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[atlas_craftsman] Re: Wood Jaws

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  • Del Keeney
    Bob, You haven t bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail; thought I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to your
    Message 1 of 8 , Feb 4, 1999
    • 0 Attachment
      Bob,

      You haven't bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail; thought
      I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to your
      response. Thanks for your response. This kind of project (cheap and
      innovative) is just the sort of thing that I like to dabble with. I
      probably will start with an aluminum plate (since I have a supply of some
      material 'scavanged' from the local scrap yard. I had thought the best
      option might be to begin with a complete circle, and cut the tongue on the
      lathe, but when I looked at the groove in the master jaws, it looked
      straight across; not curved. You've given me the interest/courage to give
      it a try. It may take me several weeks to get to the project (I'm a pastor
      with a full schedule), but I'll give it a shot. And I'll let you know how
      successful I am with the project.

      In the meantime, if you have any more suggestions or ideas, I'd be glad to
      'jaw'! I've got a 3" Arowa four jaw chuck that I'd love to convert.
      Unfortunately, it only has one piece jaws (I only have the internal set, as
      it came for my lathe). I may break down sometime and purchase one of the
      specialty wood chucks to use on my other woodturning lathes. By the way, I
      think I've spent more time rebuilding my bowl lathe than I have turning
      bowls in the last year or two. All in all, it's all recreation for me.

      Thanks for your insights (present and future).

      Del.
      -----Original Message-----
      From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
      To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
      Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 2:02 PM
      Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Wood Jaws


      >Del/Ron et al.
      > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I DO
      >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it more
      >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
      >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
      >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what you
      >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well is
      >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
      >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
      >overtightening destroys the work.
      > Buying the Nova chuck educated me to the quite different form factor
      >of wood chuck jaws. They need to contact the wood in a wider and deeper
      >pattern than metal jaws. Whatever will "surround" the wood maximally is
      >best.
      > I found that you need to start with a disk; aluminum is ok, brass or
      >steel would be longer lived. The disk needs to be about the same
      >diameter as the chuck and as thick as the jaws are deep. Then you use
      >your metal chuck to turn the "bloc"; the one-piece disk flat on the back
      >and true on the diameter. Then you turn the tongue which fits into the
      >groove of the jaws.
      > At this point there are several ways to go. You can remove the jaws
      >and use them as patterns (upside-down pointed set-screws in the holes)
      >to locate the attaching holes. Drill and countersink appropriately. Then
      >you can reinsert the jaws and attach the disk (still in one piece) onto
      >the metal chuck. Machining to shape is done en-bloc (one piece) until
      >you get the form factor you need. The final step is cutting the bloc
      >into the segments. This final step determines the "range." More metal
      >removed = greater range<grip. Less metal = lesser range>grip.
      > You see, quite unlike metal turning jaws, wood-turning jaws have a
      >relatively limited range of good holding. Since they go tremendously
      >farther around the wood in order to touch more area, what happens when
      >they are adjusted in or out is a change from a true circle to a
      >cloverleaf. That is why they frequently come in sets so that this effect
      >is minimized. The face of the jaws also is sometimes grooved or serrated
      >to jibe with the characteristics of wood. And this is why jaws are
      >sometimes made with sacrificial faces (wood/plastic/brass/aluminum) so
      >that a "perfect" fit may be obtained for great holding with no marring.
      >You CAN make almost the ENTIRE jaw of wood. More later.
      > I think you will find that, once you are set up to do the initial
      >step of forming the tongue, you may want to make several of what I call
      >"jaw-blocs." Then you can, at your leisure, decide what form factor you
      >may need or want later. At that point it is just a matter of removing
      >the metal jaws from the stub-jaws and slapping on the disk for
      >machining.
      > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not difficult.
      >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
      > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
      >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces which
      >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
      >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
      > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more on
      >this subject, post or e me.
      >Bob T
      >***
      >
      >
      >------------------------------------------------------------------------
      >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
      >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
      >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
      >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
      >
      >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
      >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
      >
      >


