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another newbie

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  • johnt49@hotmail.com
    Greetings, My name is John Twinem. I recently acquired an Atlas 618, or should I say 3/4 of one. I m missing some crucial parts & wondering if anyone can help.
    Message 1 of 7 , Jun 30, 2001
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      Greetings, My name is John Twinem. I recently acquired an Atlas 618,
      or should I say 3/4 of one. I'm missing some crucial parts & wondering
      if anyone can help. I need a complete tailstock assy, countershaft
      assy, tool post, both gear covers (headstock & side gears),cross slide
      screw handle, keyway,& nut, & the compound slide ( the cast iron part
      the tool post T nut slides into). Mine's broken where the T nut slides
      in & the foward half is missing, but the rest of the compound is in
      good condition. The rest of the lathe is in very good shape ... ways,
      headstock, carriage, etc.
      This lathe only has a 4 jaw chuck with independent adjustments. How do
      I go about centering work in it? Would it be worth getting a self
      centering chuck with one adjustment?
      The only number I can find on the lathe is on the right end of the
      ways - M4628. Does anyone have an idea of the vintage, or how would I
      find out?
      This is my first lathe & I'm looking foward to getting it working.

      Thanks,

      John
    • flagstaff11010@yahoo.com
      Hi John: Welcome to the group. Kinda new myself, alot of good guys here that helped me out also. I highly recomend getting a 3 jaw chuck it will make life
      Message 2 of 7 , Jun 30, 2001
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        Hi John: Welcome to the group. Kinda new myself, alot of good guys
        here that helped me out also.

        I highly recomend getting a 3 jaw chuck it will make life much
        easyier,but hold on to the 4 jaw for when you get more advanced. As
        for parts check out ebay. Someone is always selling stuff for them.
        Also Clausing service center still has parts for atlas. Look through
        the previous posts for their web address. Hope this Helps Cliff

        -



        -- In atlas_craftsman@y..., johnt49@h... wrote:
        > Greetings, My name is John Twinem. I recently acquired an Atlas
        618,
        > or should I say 3/4 of one. I'm missing some crucial parts &
        wondering
        > if anyone can help. I need a complete tailstock assy, countershaft
        > assy, tool post, both gear covers (headstock & side gears),cross
        slide
        > screw handle, keyway,& nut, & the compound slide ( the cast iron
        part
        > the tool post T nut slides into). Mine's broken where the T nut
        slides
        > in & the foward half is missing, but the rest of the compound is in
        > good condition. The rest of the lathe is in very good shape ...
        ways,
        > headstock, carriage, etc.
        > This lathe only has a 4 jaw chuck with independent adjustments. How
        do
        > I go about centering work in it? Would it be worth getting a self
        > centering chuck with one adjustment?
        > The only number I can find on the lathe is on the right end of the
        > ways - M4628. Does anyone have an idea of the vintage, or how would
        I
        > find out?
        > This is my first lathe & I'm looking foward to getting it working.
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > John
      • fmmach@aol.com
        Message 3 of 7 , Jun 30, 2001
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        • cravdraa@yahoo.com
          Hello John, welcome to the club. I am the other ultimate newby. I don t know machining. I bought a 618 on Ebay, it will be here monday, I ve never touched a
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 1 5:28 AM
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            Hello John, welcome to the club. I am the other ultimate newby. I
            don't know machining. I bought a 618 on Ebay, it will be here monday,
            I've never touched a lathe. I called Clausing Industrial, talk to
            Jolene, and ordered a parts price list, owners manual, and picture
            catalog all for $5.00 + $1.18 postage. I got it, and it is very worth
            while. Soon I will buy their book (by Jolene's recommendation) "Lathe
            Operations and machinist's tables", $25.00. But the $5.00 package is
            highly worth it. There are no castings for the counter-shaft bracket
            at the company, but there is every other part for it. That bracket
            will be a hard search, in the last four months of learning about
            machines and studying Ebay I have never seen one for a 618, on it's
            own at Ebay. Currently there is a counter-shaft assembly for a 12"
            swing Atlas on Ebay, more than likely it will work for you, If you
            get it you will need longer belts, I beleive Jolene can break that
            down for you, I could be wrong. A counter-shaft is essential for back-
            gear use in threading and finishing, I have learned.

            This Ebay sale ends monday July 2nd, at 1:30 pm:

            http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1610747231

            There is no reserve price.

