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[atlas_craftsman] Re: No Subject

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  • SLEYKIN@aol.com
    The motor I am using IS the one from surplus center. To reverse it you have to bring the wires from the brushes out to a cross connected DPDT switch as it is
    Message 1 of 17 , Jan 1, 2000
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      The motor I am using IS the one from surplus center. To reverse it you have
      to bring the wires from the brushes out to a cross connected DPDT switch as
      it is not a PM type motor. It works very well however you should plan to run
      the motor in the CW direction for normal use and only occasionally reversing
      it for the odd things that reverse is handy for. The brushes have an
      "offset" to them that make them more efficient in the CW direction. I have
      not been able to notice any difference. These are VERY torquey motors and
      the feedback speed regulation makes them maintain a pretty constant speed
      over varying torques. There are a couple of mods you will want to do to make
      the ramp up time shorter and to let you start them at a preset speed rather
      than having to start from dead slow every time. The mods are in the 1998
      dropbox archive under treadmot or I can send them of to anyone that needs
      them/can't find them.

      Hope this helps / makes sense :)
      Glenn

      In a message dated 12/31/1999 1:51:28 PM Pacific Standard Time,
      alstrux@... writes:

      > Sent message From: alstrux@... (alfred�piszcz) Date: Fri, Dec
      > 31, 1999, 4:06pm To: sleyki-@... Subject: treadmill motor
      > Hi
      > ��������Noticed your response in the A-C user group . Is the motor you
      > are using similar to the one advertised by SURPLUS CENTER in the
      > Jan/Feb issue of HSM ? This one looks good but doesn't mention anything
      > about reverse. It only mentions CW rotation. But if it is a true DC
      > motor it should be easily reversible by using a DPDT switch shouldn't
      > it,or does that only apply to permanent magnet motors? � Any help will
      > be appreciated.
      > ������������Thank you.
      > ��������������������������������������������Al Piszcz
    • J Tiers
      For electric motors reversing means depends on type. For normal AC motors of single phase, you usually have two wires that you reverse to switch directions. It
      Message 2 of 17 , Jan 1, 2000
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        For electric motors reversing means depends on type.
        For normal AC motors of single phase, you usually have two wires that you
        reverse to switch directions. It only works when the motor is stopped or
        slowing down. This can be done with a DPDT switch. Some are not reversible.
        Three-phase motors you reverse any two wires. These will reverse from full
        speed, or "plug".
        For DC motors, Permanent magnet types are directly reversible by swapping
        leads.
        "Universal" motors like drills, vacuum cleaners etc, and probably your
        treadmill, are series motors, and you must reverse internal wires, either
        the ones going to the coil, or the ones going to the brushes, but not both.
        They also will "plug", but you may get a substantial arc.
        Another note: Most switches or relays must be derated by 10 or even 20 times
        on current or voltage if used on DC. A switch rated for 15 amps 120V AC may
        only take 1/2 amp at 90V DC. At 12V DC, it may be good for 5 or 10 amps.
        This is due to arcing, which is increased by voltage. Arcing welds the
        contacts, and causes failure as material is gradually transferred from one
        to the other. In extreme cases, the switch or relay may not actually open
        electrically, as the arc bridges the gap even when fully open physically.
        The contacts will rapidly melt in such a case.
        Jerry.

        -----Original Message-----
        From: SLEYKIN@... <SLEYKIN@...>
        To: atlas_craftsman@egroups.com <atlas_craftsman@egroups.com>
        Date: Saturday, January 01, 2000 6:45 AM
        Subject: [atlas_craftsman] Re: No Subject


        >The motor I am using IS the one from surplus center. To reverse it you
        have
        >to bring the wires from the brushes out to a cross connected DPDT switch as
        >it is not a PM type motor. It works very well however you should plan to
        run
        >the motor in the CW direction for normal use and only occasionally
        reversing
        >it for the odd things that reverse is handy for. The brushes have an
        >"offset" to them that make them more efficient in the CW direction. I have
        >not been able to notice any difference. These are VERY torquey motors and
        >the feedback speed regulation makes them maintain a pretty constant speed
        >over varying torques. There are a couple of mods you will want to do to
        make
        >the ramp up time shorter and to let you start them at a preset speed rather
        >than having to start from dead slow every time. The mods are in the 1998
        >dropbox archive under treadmot or I can send them of to anyone that needs
        >them/can't find them.
        >
        >Hope this helps / makes sense :)
        >Glenn
        >
        >In a message dated 12/31/1999 1:51:28 PM Pacific Standard Time,
        >alstrux@... writes:
        >
        >> Sent message From: alstrux@... (alfred piszcz) Date: Fri, Dec
        >> 31, 1999, 4:06pm To: sleyki-@... Subject: treadmill motor
        >> Hi
        >> Noticed your response in the A-C user group . Is the motor you
        >> are using similar to the one advertised by SURPLUS CENTER in the
        >> Jan/Feb issue of HSM ? This one looks good but doesn't mention anything
        >> about reverse. It only mentions CW rotation. But if it is a true DC
        >> motor it should be easily reversible by using a DPDT switch shouldn't
        >> it,or does that only apply to permanent magnet motors? Any help will
        >> be appreciated.
        >> Thank you.
        >> Al Piszcz
        >
        >------------------------------------------------------------------------
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      • Curt.Remer@steelcase.com
        Hello to the group, My TH54 is about ready to go back together. All that remains is my order of replacement bushings (thanks to previous owners for painting
        Message 3 of 17 , Jan 24, 2000
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          Hello to the group,