      ------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
    • Bob & Marilyn Tonkins
      Yeah Del, I am (was) a pastor myself, These tangible machining activities are a great anodyne for that more hard to touch human factor! I guess the post I sent
      Message 2 of 8 , Feb 4, 1999
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        Yeah Del,
        I am (was) a pastor myself,
        These tangible machining activities are a great anodyne for that more hard to
        touch human factor!
        I guess the post I sent didn't go out on the group. I wanted to share it with
        many, but twice posting it = zip. ??
        There's a gun NG that I have trouble loading too!!
        Glad you found my "jaw" post of interest
        And, imho, the technique of en bloc would still work, but you'd need to make the
        "land" (the protruding tongue) wider initially to allow machining or filing of
        (just the jaw-contact areas) to fit the stub jaw. The main feature of en-bloc is
        that it avoids the interrupted cut.
        Bob T

        Del Keeney wrote:

        > Bob,
        >
        > You haven't bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail; thought
        > I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to your
        > response. Thanks for your response. This kind of project (cheap and
        > innovative) is just the sort of thing that I like to dabble with. I
        > probably will start with an aluminum plate (since I have a supply of some
        > material 'scavanged' from the local scrap yard. I had thought the best
        > option might be to begin with a complete circle, and cut the tongue on the
        > lathe, but when I looked at the groove in the master jaws, it looked
        > straight across; not curved. You've given me the interest/courage to give
        > it a try. It may take me several weeks to get to the project (I'm a pastor
        > with a full schedule), but I'll give it a shot. And I'll let you know how
        > successful I am with the project.
        >
        > In the meantime, if you have any more suggestions or ideas, I'd be glad to
        > 'jaw'! I've got a 3" Arowa four jaw chuck that I'd love to convert.
        > Unfortunately, it only has one piece jaws (I only have the internal set, as
        > it came for my lathe). I may break down sometime and purchase one of the
        > specialty wood chucks to use on my other woodturning lathes. By the way, I
        > think I've spent more time rebuilding my bowl lathe than I have turning
        > bowls in the last year or two. All in all, it's all recreation for me.
        >
        > Thanks for your insights (present and future).
        >
        > Del.
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
        > To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
        > Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 2:02 PM
        > Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Wood Jaws
        >
        > >Del/Ron et al.
        > > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I DO
        > >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it more
        > >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
        > >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
        > >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what you
        > >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well is
        > >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
        > >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
        > >overtightening destroys the work.
        > > Buying the Nova chuck educated me to the quite different form factor
        > >of wood chuck jaws. They need to contact the wood in a wider and deeper
        > >pattern than metal jaws. Whatever will "surround" the wood maximally is
        > >best.
        > > I found that you need to start with a disk; aluminum is ok, brass or
        > >steel would be longer lived. The disk needs to be about the same
        > >diameter as the chuck and as thick as the jaws are deep. Then you use
        > >your metal chuck to turn the "bloc"; the one-piece disk flat on the back
        > >and true on the diameter. Then you turn the tongue which fits into the
        > >groove of the jaws.
        > > At this point there are several ways to go. You can remove the jaws
        > >and use them as patterns (upside-down pointed set-screws in the holes)
        > >to locate the attaching holes. Drill and countersink appropriately. Then
        > >you can reinsert the jaws and attach the disk (still in one piece) onto
        > >the metal chuck. Machining to shape is done en-bloc (one piece) until
        > >you get the form factor you need. The final step is cutting the bloc
        > >into the segments. This final step determines the "range." More metal
        > >removed = greater range<grip. Less metal = lesser range>grip.
        > > You see, quite unlike metal turning jaws, wood-turning jaws have a
        > >relatively limited range of good holding. Since they go tremendously
        > >farther around the wood in order to touch more area, what happens when
        > >they are adjusted in or out is a change from a true circle to a
        > >cloverleaf. That is why they frequently come in sets so that this effect
        > >is minimized. The face of the jaws also is sometimes grooved or serrated
        > >to jibe with the characteristics of wood. And this is why jaws are
        > >sometimes made with sacrificial faces (wood/plastic/brass/aluminum) so
        > >that a "perfect" fit may be obtained for great holding with no marring.
        > >You CAN make almost the ENTIRE jaw of wood. More later.
        > > I think you will find that, once you are set up to do the initial
        > >step of forming the tongue, you may want to make several of what I call
        > >"jaw-blocs." Then you can, at your leisure, decide what form factor you
        > >may need or want later. At that point it is just a matter of removing
        > >the metal jaws from the stub-jaws and slapping on the disk for
        > >machining.
        > > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not difficult.
        > >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
        > > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
        > >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces which
        > >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
        > >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
        > > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more on
        > >this subject, post or e me.
        > >Bob T
        > >***
        > >
        > >
        > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
        > >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
        > >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
        > >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
        > >
        > >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
        > >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
        > >
        > >
        >
        > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        > Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
        > Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
        > arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
        > Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
        >
        > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
        > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com


        ------------------------------------------------------------------------
        eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
        Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
      • Del Keeney
        Thanks, Bob. It s been a great source of alternative focus for me to work in my shop on tasks that can be both started AND completed! By the way, what is
        Message 3 of 8 , Feb 4, 1999
        • 0 Attachment
          Thanks, Bob.

