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new member, lathe ID?

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  • Pete Fels
    Howdy; I m new here and pig ignorant about machining...I can weld and forge hot iron and do raising and chasing and all that, but what I know about lathes I
    Message 1 of 10 , Sep 21, 2002
      Howdy;
      I'm new here and pig ignorant about machining...I can weld and forge
      hot iron and do raising and chasing and all that, but what I know
      about lathes I learned by making mistakes..lots of them.
      I have an old 12"? Craftsman lathe with the serial # L6-1657s stamped
      on the end of the ways.
      Anyone know anything about it? Who made it? How old it is? Where to
      get parts for it?
      I called Clausing and ordered a replacement gear for the apron hand
      wheel but they didn't have the casting that holds the apron gears or
      the lead screw tail support which are broken.
      So, I did a really ugly job of welding them back together ( grim).
      Will see if they are way out of whack and if they hold when the gear
      comes.
      Any help would be appreciated....Ironyworks
    • Clint D
      Clausing is the only place that comes to my mind, but, I see a lot of 12 Craftsman stuff on Ebay Clint ... From: Pete Fels To:
      Message 2 of 10 , Sep 21, 2002
        Clausing is the only place that comes to my mind, but, I see a lot of 12"
        Craftsman stuff on Ebay
        Clint

        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Pete Fels" <ironyworks@...>
        To: <atlas_craftsman@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Saturday, September 21, 2002 2:11 AM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] new member, lathe ID?


        > Howdy;
        > I'm new here and pig ignorant about machining...I can weld and forge
        > hot iron and do raising and chasing and all that, but what I know
        > about lathes I learned by making mistakes..lots of them.
        > I have an old 12"? Craftsman lathe with the serial # L6-1657s stamped
        > on the end of the ways.
        > Anyone know anything about it? Who made it? How old it is? Where to
        > get parts for it?
        > I called Clausing and ordered a replacement gear for the apron hand
        > wheel but they didn't have the casting that holds the apron gears or
        > the lead screw tail support which are broken.
        > So, I did a really ugly job of welding them back together ( grim).
        > Will see if they are way out of whack and if they hold when the gear
        > comes.
        > Any help would be appreciated....Ironyworks
        >
        >
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        >
        >
        >
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        >
        >
      • LouD31M066@aol.com
        Some elements of lathe are permanent (ways,headstock) and some are prone to damage or loss such as screw bearing or gears. Best suggestion is get someone with
        Message 3 of 10 , Sep 21, 2002
          Some elements of lathe are permanent (ways,headstock) and some are prone to
          damage or loss such as screw bearing or gears. Best suggestion is get someone
          with similar lathe to precisely measure bearing and then cast one or more then
          file, drill and see how close you can come to a duplication. Other methods
          abound.
          I doubt not that a workable replacement is within the talent range of anyone
          who aspires to run a lathe. From what I can see of bearing on my lathes it
          appears to be a zinc alloy and none too precise...all it needs to do is
          locate end of screw that turns at a slow to moderate speed and break when
          before something else does.
          Lacking outside assistance assemble screw to lathe, block and shim it so
          unsupported end is held up and then adjust so screw is level and parallel
          to lathe bed, make your measurements to determine how thick a brass plate
          you need to use as base and diameter of brass bushing ,drill oversize
          mounting
          holes in plate and mount, place brass bushing on end of screw (assume right
          diameter to fit bearing area), remove brass plate and bushing and
          solder,drill oil hole.
          and it should work even if it needs some adjusting. I should also fail if
          stressed
          to far.
          I have not done this,but, I have a worn bearing that I may install a bushing
          in as
          I finish rebuild.
          I think if you are willing to give it a try either method I suggest would
          work well
          enough to do job....others with experience may suggest even simpler and better
          technique(s) ...there truely are many ways a cat may be skinned. It would be
          nice if all parts were available at moderate price, but, such is not the
          case. We
          who have Craftsman/Atlas lathes and mills are fortunate that a selection of
          parts,
          advice and parts blow ups are still to had from maker of our machines which
          date
          from 1930's to 1970's. Many companies either have passed from scene or don't
          support product they deem too old to make a profit supporting.
          Louis


