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[atlas_craftsman] rest follower

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  • kingmidget@aol.com
    I own a atlas 10f lathe and I m looking for a rest follower and also a QC attachment for it. Does anybody know it there is a way to convert my unit with feed
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 1, 1999
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      I own a atlas 10f lathe and I'm looking for a rest follower and also a QC
      attachment for it. Does anybody know it there is a way to convert my unit with
      feed gearbox in front to a tumbler style .

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    • Bob & Marilyn Tonkins
      K. Sorry I can t answer your machine parts needs, but . . . (and this is posted to you alone), the term is follow rest. Just trying to protect you from
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 1, 1999
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        K.
        Sorry I can't answer your machine parts needs, but . . . (and this is posted to
        you alone), the term is "follow rest." Just trying to protect you from teasing.
        Hope you
        get your gear
        Bob T
        ***
        kingmidget@... wrote:

        > I own a atlas 10f lathe and I'm looking for a rest follower and also a QC
        > attachment for it. Does anybody know it there is a way to convert my unit with
        > feed gearbox in front to a tumbler style .
        >
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      • Jon Elson
        ... I had an Atlas TH54 (10 x 24 ) babbit bearing, change-gear lathe. I converted it to quick change. If it has the 3/4 leadscrew, it is a slide-right-in
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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          kingmidget@... wrote:

          > I own a atlas 10f lathe and I'm looking for a rest follower and also a QC
          > attachment for it. Does anybody know it there is a way to convert my unit with
          > feed gearbox in front to a tumbler style .

          I had an Atlas TH54 (10 x 24") babbit bearing, change-gear lathe. I converted
          it to quick change. If it has the 3/4" leadscrew, it is a slide-right-in fit.
          The
          reversing gearbox and the 'harp' bracket for the change gears comes off,
          and the quick-change slides onto the leadscrew and attaches to the same bolt
          holes in the bed. The tumbler reversing gear and all the other components
          attach to these parts. The safety covers all have to be changed. Keep your
          change gears, as there is a place provided where you can install special
          gear ratios to get extremely fine feeds or very coarse threads, or approximate
          metric threads. After having a quick-change, I'd NEVER go back to a change
          gear lathe!

          Jon


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        • Martin A. Escarcega
          Jon, glad you ve been there and done that. My lathe has change gears. I did buy a QC box for it, it looks like it will bolt right on. However where the
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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            Jon, glad you've been there and done that. My lathe has change gears. I
            did buy a QC box for it, it looks like it will bolt right on. However
            where the leadscrew goes into the box, I can tell how the box "keys" to
            the shaft. I've felt in the opening and feel no key feels pretty smooth,
            so that one has me perplexed a bit. Hopefully you can help shed some light
            on that. I'll have to leave my covers off and Clausing has no replacement
            covers for the machines with or without QC.

            Anyone have a junk lathe with QC that wants to sell their covers? :-)

            Marty

            On Tue, 2 Feb 1999, Jon Elson wrote:

            >
            >
            > kingmidget@... wrote:
            >
            > > I own a atlas 10f lathe and I'm looking for a rest follower and also a QC
            > > attachment for it. Does anybody know it there is a way to convert my unit with
            > > feed gearbox in front to a tumbler style .
            >
            > I had an Atlas TH54 (10 x 24") babbit bearing, change-gear lathe. I converted
            > it to quick change. If it has the 3/4" leadscrew, it is a slide-right-in fit.
            > The
            > reversing gearbox and the 'harp' bracket for the change gears comes off,
            > and the quick-change slides onto the leadscrew and attaches to the same bolt
            > holes in the bed. The tumbler reversing gear and all the other components
            > attach to these parts. The safety covers all have to be changed. Keep your
            > change gears, as there is a place provided where you can install special
            > gear ratios to get extremely fine feeds or very coarse threads, or approximate
            > metric threads. After having a quick-change, I'd NEVER go back to a change
            > gear lathe!
            >
            > Jon
            >
            >
            > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
            >
            >
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            >
            >
            >