          It's been a great source of 'alternative focus' for me to work in
          my shop on tasks that can be both started AND completed!

          By the way, what is IMHO? I don't know that abbreviation.
          I did'nt quite understand your comment about that in your last post.
          Could you decipher?

          Thanks a lot. Del.
          -----Original Message-----
          From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
          To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
          Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 3:42 PM
          Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wood Jaws


          >Yeah Del,
          >I am (was) a pastor myself,
          >These tangible machining activities are a great anodyne for that more hard
          to
          >touch human factor!
          >I guess the post I sent didn't go out on the group. I wanted to share it
          with
          >many, but twice posting it = zip. ??
          >There's a gun NG that I have trouble loading too!!
          >Glad you found my "jaw" post of interest
          >And, imho, the technique of en bloc would still work, but you'd need to
          make the
          >"land" (the protruding tongue) wider initially to allow machining or filing
          of
          >(just the jaw-contact areas) to fit the stub jaw. The main feature of
          en-bloc is
          >that it avoids the interrupted cut.
          >Bob T
          >
          >Del Keeney wrote:
          >
          >> Bob,
          >>
          >> You haven't bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail;
          thought
          >> I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to
          your
          >> response. Thanks for your response. This kind of project (cheap and
          >> innovative) is just the sort of thing that I like to dabble with. I
          >> probably will start with an aluminum plate (since I have a supply of some
          >> material 'scavanged' from the local scrap yard. I had thought the best
          >> option might be to begin with a complete circle, and cut the tongue on
          the
          >> lathe, but when I looked at the groove in the master jaws, it looked
          >> straight across; not curved. You've given me the interest/courage to
          give
          >> it a try. It may take me several weeks to get to the project (I'm a
          pastor
          >> with a full schedule), but I'll give it a shot. And I'll let you know
          how
          >> successful I am with the project.
          >>
          >> In the meantime, if you have any more suggestions or ideas, I'd be glad
          to
          >> 'jaw'! I've got a 3" Arowa four jaw chuck that I'd love to convert.
          >> Unfortunately, it only has one piece jaws (I only have the internal set,
          as
          >> it came for my lathe). I may break down sometime and purchase one of the
          >> specialty wood chucks to use on my other woodturning lathes. By the way,
          I
          >> think I've spent more time rebuilding my bowl lathe than I have turning
          >> bowls in the last year or two. All in all, it's all recreation for me.
          >>
          >> Thanks for your insights (present and future).
          >>
          >> Del.
          >> -----Original Message-----
          >> From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
          >> To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
          >> Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 2:02 PM
          >> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Wood Jaws
          >>
          >> >Del/Ron et al.
          >> > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I DO
          >> >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it more
          >> >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
          >> >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
          >> >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what you
          >> >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well is
          >> >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
          >> >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
          >> >overtightening destroys the work.
          >> > Buying the Nova chuck educated me to the quite different form factor
          >> >of wood chuck jaws. They need to contact the wood in a wider and deeper
          >> >pattern than metal jaws. Whatever will "surround" the wood maximally is
          >> >best.
          >> > I found that you need to start with a disk; aluminum is ok, brass or
          >> >steel would be longer lived. The disk needs to be about the same
          >> >diameter as the chuck and as thick as the jaws are deep. Then you use
          >> >your metal chuck to turn the "bloc"; the one-piece disk flat on the back
          >> >and true on the diameter. Then you turn the tongue which fits into the
          >> >groove of the jaws.
          >> > At this point there are several ways to go. You can remove the jaws
          >> >and use them as patterns (upside-down pointed set-screws in the holes)
          >> >to locate the attaching holes. Drill and countersink appropriately. Then
          >> >you can reinsert the jaws and attach the disk (still in one piece) onto
          >> >the metal chuck. Machining to shape is done en-bloc (one piece) until
          >> >you get the form factor you need. The final step is cutting the bloc
          >> >into the segments. This final step determines the "range." More metal
          >> >removed = greater range<grip. Less metal = lesser range>grip.
          >> > You see, quite unlike metal turning jaws, wood-turning jaws have a
          >> >relatively limited range of good holding. Since they go tremendously
          >> >farther around the wood in order to touch more area, what happens when
          >> >they are adjusted in or out is a change from a true circle to a
          >> >cloverleaf. That is why they frequently come in sets so that this effect
          >> >is minimized. The face of the jaws also is sometimes grooved or serrated
          >> >to jibe with the characteristics of wood. And this is why jaws are
          >> >sometimes made with sacrificial faces (wood/plastic/brass/aluminum) so
          >> >that a "perfect" fit may be obtained for great holding with no marring.
          >> >You CAN make almost the ENTIRE jaw of wood. More later.
          >> > I think you will find that, once you are set up to do the initial
          >> >step of forming the tongue, you may want to make several of what I call
          >> >"jaw-blocs." Then you can, at your leisure, decide what form factor you
          >> >may need or want later. At that point it is just a matter of removing
          >> >the metal jaws from the stub-jaws and slapping on the disk for
          >> >machining.
          >> > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not difficult.
          >> >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
          >> > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
          >> >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces which
          >> >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
          >> >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
          >> > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more on
          >> >this subject, post or e me.
          >> >Bob T
          >> >***
          >> >
          >> >
          >> >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >> >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
          >> >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
          >> >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
          >> >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
          >> >
          >> >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
          >> >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
          >> >
          >> >
          >>
          >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >> Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
          >> Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
          >> arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
          >> Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
          >>
          >> eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
          >> Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
          >
          >
          >------------------------------------------------------------------------
          >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
          >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
          >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
          >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
          >
          >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
          >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
          >
          >