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Pete Fels
          ... prone to ... get someone ... or more then ... methods ... of anyone ... lathes it ... do is ... break when ... it so ... parallel ... plate ... oversize
          Message 4 of 10 , Sep 22, 2002
            --- In atlas_craftsman@y..., LouD31M066@a... wrote:
            > Some elements of lathe are permanent (ways,headstock) and some are
            prone to
            > damage or loss such as screw bearing or gears. Best suggestion is
            get someone
            > with similar lathe to precisely measure bearing and then cast one
            or more then
            > file, drill and see how close you can come to a duplication. Other
            methods
            > abound.
            > I doubt not that a workable replacement is within the talent range
            of anyone
            > who aspires to run a lathe. From what I can see of bearing on my
            lathes it
            > appears to be a zinc alloy and none too precise...all it needs to
            do is
            > locate end of screw that turns at a slow to moderate speed and
            break when
            > before something else does.
            > Lacking outside assistance assemble screw to lathe, block and shim
            it so
            > unsupported end is held up and then adjust so screw is level and
            parallel
            > to lathe bed, make your measurements to determine how thick a brass
            plate
            > you need to use as base and diameter of brass bushing ,drill
            oversize
            > mounting
            > holes in plate and mount, place brass bushing on end of screw
            (assume right
            > diameter to fit bearing area), remove brass plate and bushing and
            > solder,drill oil hole.
            > and it should work even if it needs some adjusting. I should also
            fail if
            > stressed
            > to far.
            > I have not done this,but, I have a worn bearing that I may install
            a bushing
            > in as
            > I finish rebuild.
            > I think if you are willing to give it a try either method I suggest
            would
            > work well
            > enough to do job....others with experience may suggest even simpler
            and better
            > technique(s) ...there truely are many ways a cat may be skinned. It
            would be
            > nice if all parts were available at moderate price, but, such is
            not the
            > case. We
            > who have Craftsman/Atlas lathes and mills are fortunate that a
            selection of
            > parts,
            > advice and parts blow ups are still to had from maker of our
            machines which
            > date
            > from 1930's to 1970's. Many companies either have passed from scene
            or don't
            > support product they deem too old to make a profit supporting.
            > Louis


            Thank You Louis:
            A clear succinct answer...appreciated. That is about what I suspected
            and making my own parts with materials at hand is my usual path; but
            of late my insightful wife has begun to provide little economic
            summaries of the value of the time I spend on such stuff VS the cost
            of replacement ...and you know who wins usually.
            So, it seemed prudent to inquire about availability first.
            I'm still not sure if Atlas actually made this lathe, nor it's
            approximate age. How interchangable are such parts apt to be across
            such spans of time?
            .....Thanks for your help.....Pete
            >
            >
            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • LouD31M066@aol.com
            If your lathe is Sears Craftsman number beginning with 101 it was made by Atlas. The same or similar lathes were sold under Atlas name. Sears identifies maker
            Message 5 of 10 , Sep 26, 2002
              If your lathe is Sears Craftsman number beginning with 101 it was made
              by Atlas. The same or similar lathes were sold under Atlas name.
              Sears identifies maker of products with first 3 digets of model number.
              109 model lathes are by different maker and aside from gears apparently with
              no
              interchange of parts with Atlas made lathes. Other numbers beyond 101 signify
              exact product so if you call Atlas _ Clausing in Goshen Indiana have complete
              number ready so they know what you have and can get right down to business.
              I would suggest going direct to maker as Sears charges a pretty hefty markup.
              If you have an Atlas or Craftsman Atlas lathe you will find it a pretty well
              thought
              out product with a lot of quality for the price. Atlas also made a full range
              of goodies
              to make lathe usable and versatile, alas, too often not with the lathe or
              incomplete.
              ebay prices reflect interest in getting all the goodies.
              Central Standard Time (219) 533-0371 if nothing else get parts list,parts
              price list and catalog.
              Louis


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Pete Fels
              Thanks for your response Lou; What confuses me is that the # stamped at the end of the ways is L6-1657 s and lacks the 101 or 109 series #. Does this mean
              Message 6 of 10 , Sep 28, 2002
                Thanks for your response Lou;
                What confuses me is that the # stamped at the end of the ways is
                " L6-1657 s"
                and lacks the 101 or 109 series #.
                Does this mean that someone else made it? Or am I looking at the
                wrong # in the wrong place?....Pete