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          • Bob & Marilyn Tonkins
            Harry, you lucky dog! Sometimes I have a dream that I go to a gummint auction and I buy an old semi-trailer. When I get it home I find a complete machine
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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              Harry, you lucky dog!
              Sometimes I have a dream that I go to a "gummint" auction and I buy an old
              semi-trailer. When I get it home I find a complete machine shop in there. You
              know, they EXISTED; were even pallet dropped to areas like tank battles. Many
              ships had complete machine shops; could turn just about anything except the
              main shaft. Heck, they even had them on sub tenders.
              Ah well, you've come as close as anyone to my dream!
              Enjoy!
              Bob T
              ***

              Harry Wade wrote:

              > List,
              > It's a slow afternoon so thought I'd tell you about my Atlas 10 which
              > was my first lathe and a strange bird. I got this lathe years ago through
              > a friend in the aerospace business in Huntsville Ala,and it's probably
              > originally a 1952-53 vintage machine. As he told it, his company bought a
              > line of large punch presses out of a plant in Miami Fla and the sale
              > included a line of 50 Atlas 10x36's. The lathes were of no use to the
              > company so they were sold off to employees as-is, some of them literally in
              > baskets. My friend got one and eventually got one for me from another
              > employee who didn't want to fool with putting his back together. A price
              > of $100, w/motor w/o tooling, was agreed upon, the only assurance being
              > that the basic machine was complete. All of this took place circa 1971-72.
              > After disassembly and stripping the machine of years of accumulated
              > white (??) paint and grime, I discovered several curious things. First of
              > course was the white paint. Next was that it essentially had a brand new
              > bed, not a 10" bed but a 12", which you may or may not know is heavier and
              > thicker in the ways than the 10" bed. It also had a complete new carriage
              > and cross slide from a 12". It appeared I had what was essentially a new
              > machine.
              > A few questions brought the answers. The white paint was there because
              > these machines supposedly had been on a line that was subject to periodic
              > Gov't inspection and it was easier to spif them up with a coat of white
              > paint than to give them a proper cleaning. The last layer underneath the
              > goop was good old Atlas gray. The new bed was there because the machines
              > had been used in repetitive work and some the original beds had worn out in
              > one spot and those machines got new beds. By this time 10" beds were no
              > longer available so they ordered new 12" beds. When those came it was
              > discovered that the standard 10" carriage didn't fit the new beds so new
              > carriages were ordered and installed. Shortly after the new components
              > were installed the lathe line was shut down and sold.
              > So what I ended up with is a sort of a Hermaphrodite 10, a 10"
              > headstock, tailstock, and compound on a 12" bed and carriage, all
              > essentially new, or was when I got it. It has made for a very stiff
              > machine, stiffer than either a 10" or a 12" in their original forms. Even
              > though I've had it along time, it's still not got all that amny hours on it
              > and is in first class shape, including the bed. However, it does need to
              > be stripped down and given a fresh coat of white paint. :-)
              >
              > Regards,
              > Harry Wade
              > Nashville Tn
              >
              > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
              > Backing up has never been easier. Here's an automatic,
              > Hassle free way to protect your valuable data without
              > Extra hardware. Download, install and try @Backup.
              > http://offers.egroups.com/click/215/1
              >
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            • Martin A. Escarcega
              Great story Harry, that machine led an interesting life. So, last but not least what kind of things has it turned out for the latest owner? ;-) Marty ...
              Message 6 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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                Great story Harry, that machine led an interesting life. So, last but not
                least what kind of things has it turned out for the latest owner? ;-)

                Marty


                -------------------------------------------------------------------------------

                On Tue, 2 Feb 1999, Harry Wade wrote:

