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2721[atlas_craftsman] Re: atlas/craftsman 12"

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  • Jon Elson
    Mar 1, 2000
      epotter wrote:

      > Hi, this is a dumb thing to ask, but am I right in thinking the power feed
      > parallel to the bed can only be effected by closing the half-nut, as if
      > threading? I would so much like to be told that there is a mechanism to
      > engage the groove in the screw, so as not to wear the screw unduly.

      The Atlas lathes have no separate power feed. But, since it DOES tap
      power off the leadscrew for the crossfeed, I don't think it would be real hard
      to rig up some sort of power feed, using the existing drive. There is a
      long bevel gear that fits around the leadscrew, and has an internal keyway.
      It turns a large bevel gear, which also has a spur gear attached to it, which
      can engage the cross feed. (That's your knobless shaft below.) You
      could put in another gear to pick up power off that gear and transfer it
      to the handwheel gear train, which is just to the left of the power feed works.

      I'm not too sure what speed you'll get, and whether it will be real smooth,
      or have a cyclical pattern to it.

      >
      > Mine has a few bits missing, there is a shaft with no knob almost directly
      > under the compound rest, which I suppose is for engaging the transverse
      > power feed? There at present are the large handwheel for manually moving
      > the apron along the bed, and the lever at the right for engaging the
      > half-nut. The shaft without a knob is in the centre of the apron. There
      > is no lever with a black plastic ball in that location, as shown in a
      > picture of the lathe.

      My 12" (and my 10" before it) have a sort of mushroom-like metal knob,
      that rotates with the power feed, for engaging the cross feed. You pull to
      engage, push to disengage. When disengaging, it works a lot better if
      you advance the cross feed a bit manually, to take the load off the gears
      when trying to disengage them.

      Jon
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