          ------------------------------------------------------------------------
          eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
          Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
        • Bob & Marilyn Tonkins
          I.n M.yH.umbleO.pinion *** ... eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
          Message 4 of 8 , Feb 4, 1999
          • 0 Attachment
            I.n M.yH.umbleO.pinion
            ***

            Del Keeney wrote:

            > Thanks, Bob.
            >
            > It's been a great source of 'alternative focus' for me to work in
            > my shop on tasks that can be both started AND completed!
            >
            > By the way, what is IMHO? I don't know that abbreviation.
            > I did'nt quite understand your comment about that in your last post.
            > Could you decipher?
            >
            > Thanks a lot. Del.
            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
            > To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
            > Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 3:42 PM
            > Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wood Jaws
            >
            > >Yeah Del,
            > >I am (was) a pastor myself,
            > >These tangible machining activities are a great anodyne for that more hard
            > to
            > >touch human factor!
            > >I guess the post I sent didn't go out on the group. I wanted to share it
            > with
            > >many, but twice posting it = zip. ??
            > >There's a gun NG that I have trouble loading too!!
            > >Glad you found my "jaw" post of interest
            > >And, imho, the technique of en bloc would still work, but you'd need to
            > make the
            > >"land" (the protruding tongue) wider initially to allow machining or filing
            > of
            > >(just the jaw-contact areas) to fit the stub jaw. The main feature of
            > en-bloc is
            > >that it avoids the interrupted cut.
            > >Bob T
            > >
            > >Del Keeney wrote:
            > >
            > >> Bob,
            > >>
            > >> You haven't bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail;
            > thought
            > >> I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to
            > your
            > >> response. Thanks for your response. This kind of project (cheap and
            > >> innovative) is just the sort of thing that I like to dabble with. I
            > >> probably will start with an aluminum plate (since I have a supply of some
            > >> material 'scavanged' from the local scrap yard. I had thought the best
            > >> option might be to begin with a complete circle, and cut the tongue on
            > the
            > >> lathe, but when I looked at the groove in the master jaws, it looked
            > >> straight across; not curved. You've given me the interest/courage to
            > give
            > >> it a try. It may take me several weeks to get to the project (I'm a
            > pastor
            > >> with a full schedule), but I'll give it a shot. And I'll let you know
            > how
            > >> successful I am with the project.
            > >>
            > >> In the meantime, if you have any more suggestions or ideas, I'd be glad
            > to
            > >> 'jaw'! I've got a 3" Arowa four jaw chuck that I'd love to convert.
            > >> Unfortunately, it only has one piece jaws (I only have the internal set,
            > as
            > >> it came for my lathe). I may break down sometime and purchase one of the
            > >> specialty wood chucks to use on my other woodturning lathes. By the way,
            > I
            > >> think I've spent more time rebuilding my bowl lathe than I have turning
            > >> bowls in the last year or two. All in all, it's all recreation for me.
            > >>
            > >> Thanks for your insights (present and future).
            > >>
            > >> Del.
            > >> -----Original Message-----
            > >> From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
            > >> To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
            > >> Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 2:02 PM
            > >> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Wood Jaws
            > >>
            > >> >Del/Ron et al.
            > >> > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I DO
            > >> >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it more
            > >> >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
            > >> >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
            > >> >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what you
            > >> >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well is
            > >> >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
            > >> >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
            > >> >overtightening destroys the work.
            > >> > Buying the Nova chuck educated me to the quite different form factor
            > >> >of wood chuck jaws. They need to contact the wood in a wider and deeper
            > >> >pattern than metal jaws. Whatever will "surround" the wood maximally is
            > >> >best.
            > >> > I found that you need to start with a disk; aluminum is ok, brass or
            > >> >steel would be longer lived. The disk needs to be about the same
            > >> >diameter as the chuck and as thick as the jaws are deep. Then you use
            > >> >your metal chuck to turn the "bloc"; the one-piece disk flat on the back
            > >> >and true on the diameter. Then you turn the tongue which fits into the
            > >> >groove of the jaws.
            > >> > At this point there are several ways to go. You can remove the jaws
            > >> >and use them as patterns (upside-down pointed set-screws in the holes)
            > >> >to locate the attaching holes. Drill and countersink appropriately. Then
            > >> >you can reinsert the jaws and attach the disk (still in one piece) onto
            > >> >the metal chuck. Machining to shape is done en-bloc (one piece) until
            > >> >you get the form factor you need. The final step is cutting the bloc
            > >> >into the segments. This final step determines the "range." More metal
            > >> >removed = greater range<grip. Less metal = lesser range>grip.
            > >> > You see, quite unlike metal turning jaws, wood-turning jaws have a
            > >> >relatively limited range of good holding. Since they go tremendously
            > >> >farther around the wood in order to touch more area, what happens when
            > >> >they are adjusted in or out is a change from a true circle to a
            > >> >cloverleaf. That is why they frequently come in sets so that this effect
            > >> >is minimized. The face of the jaws also is sometimes grooved or serrated
            > >> >to jibe with the characteristics of wood. And this is why jaws are
            > >> >sometimes made with sacrificial faces (wood/plastic/brass/aluminum) so
            > >> >that a "perfect" fit may be obtained for great holding with no marring.
            > >> >You CAN make almost the ENTIRE jaw of wood. More later.
            > >> > I think you will find that, once you are set up to do the initial
            > >> >step of forming the tongue, you may want to make several of what I call
            > >> >"jaw-blocs." Then you can, at your leisure, decide what form factor you
            > >> >may need or want later. At that point it is just a matter of removing
            > >> >the metal jaws from the stub-jaws and slapping on the disk for
            > >> >machining.
            > >> > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not difficult.
            > >> >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
            > >> > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
            > >> >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces which
            > >> >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
            > >> >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
            > >> > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more on
            > >> >this subject, post or e me.
            > >> >Bob T
            > >> >***
            > >> >
            > >> >
            > >> >------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >> >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
            > >> >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
            > >> >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
            > >> >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
            > >> >
            > >> >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
            > >> >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
            > >> >
            > >> >
            > >>
            > >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >> Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
            > >> Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
            > >> arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
            > >> Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
            > >>
            > >> eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
            > >> Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
            > >
            > >
            > >------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
            > >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
            > >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
            > >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
            > >
            > >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
            > >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
            > >
            > >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            > Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
            > Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
            > arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
            > Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
            >
            > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
            > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com


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          • Del Keeney
            Got it! Thanks. ... From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com Date: Thursday, February 04,
            Message 5 of 8 , Feb 5, 1999
            • 0 Attachment
              Got it! Thanks.
              -----Original Message-----
              From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
              To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
              Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 9:40 PM
              Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wood Jaws


