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Re: [atlas_craftsman] What is a Tool Post grinder used for?

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  • Jon Elson
    ... Our shop at work has 2 Hardinge lathes. They are beautiful machines, too! ... Gee, nice to have somebody with those skills in the family! You re lucky.
    Message 1 of 16 , Sep 30, 2001
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      Richard Parker wrote:

      > >
      > >
      > >About the only place you need this kind of stuff is air bearings, and even
      > >there, .0001" is plenty of accuracy in most cases.
      >
      > Sure is. I used to grind this kind of stuff on a little Harig Super 618
      > surface grinder, holding short work in a Duo-Form and longer work between
      > centers in a nice little motorized spin fixture I built. A tenth is plenty,
      > for this kind of work.
      >
      > > I was just seeing
      > >how far I could take the process with my existing tools, and I found
      > >I COULD control it down to the point where I could no longer see the
      > >difference on a tenth-reading mike.
      >
      > It's fun to do, isn't it? The last shop I worked in had an older Hardinge
      > toolroom lathe, but it was a real creampuff. I "adopted" it, and made a pet
      > out of it. The accuracy was eye-watering. We had a good TP grinder for it
      > and I always wanted to try grinding some thread gages on it - but I never
      > got around to it. I'm sure that old girl was up to it, though.

      Our shop at work has 2 Hardinge lathes. They are beautiful machines, too!

      > However, I get a real charge out of doing similar stuff on my '57 SB 9"
      > Model "A" Underdrive. The machine was wrecked when I inherited it, came out
      > of a high school shop in pieces. I had to put about $1300 into it,
      > including having my Brother Dale do some very tricky cast-iron welding. It
      > had been crashed pretty bad. (He's a machinery rebuilder, and does some
      > uncanny scraping as well).

      Gee, nice to have somebody with those skills in the family! You're lucky.

      Jon
    • Richard Parker
      ... They certainly are, Jon. I personally love the Reeves-drive spindle speed control, and the threading arrangement. That little cam lever on the compound is
      Message 2 of 16 , Oct 1, 2001
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        >
        >Our shop at work has 2 Hardinge lathes. They are beautiful machines,
        >too!

        They certainly are, Jon. I personally love the Reeves-drive spindle speed
        control, and the threading arrangement. That little cam lever on the
        compound is a dream, I love being on the lead screw the entire time the
        thread is being chased. Also, the way you can set the stop to kick the
        carriage into neutral at the end of the thread is a great idea - talk about
        getting close to a shoulder, it's a "no brainer" on the Hardinge.

        Not to mention that massive dovetail bed - the Hardinge certainly was a
        radical departure from common lathe-building practice!



        We had three of 'em at the last shop I worked in, but two of 'em were so
        badly pounded on that it was absolutely criminal. And they were the two
        NEWER machines! The one that I "adopted" was probably about 50 years old,
        but it was phenominal.


        > > However, I get a real charge out of doing similar stuff on my '57 SB 9"
        > > Model "A" Underdrive. The machine was wrecked when I inherited it, came out
        > > of a high school shop in pieces. I had to put about $1300 into it,
        > > including having my Brother Dale do some very tricky cast-iron welding. It
        > > had been crashed pretty bad. (He's a machinery rebuilder, and does some
        > > uncanny scraping as well).
        >
        >Gee, nice to have somebody with those skills in the family! You're
        >lucky.

        Yeah, I sure am. Dale's a great guy, but he's still in Upstate New York -
        so, about all he can do for me anymore is advise me by phone :-(

        He used to work for the government, spent 30 years mainly rebuilding
        Monarch toolroom lathes. I've never worked on one (let alone seen one "in
        the flesh"), but the photos I've seen suggest that they're beautiful. Dale
        says they're unbeliveable machines.

        Rich
      • Robert McDonald
        ... I would go to extreme lengths to own a decent condition Monarch toolroom lathe. :-) The first machining job I had was turning titanium components for jet
        Message 3 of 16 , Oct 1, 2001
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          At 06:34 AM 10/01/01 -0400, Richard Parker wrote:
          > .....
          >He used to work for the government, spent 30 years mainly rebuilding
          >Monarch toolroom lathes. I've never worked on one (let alone seen one "in
          >the flesh"), but the photos I've seen suggest that they're beautiful. Dale
          >says they're unbeliveable machines.

          I would go to extreme lengths to own a decent condition Monarch toolroom
          lathe. :-)

          The first machining job I had was turning titanium components for jet
          engines on a 24" swing Monarch. What a wonderful lathe. The tolerances we
          worked to were mind boggling. They were about 15 years old at the time. We
          got a couple of brand new lathes from the orient for the same work. I don't
          think they were able to meet the tolerance requirements.

          Rob
        • Richard Parker
          ... I hear you! ... I believe it. I ve got an older Jet mill that s sort of like a smaller version of a step pulley J head, only it also has a horizontal
          Message 4 of 16 , Oct 1, 2001
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            >
            >
            >I would go to extreme lengths to own a decent condition Monarch toolroom
            >lathe. :-)

            I hear you!


            >The first machining job I had was turning titanium components for jet
            >engines on a 24" swing Monarch. What a wonderful lathe. The tolerances we
            >worked to were mind boggling. They were about 15 years old at the time. We
            >got a couple of brand new lathes from the orient for the same work. I don't
            >think they were able to meet the tolerance requirements.

            I believe it. I've got an older Jet mill that's sort of like a smaller
            version of a step pulley "J" head, only it also has a horizontal spindle w/
            seperate drive coming through the base casting between the Z-axis ways. It
            was a "gift horse", and it's really not a bad little machine - so I can't
            rightly bitch about it. But the oriental machines just aren't the equal of
            U.S. machine tools.

            I also ran an Okuma MC4-VAE vertical center for about a year, and it was a
            damn fine machine. Somehow though, it just wasn't the same as a good U.S.
            machine.

            I'm with you, Rob. I'd love to get a Monarch in here somehow, the bigger
            the better. I've worked with a lot of machine tools over the past 20 years
            in the trade - and I'd take an old, whipped U.S. machine over a new japper
            anyday.

            Best,

            Rich
          • anthrhodes@aol.com
            In a message dated Mon, 01 Oct 2001 12:56:33 -0400, Robert McDonald writes:
            Message 5 of 16 , Oct 1, 2001
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              In a message dated Mon, 01 Oct 2001 12:56:33 -0400, Robert McDonald writes:

              << I would go to extreme lengths to own a decent condition Monarch toolroom
              lathe. :-) >>

              Another make that ain't bad is Rivett, a 1020 or a 1030.

              Anthony
              Berkeley, Calif.
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