          My TH54 is about ready to go back together. All that remains is my order of
          replacement bushings (thanks to previous owners for painting the oil caps
          shut) and a few gears. Before I place my order to Clausing I thought I would
          check the group for a few of the higher dollar items.

          10A-3 Dustcover on head stock
          10A-8 Dustcover etc....
          10-1552X compound gear assembly used in the quick change box
          9-101-40A 40 tooth gear used in the quadrant assy. (mine has one tooth
          missing, can I reuse it ? )
          9-101-48A 48 tooth gear etc....
          10-1509 Spindle (main gear spindle in QC)

          341-057 Gear
          10-F11 Gear case
          6-68 Shaft
          9-102-125 Gear
          The above parts form an assy. in the "carriage apron assy."

          Let me know if anyone has any of these parts (cremer&steelcase.com) and we'll
          talk.

          Also, how long have the tapered roller bearings been used in the head stocks.
          After seeing notes about production dates being etched in races I checked mine
          and found 4-20-46. I discounted this as some kind of stock number as I thought
          there was no way these bearings are that old, after all they look new! The
          serial number on my lathe is 075464.

          I also noted my lathe (10x36) had a small oval brass plate on one end with the
          number "220" on it. I assume this belonged to a school or the like at some
          time. Has anyone had similar findings?

          Really enjoying the group, and learning a ton from the mail alone !

          Thanks again,

          Curt.
        • Whunicut@aol.com
          In a message dated 00-01-24 14:21:56 EST, you write:
          Message 4 of 17 , Jan 24, 2000
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            In a message dated 00-01-24 14:21:56 EST, you write:

            << I also noted my lathe (10x36) had a small oval brass plate on one end with
            the
            number "220" on it. I assume this belonged to a school or the like at some
            time. Has anyone had similar findings?
            >>

            This is probably a company asset number placed there by the bookkeepers of a
            company that once owned the lathe. It is common in industry to number/tag all
            their equipment.

            Warren
          • Jon Elson
            ... Oh, yes. I had a 1941 lathe with original manual. I had babbit bearings, but the book described and had pictures of Timken roller-bearing models. Jon
            Message 5 of 17 , Jan 24, 2000
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              Curt.Remer@... wrote:

              > Hello to the group,
              >
              > My TH54 is about ready to go back together.

              > Also, how long have the tapered roller bearings been used in the head stocks.
              > After seeing notes about production dates being etched in races I checked mine
              > and found 4-20-46. I discounted this as some kind of stock number as I thought
              > there was no way these bearings are that old, after all they look new! The
              > serial number on my lathe is 075464.

              Oh, yes. I had a 1941 lathe with original manual. I had babbit bearings,
              but the book described and had pictures of Timken roller-bearing models.

              Jon
            • James Davis
              I also have, for my Atlas 10 lathe, a 5 Cushman chuck that needs a little help. A new set of jaws would help quite a bit. I have emailed Cushman from their
              Message 6 of 17 , Mar 14, 2000
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                I also have, for my Atlas 10" lathe, a 5" Cushman chuck that needs a
                little
                help. A new set of jaws would help quite a bit. I have emailed Cushman
                from
                their site but have gotten no response. They have some very good deals
                on
                universal 3-jaw chucks right now, but I can't spare the money. If
                anyone knows
                of a source for jaws for these chucks, or how to get Cushman to answer,
                I'd
                like to know too.


                Jim Davis



                Subject: Cushman Chuck
                From: Mike Reames




                Last week, after fixing the carriage engage lever on my 12"Atlas (
                thanks to this group!) I now want to get my old 5" 3 jaw Cushman fixed.
                It need jaws, and I have been unable to find a source for them.... I
                bought a 6" Bison, but the cushman would be nice to have for smaller
                jobs... Any ideas, or is it obsolete and not worth the expense? Thanks,
                Mike
              • JOANIEK4570@aol.com
                I think I got this was sent to me in error I am also looking for parts for my atlas. I need bearings and a 3 jaw chuck. sorry paul kempf
                Message 7 of 17 , Mar 16, 2000
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                  I think I got this was sent to me in error I am also looking for parts for my
                  atlas. I need bearings and a 3 jaw chuck.

                  sorry
                  paul kempf
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