                > List,
                > It's a slow afternoon so thought I'd tell you about my Atlas 10 which
                > was my first lathe and a strange bird. I got this lathe years ago through
                > a friend in the aerospace business in Huntsville Ala,and it's probably
                > originally a 1952-53 vintage machine. As he told it, his company bought a
                > line of large punch presses out of a plant in Miami Fla and the sale
                > included a line of 50 Atlas 10x36's. The lathes were of no use to the
                > company so they were sold off to employees as-is, some of them literally in
                > baskets. My friend got one and eventually got one for me from another
                > employee who didn't want to fool with putting his back together. A price
                > of $100, w/motor w/o tooling, was agreed upon, the only assurance being
                > that the basic machine was complete. All of this took place circa 1971-72.
                > After disassembly and stripping the machine of years of accumulated
                > white (??) paint and grime, I discovered several curious things. First of
                > course was the white paint. Next was that it essentially had a brand new
                > bed, not a 10" bed but a 12", which you may or may not know is heavier and
                > thicker in the ways than the 10" bed. It also had a complete new carriage
                > and cross slide from a 12". It appeared I had what was essentially a new
                > machine.
                > A few questions brought the answers. The white paint was there because
                > these machines supposedly had been on a line that was subject to periodic
                > Gov't inspection and it was easier to spif them up with a coat of white
                > paint than to give them a proper cleaning. The last layer underneath the
                > goop was good old Atlas gray. The new bed was there because the machines
                > had been used in repetitive work and some the original beds had worn out in
                > one spot and those machines got new beds. By this time 10" beds were no
                > longer available so they ordered new 12" beds. When those came it was
                > discovered that the standard 10" carriage didn't fit the new beds so new
                > carriages were ordered and installed. Shortly after the new components
                > were installed the lathe line was shut down and sold.
                > So what I ended up with is a sort of a Hermaphrodite 10, a 10"
                > headstock, tailstock, and compound on a 12" bed and carriage, all
                > essentially new, or was when I got it. It has made for a very stiff
                > machine, stiffer than either a 10" or a 12" in their original forms. Even
                > though I've had it along time, it's still not got all that amny hours on it
                > and is in first class shape, including the bed. However, it does need to
                > be stripped down and given a fresh coat of white paint. :-)
                >
                > Regards,
                > Harry Wade
                > Nashville Tn
                >
                > ------------------------------------------------------------------------
                > Backing up has never been easier. Here's an automatic,
                > Hassle free way to protect your valuable data without
                > Extra hardware. Download, install and try @Backup.
                > http://offers.egroups.com/click/215/1
                >
                > eGroup home: http://www.eGroups.com/list/atlas_craftsman
                > Free Web-based e-mail groups by eGroups.com
                >
                >
                >


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              • Harry Wade
                List, It s a slow afternoon so thought I d tell you about my Atlas 10 which was my first lathe and a strange bird. I got this lathe years ago through a
                Message 7 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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                  List,
                  It's a slow afternoon so thought I'd tell you about my Atlas 10 which
                  was my first lathe and a strange bird. I got this lathe years ago through
                  a friend in the aerospace business in Huntsville Ala,and it's probably
                  originally a 1952-53 vintage machine. As he told it, his company bought a
                  line of large punch presses out of a plant in Miami Fla and the sale
                  included a line of 50 Atlas 10x36's. The lathes were of no use to the
                  company so they were sold off to employees as-is, some of them literally in
                  baskets. My friend got one and eventually got one for me from another
                  employee who didn't want to fool with putting his back together. A price
                  of $100, w/motor w/o tooling, was agreed upon, the only assurance being
                  that the basic machine was complete. All of this took place circa 1971-72.
                  After disassembly and stripping the machine of years of accumulated
                  white (??) paint and grime, I discovered several curious things. First of
                  course was the white paint. Next was that it essentially had a brand new
                  bed, not a 10" bed but a 12", which you may or may not know is heavier and
                  thicker in the ways than the 10" bed. It also had a complete new carriage
                  and cross slide from a 12". It appeared I had what was essentially a new
                  machine.
                  A few questions brought the answers. The white paint was there because
                  these machines supposedly had been on a line that was subject to periodic
                  Gov't inspection and it was easier to spif them up with a coat of white
                  paint than to give them a proper cleaning. The last layer underneath the
                  goop was good old Atlas gray. The new bed was there because the machines
                  had been used in repetitive work and some the original beds had worn out in
                  one spot and those machines got new beds. By this time 10" beds were no
                  longer available so they ordered new 12" beds. When those came it was
                  discovered that the standard 10" carriage didn't fit the new beds so new
                  carriages were ordered and installed. Shortly after the new components
                  were installed the lathe line was shut down and sold.
                  So what I ended up with is a sort of a Hermaphrodite 10, a 10"
                  headstock, tailstock, and compound on a 12" bed and carriage, all
                  essentially new, or was when I got it. It has made for a very stiff
                  machine, stiffer than either a 10" or a 12" in their original forms. Even
                  though I've had it along time, it's still not got all that amny hours on it
                  and is in first class shape, including the bed. However, it does need to
                  be stripped down and given a fresh coat of white paint. :-)

