning!? people tried that on me several times and I about drowned each time. Choke, vomit and water just don t get
            Message 5 of 13 , Oct 4, 2002
              Sink or swim is bad example for me...well meaning!? people tried that on me
              several times and I about drowned each time. Choke, vomit and water just don't
              get it with me. Went on to sail a season on Great Lakes Freighter where
              shipmates
              could not understand why a nonswimmer would sail...till I explained I did not
              think ships ran into trouble when water was warm and swimming in cold water
              would just prolong agony. Did not hear any argument on that.
              Louis


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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