              >I.n M.yH.umbleO.pinion
              >***
              >
              >Del Keeney wrote:
              >
              >> Thanks, Bob.
              >>
              >> It's been a great source of 'alternative focus' for me to work in
              >> my shop on tasks that can be both started AND completed!
              >>
              >> By the way, what is IMHO? I don't know that abbreviation.
              >> I did'nt quite understand your comment about that in your last post.
              >> Could you decipher?
              >>
              >> Thanks a lot. Del.
              >> -----Original Message-----
              >> From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
              >> To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
              >> Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 3:42 PM
              >> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: Wood Jaws
              >>
              >> >Yeah Del,
              >> >I am (was) a pastor myself,
              >> >These tangible machining activities are a great anodyne for that more
              hard
              >> to
              >> >touch human factor!
              >> >I guess the post I sent didn't go out on the group. I wanted to share it
              >> with
              >> >many, but twice posting it = zip. ??
              >> >There's a gun NG that I have trouble loading too!!
              >> >Glad you found my "jaw" post of interest
              >> >And, imho, the technique of en bloc would still work, but you'd need to
              >> make the
              >> >"land" (the protruding tongue) wider initially to allow machining or
              filing
              >> of
              >> >(just the jaw-contact areas) to fit the stub jaw. The main feature of
              >> en-bloc is
              >> >that it avoids the interrupted cut.
              >> >Bob T
              >> >
              >> >Del Keeney wrote:
              >> >
              >> >> Bob,
              >> >>
              >> >> You haven't bored me at all! My apologies about the initial e-mail;
              >> thought
              >> >> I got it from Ron, but his was an additional bit of info. tacked on to
              >> your
              >> >> response. Thanks for your response. This kind of project (cheap and
              >> >> innovative) is just the sort of thing that I like to dabble with. I
              >> >> probably will start with an aluminum plate (since I have a supply of
              some
              >> >> material 'scavanged' from the local scrap yard. I had thought the
              best
              >> >> option might be to begin with a complete circle, and cut the tongue on
              >> the
              >> >> lathe, but when I looked at the groove in the master jaws, it looked
              >> >> straight across; not curved. You've given me the interest/courage to
              >> give
              >> >> it a try. It may take me several weeks to get to the project (I'm a
              >> pastor
              >> >> with a full schedule), but I'll give it a shot. And I'll let you know
              >> how
              >> >> successful I am with the project.
              >> >>
              >> >> In the meantime, if you have any more suggestions or ideas, I'd be
              glad
              >> to
              >> >> 'jaw'! I've got a 3" Arowa four jaw chuck that I'd love to convert.
              >> >> Unfortunately, it only has one piece jaws (I only have the internal
              set,
              >> as
              >> >> it came for my lathe). I may break down sometime and purchase one of
              the
              >> >> specialty wood chucks to use on my other woodturning lathes. By the
              way,
              >> I
              >> >> think I've spent more time rebuilding my bowl lathe than I have
              turning
              >> >> bowls in the last year or two. All in all, it's all recreation for
              me.
              >> >>
              >> >> Thanks for your insights (present and future).
              >> >>
              >> >> Del.
              >> >> -----Original Message-----
              >> >> From: Bob & Marilyn Tonkins <btonkins@...>
              >> >> To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
              >> >> Date: Thursday, February 04, 1999 2:02 PM
              >> >> Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Wood Jaws
              >> >>
              >> >> >Del/Ron et al.
              >> >> > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I
              DO
              >> >> >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it
              more
              >> >> >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
              >> >> >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
              >> >> >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what
              you
              >> >> >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well
              is
              >> >> >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
              >> >> >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
              >> >> >overtightening destroys the work.
              >> >> > Buying the Nova chuck educated me to the quite different form
              factor
              >> >> >of wood chuck jaws. They need to contact the wood in a wider and
              deeper
              >> >> >pattern than metal jaws. Whatever will "surround" the wood maximally
              is
              >> >> >best.
              >> >> > I found that you need to start with a disk; aluminum is ok, brass
              or
              >> >> >steel would be longer lived. The disk needs to be about the same
              >> >> >diameter as the chuck and as thick as the jaws are deep. Then you use