                  Regards,
                  Harry Wade
                  Nashville Tn

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                • Harry Wade
                  ... But Bob, I haven t gotten to the bad points yet, and also, when you re only making $80 a week and have a wife and baby, $100 is a bloody fortune. Cheers,
                  Message 8 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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                    At 12:46 PM 2/2/99 -0800, you wrote:
                    >Harry, you lucky dog!
                    >Enjoy!
                    >Bob T

                    But Bob, I haven't gotten to the bad points yet, and also, when you're only
                    making $80 a week and have a wife and baby, $100 is a bloody fortune.

                    Cheers,
                    Harry


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                  • Harry Wade
                    By the way mine is a Timken bearing, change gear model, no serial number because the original bed was replaced. At the time I restored it I did a nut by bolt
                    Message 9 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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                      By the way mine is a Timken bearing, change gear model, no serial
                      number because the original bed was replaced. At the time I restored it I
                      did a nut by bolt restoration and Clausing still had all the non-cast iron
                      parts. However, they weren't cheap then. A new spindle bull gear was
                      needed but that was over $45.00 from Clausing, in 1971 dollars.
                      I wondered if Sears might by accident still have a few parts laying
                      around in a warehouse somewhere so I checked with the local Sears parts
                      counter but they were clueless about lathes and they were still on
                      microfiche and couldn't find one for the larger lathes at all, which I
                      think were gone from their catalogues by that time. They said get us a
                      catalogue number and they'd try again, so I found a number in an old
                      catalogue and with that they found the microfiche right away. After a
                      phone call the counter guy, with a straight face, says "You're not going
                      to like this. We've got this part in Memphis allright, but it's going to
                      cost you $11.45, cash in front, and it's gonna take two days to get here."




                      You can imagine how disappointed I was to hear that.



                      Regards,
                      Harry Wade
                      Nashville Tn

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                    • Jon Elson
                      ... Yup, that is a confusing setup. The way it is done is you set the key into the leadscrew slot, and then slide the quickchange box onto the screw shaft.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Feb 2, 1999
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                        Martin A. Escarcega wrote:

                        > Jon, glad you've been there and done that. My lathe has change gears. I
                        > did buy a QC box for it, it looks like it will bolt right on. However
                        > where the leadscrew goes into the box, I can tell how the box "keys" to
                        > the shaft. I've felt in the opening and feel no key feels pretty smooth,
                        > so that one has me perplexed a bit. Hopefully you can help shed some light
                        > on that. I'll have to leave my covers off and Clausing has no replacement
                        > covers for the machines with or without QC.

                        Yup, that is a confusing setup. The way it is done is you set the
                        key into the leadscrew slot, and then slide the quickchange box onto
                        the screw shaft. That slides the key into the slot made for it in the
                        drive gear. At least, I think that's how you do it, the key was in the
                        gear, and tight, when I got my gearbox. But, the guy I got it from
                        warned me that the key can fall out, and it is difficult to put back
                        in place when it does fall out. I'll look at my documentation and
                        see what it says about that key. If the hollow shaft that the screw
                        slides into won't accept the key, (which kind of sounds like it might
                        have to be that way) then you need to pull out the drive gear and
                        get the key inserted into it before you assemble the gearbox and the
                        leadscrew. Anyway, I'll get back to you if I can find anything that
                        shows how the two pieces are supposed to mate up. If the key
                        will stay put in the gear, then it is real easy. (There is a possibility
                        that the key is cast into the Zamak gear, and has sheared off.
                        This happened to a different gear in the other end of an Atlas QC
                        that I helped a guy with. You then make a slot in the gear, and
                        hand fit a key into it.)

                        Otherwise, I still have the covers from my PRE-QC 10",
                        but sold the QC version of the covers when I sold that lathe.
                        I now have a 12" Atlas, which still has a lot of parts commonality
                        with the 10". J. C. Boegeman in Arizona sold me the QC and
                        the covers that go with it.

                        Jon


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