            Good luck, Alex
          • johnt49@hotmail.com
            Thanks Alex, Will call Jolene Mon & order the $5.00 package. I ll just have to keep my eyes open for the parts. I check e bay regularly. I have a friend with a
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 1 9:30 AM
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              Thanks Alex,
              Will call Jolene Mon & order the $5.00 package. I'll just have to
              keep my eyes open for the parts. I check e bay regularly. I have a
              friend with a 618. If I strike out on the counter shaft I can take
              measurements off his & make something up. I looked at the 10"
              countershaft assy on e bay. Judging from the picture it might be
              easier to start from scratch than try to modify that one. Good luck
              with yours.

              Thanks again,

              John

              --- In atlas_craftsman@y..., cravdraa@y... wrote:
              > Hello John, welcome to the club. I am the other ultimate newby. I
              > don't know machining. I bought a 618 on Ebay, it will be here
              monday,
              > I've never touched a lathe. I called Clausing Industrial, talk to
              > Jolene, and ordered a parts price list, owners manual, and picture
              > catalog all for $5.00 + $1.18 postage. I got it, and it is very
              worth
              > while. Soon I will buy their book (by Jolene's recommendation)
              "Lathe
              > Operations and machinist's tables", $25.00. But the $5.00 package is
              > highly worth it. There are no castings for the counter-shaft bracket
              > at the company, but there is every other part for it. That bracket
              > will be a hard search, in the last four months of learning about
              > machines and studying Ebay I have never seen one for a 618, on it's
              > own at Ebay. Currently there is a counter-shaft assembly for a 12"
              > swing Atlas on Ebay, more than likely it will work for you, If you
              > get it you will need longer belts, I beleive Jolene can break that
              > down for you, I could be wrong. A counter-shaft is essential for
              back-
              > gear use in threading and finishing, I have learned.
              >
              > This Ebay sale ends monday July 2nd, at 1:30 pm:
              >
              > http://cgi.ebay.com/aw-cgi/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=1610747231
              >
              > There is no reserve price.
              >
              > Good luck, Alex
            • Bob May
              Four jaw chucks are actually better for machining if you want to do close precision work as you can always recenter the work to where it was before. What you
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 1 11:30 AM
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                Four jaw chucks are actually better for machining if you want to do close
                precision work as you can always recenter the work to where it was before.
                What you do is to grab a dial test indicator and a stand and put it on the
                machine with a magnetic chuck so that you can indicate what the runout of
                the work is. Using pairs of opposite jaws, you gradually get the work to
                where the needle just quivers as you hand rotate the work in the chuck. It
                takes a while to learn the process but after a while, you will become quite
                familiar with it and be able to properly chuck something in there very
                quickly.
                Another good thing about the 4 jaw chuck is that it holds square stock
                easily and the dimensions don't need to be the same either.
                A 3 jaw chuck is a lot more troublesome in operation as you can't chuck up
                square stock, you have to mark where a jaw was if you ever remove the work
                and then hope that that mark will allow you to get close to the same
                position in the chuck again so you don't have to go over all of the surfaces
                again.
                Bob May
                http://nav.to/bobmay
                bobmay@...
              • johnt49@hotmail.com
                Bob, Thanks for the advise. I ll give it a try. John ... close ... before. ... on the ... runout of ... work to ... chuck. It ... become quite ... very ...
                Message 7 of 7 , Jul 2 6:39 AM
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                  Bob,
                  Thanks for the advise. I'll give it a try.

                  John



                  -- In atlas_craftsman@y..., "Bob May" <bobmay@n...> wrote:
                  > Four jaw chucks are actually better for machining if you want to do
                  close
                  > precision work as you can always recenter the work to where it was
                  before.
                  > What you do is to grab a dial test indicator and a stand and put it
                  on the
                  > machine with a magnetic chuck so that you can indicate what the
                  runout of
                  > the work is. Using pairs of opposite jaws, you gradually get the
                  work to
                  > where the needle just quivers as you hand rotate the work in the
                  chuck. It
                  > takes a while to learn the process but after a while, you will
                  become quite
                  > familiar with it and be able to properly chuck something in there
                  very
                  > quickly.
                  > Another good thing about the 4 jaw chuck is that it holds square
                  stock
                  > easily and the dimensions don't need to be the same either.
                  > A 3 jaw chuck is a lot more troublesome in operation as you can't
                  chuck up
                  > square stock, you have to mark where a jaw was if you ever remove
                  the work
                  > and then hope that that mark will allow you to get close to the same
                  > position in the chuck again so you don't have to go over all of the
                  surfaces
                  > again.
                  > Bob May
                  > http://nav.to/bobmay
                  > bobmay@n...
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