              >> >> >your metal chuck to turn the "bloc"; the one-piece disk flat on the
              back
              >> >> >and true on the diameter. Then you turn the tongue which fits into
              the
              >> >> >groove of the jaws.
              >> >> > At this point there are several ways to go. You can remove the
              jaws
              >> >> >and use them as patterns (upside-down pointed set-screws in the
              holes)
              >> >> >to locate the attaching holes. Drill and countersink appropriately.
              Then
              >> >> >you can reinsert the jaws and attach the disk (still in one piece)
              onto
              >> >> >the metal chuck. Machining to shape is done en-bloc (one piece) until
              >> >> >you get the form factor you need. The final step is cutting the bloc
              >> >> >into the segments. This final step determines the "range." More metal
              >> >> >removed = greater range<grip. Less metal = lesser range>grip.
              >> >> > You see, quite unlike metal turning jaws, wood-turning jaws have
              a
              >> >> >relatively limited range of good holding. Since they go tremendously
              >> >> >farther around the wood in order to touch more area, what happens
              when
              >> >> >they are adjusted in or out is a change from a true circle to a
              >> >> >cloverleaf. That is why they frequently come in sets so that this
              effect
              >> >> >is minimized. The face of the jaws also is sometimes grooved or
              serrated
              >> >> >to jibe with the characteristics of wood. And this is why jaws are
              >> >> >sometimes made with sacrificial faces (wood/plastic/brass/aluminum)
              so
              >> >> >that a "perfect" fit may be obtained for great holding with no
              marring.
              >> >> >You CAN make almost the ENTIRE jaw of wood. More later.
              >> >> > I think you will find that, once you are set up to do the initial
              >> >> >step of forming the tongue, you may want to make several of what I
              call
              >> >> >"jaw-blocs." Then you can, at your leisure, decide what form factor
              you
              >> >> >may need or want later. At that point it is just a matter of removing
              >> >> >the metal jaws from the stub-jaws and slapping on the disk for
              >> >> >machining.
              >> >> > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not
              difficult.
              >> >> >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
              >> >> > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
              >> >> >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces
              which
              >> >> >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
              >> >> >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
              >> >> > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more
              on
              >> >> >this subject, post or e me.
              >> >> >Bob T
              >> >> >***
              >> >> >
              >> >> >
              >> >>
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >> >> >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
              >> >> >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
              >> >> >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
              >> >> >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
              >> >> >
              >> >> >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
              >> >> >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
              >> >> >
              >> >> >
              >> >>
              >>
              >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >> >> Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
              >> >> Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
              >> >> arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
              >> >> Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
              >> >>
              >> >> eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
              >> >> Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >> >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
              >> >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
              >> >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
              >> >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
              >> >
              >> >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
              >> >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
              >> >
              >> >
              >>
              >> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >> Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
              >> Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
              >> arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
              >> Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
              >>
              >> eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
              >> Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
              >
              >
              >------------------------------------------------------------------------
              >Fresh flowers are the perfect way to say "I love you".
              >Shipped direct from the grower, Proflowers.com has
              >arrangements from $29.95 plus S&H.
              >Click here: http://offers.egroups.com/click/216/0
              >
              >eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
              >Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
              >
              >