                --- In atlas_craftsman@y..., LouD31M066@a... wrote:
                > If your lathe is Sears Craftsman number beginning with 101 it was
                made
                > by Atlas. The same or similar lathes were sold under Atlas name.
                > Sears identifies maker of products with first 3 digets of model
                number.
                > 109 model lathes are by different maker and aside from gears
                apparently with
                > no
                > interchange of parts with Atlas made lathes. Other numbers beyond
                101 signify
                > exact product so if you call Atlas _ Clausing in Goshen Indiana
                have complete
                > number ready so they know what you have and can get right down to
                business.
                > I would suggest going direct to maker as Sears charges a pretty
                hefty markup.
                > If you have an Atlas or Craftsman Atlas lathe you will find it a
                pretty well
                > thought
                > out product with a lot of quality for the price. Atlas also made a
                full range
                > of goodies
                > to make lathe usable and versatile, alas, too often not with the
                lathe or
                > incomplete.
                > ebay prices reflect interest in getting all the goodies.
                > Central Standard Time (219) 533-0371 if nothing else get parts
                list,parts
                > price list and catalog.
                > Louis
                >
                >
                > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Cindy
                Pete, The A/C 12 lathe beds I ve had have the model number (101-07403) on the on the back of the lathe bed between the two legs. The serial number (L6-1657s,
                Message 7 of 10 , Sep 28, 2002
                  Pete, The A/C 12' lathe beds I've had have the model number (101-07403) on
                  the on the back of the lathe bed between the two legs. The serial number
                  (L6-1657s, your ser#) is stamped in the ways on the top right of the bed. my
                  Atlas 10f has the model number the right hand end of the bed and not on the
                  ways, but on a stamped steel tab riveted at the narrow base.Got any pics you
                  could send me , I am no expert , but I know what I have,and maybe you have
                  the same. I could sed you some pics if you don't have access to a digital
                  camera. Let me know, Wayne(rice)Burner
                • Pete F
                  ... Wayne; I ll go root around in the gurry between the legs ( sounds obscene) and see if I can find a model #...looked all over once but it is pretty crusty
                  Message 8 of 10 , Sep 29, 2002
                    --- In atlas_craftsman@y..., "Cindy" <burner4@a...> wrote:
                    >
                    Wayne;
                    I'll go root around in the gurry between the legs ( sounds obscene)
                    and see if I can find a model #...looked all over once but it is
                    pretty crusty and they apparently weren't being obvious about it.
                    Sorry, no digi-camera here..my wife and i are building our house bit
                    by bit and it gobbles all our bucks.
                    Would appreciate the pics for sure..try artgawk at thegrid dot net.
                    Thanks for your help....Pete


                    Pete, The A/C 12' lathe beds I've had have the model number (101-
                    07403) on
                    > the on the back of the lathe bed between the two legs. The serial
                    number
                    > (L6-1657s, your ser#) is stamped in the ways on the top right of
                    the bed. my
                    > Atlas 10f has the model number the right hand end of the bed and
                    not on the
                    > ways, but on a stamped steel tab riveted at the narrow base.Got any
                    pics you
                    > could send me , I am no expert , but I know what I have,and maybe
                    you have
                    > the same. I could sed you some pics if you don't have access to a
                    digital
                    > camera. Let me know, Wayne(rice)Burner
                  • LouD31M066@aol.com
                    L 6 1657 could be a part number, I could not identify it as such. It probably means L(lathe) 6(inch) 1657 (serial number) Tag on mine is drive riveted to
                    Message 9 of 10 , Sep 30, 2002
                      L 6 1657 could be a part number, I could not identify it as such.
                      It probably means L(lathe) 6(inch) 1657 (serial number)
                      Tag on mine is drive riveted to tailstock end of lathe bed giving both model
                      and
                      serial number as well as Sears Craftsman brand. Others may be far better
                      qualified to respond than I to this question. No doubt Atlas changed things
                      in their long
                      history so details of manufacture and identification will show variations and
                      what is true of one machine may not be true of all. I have had bed ground so
                      what might have once been there may have been erased.
                      Louis
                    • anthrhodes@aol.com
                      In a message dated Mon, 30 Sep 2002 21:08:27 EDT, Louis writes:
                      Message 10 of 10 , Oct 1, 2002
                        In a message dated Mon, 30 Sep 2002 21:08:27 EDT, Louis writes:

                        << L 6 1657 could be a part number, I could not identify it as such. It
                        probably means L(lathe) 6(inch) 1657 (serial number) >>

                        You're probably correct about it being a part number but your analysis is
                        incorrect.

                        To my knowledge, all the parts unique to the 6" lathes start out M6-xxx. The
                        6" lathes do share parts with some of the other machines. I believe the
                        spindle of the version with Oilite spindle bushings may have originated from
                        one of the 9" lathes and, of course, general hardware items are numbered in a
                        totally different sequence.

                        In the above example, L6 would indicate the machine for which the part was
                        originally designed, and 1657 would be the part number.

                        In fact Atlas often used the same part number for the same component on
                        different models. Does anyone know of a component on any Atlas built machie
                        using #1657 with a different prefix? Might help to identify what this number
                        matches.

                        Anthony
                        Berkeley, Calif.
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