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            • Ronald Thibault
              ... Snip... ... Would using a split ring made from a copper pipe or copper sheet with a metal lathe chuck work? It would spread the load over a wider area.
              Message 6 of 8 , Feb 6, 1999
              • 0 Attachment
                At 10:54 AM 2/4/99 -0800, you wrote:
                >Del/Ron et al.
                > Your post on accessory jaws for woodturning got me interested. I DO
                >use my smaller (6") Atlas for woodturning. Matter of fact, I use it more
                >for wood than metal. I have a Nova chuck which I threaded 1" x 10" to
                >fit my Atlas. I am in the process of making more jaws for it. I did
                >initially try to use my metal chuck for holding wood. I learned what you
                >probably already know, that the reason it doesn't usually work well is
                >nothing to do with the chuck. It's the "footprint" of the jaw. The
                >narrow impress allows the wood to twist out of contact. And
                >overtightening destroys the work.

                Snip...

                > The process of creating your own jaws is tedious, but not difficult.
                >And it's cheep, cheep, cheep; as the little bird said.
                > Oh! Almost forgot. DO establish as carefully as you can the true
                >diameter of the groove in your metal chuck's stub-jaws (the pieces which
                >are moved by the chuck key) That is picky, because it's such a short
                >arc, and a miscalculation results in partial contact.
                > Hope I haven't bored you with basics. If you want to "jaw" more on
                >this subject, post or e me.
                >Bob T
                >***


                Would using a split ring made from a copper pipe or copper sheet with a
                metal lathe chuck work? It would spread the load over a wider area.

                Ronald Thibault
                North Augusta, SC USA

                Builder Miinie #2
                Captain R/C Combat Ship USS Arizona
                http://www.toast.net/~thibault


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