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[COMMUNITY] Trail-blazing Speakers on Education: Harry & Rosemary Wong

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  • madchinaman
    Harry Wong http://icl.uwf.edu/hwong.cfm http://www.squidoo.com/educate24-7/ http://www.effectiveteaching.com/product/index.htm Teaching Ideas:
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 4, 2006
      Harry Wong
      http://icl.uwf.edu/hwong.cfm
      http://www.squidoo.com/educate24-7/
      http://www.effectiveteaching.com/product/index.htm
      Teaching Ideas: http://www.effectiveteaching.com/
      Harry Wong Publiciations: http://www.effectiveteaching.com/
      Website: http://www.harrywong.com/
      Website: http://teachers.net/wong/OCT06/
      Teaching Building Blocks: http://www.msdpt.k12.in.us/TLA/tla%20wong%
      20topics.htm
      Past Columns: http://teachers.net/wong/


      Harry K. Wong is possibly the most motivating, exciting and dynamic
      speaker in education today.

      But, most important, his presentations result in positive audience
      behavior change. Wong leaves his audiences with practical, useful
      techniques for how to succeed in the classroom. He has given some
      3,000 presentations to nearly a half million people in every
      American state and Canadian province and in South America, Asia,
      Africa, and Europe.

      His expertise is in classroom management and student motivation.
      Although Dr. Wong regards himself as "a plain old classroom
      teacher," record shows that he has been an excellent teacher who has
      his shared his success with thousands of teachers internationally.
      Because of his achievements, Dr. Wong has been awarded the
      Outstanding Secondary Teacher Award, Science Teacher Achievement
      Recognition Award, Outstanding Biology Teacher Award, and Valley
      Forge Teacher's Medal. He was also the subject of a story in
      Reader's Digest.

      During more than 33 years in the classroom, Herry Wong developed
      methods which resulted in his having a zero dropout rate, no
      discipline problems, a 95% homework turn in factor, and the ability
      to demonstrate master level learning by each of his students. His
      students won over 200 awards.

      Dr. Wong's presentations are of universal appeal. Business people,
      homemakers, students, and people from all walks of life will profit
      personally from his message of self motivation. As one meeting
      planner said, "In my 30 years of being in public education, I have
      never seen or heard anyone have the impact that your presentation
      has had on our teachers and administrators."


      ==

      HARRY & ROSEMARY WONG
      http://teachers.net/wong/OCT06/


      Harry and Rosemary Wong are teachers. Harry is a native of San
      Francisco and taught middle school and high school science.
      Rosemary is a native of New Orleans and taught K-8, including
      working as the school media coordinator and student activity
      director.

      Harry Wong has been awarded the Outstanding Secondary Teacher Award,
      the Science Teacher Achievement Recognition Award, the Outstanding
      Biology Teacher Award, and the Valley Forge Teacher's Medal.
      Rosemary was chosen as one of California's first mentor teachers and
      has been awarded the Silicon Valley Distinguished Woman of the Year
      Award.

      Harry Wong is the most sought after speaker in education today. He
      has been called "Mr. Practicality" for his common sense, user-
      friendly, no-cost approach to managing a classroom for high-level
      student success.

      Nearly a million teachers worldwide have heard his message. Because
      he is fully booked for two years, he has agreed to and has invited
      his wife to join him in doing a monthly column for Teachers.Net so
      that more people can hear their message.

      About Their Work... Harry and Rosemary Wong are committed to
      bringing quality and dignity to the materials they produce. For
      this, they have formed their own publishing company, of which
      Rosemary is the CEO. They have dedicated their lives to leaving a
      legacy in education and making a difference in the lives of teachers
      and students.

      Their latest contribution to helping teachers succeed is an
      eLearning course on Classroom Management.

      1. The course can be taken in private at the learner's convenience.

      2. The outcome of the course is
      a 2 inch binder with your own
      Classroom Management Action Plan.

      This Action Plan is similar to the organized and structured plan
      used by all successful teachers. Details for the classroom
      management course can be seen at www.ClassroomManagement.com.

      The Wongs have written The First Days of School, the best-selling
      book ever in education. Over 2.7 million copies have been sold.

      A third edition of The First Days of School includes an added bonus,
      an Enhanced CD featuring Harry Wong. The Enhanced CD, Never Cease to
      Learn, is dedicated to those teachers who know that the more they
      learn, the more effective they become.

      The Wongs have also produced the video series The Effective Teacher,
      winner of the Telly Award for the best educational video of the past
      twenty years and awarded the 1st place Gold Award in the
      International Film and Video Festival.

      They have released a new set of CDs with Harry Wong LIVE, speaking
      on How to Improve Student Achievement, as he speaks at one of his
      many presentations. He is the most sought after speaker in education
      and his presentations are legendary.

      When the book, video series, and CD, and eLearning course are used
      together, they form the most effective staff training tool for
      developing effective teachers. Staff developers and administrators
      who would like to know how to implement the aforementioned book,
      video series, and CD are encouraged to consult the book, New Teacher
      Induction: How to Train, Support, and Retain New Teachers.
      Information about these products can be found by visiting the
      publisher's website at www.EffectiveTeaching.com or
      www.HarryWong.com.


      ====


      'Speaking of Classroom Management' --
      An Interview with Harry K. Wong
      Article by Linda Starr
      Education World®
      http://www.education-world.com/a_issues/chat/chat008.shtml


      Meet Harry K. Wong, the author of The First Days of School: How to
      Be an Effective Teacher, and learn the secret to your success in the
      classroom!

      Harry K. Wong, a former high-school science teacher in Menlo Park,
      California, is now one of the country's leading speakers in the
      field of education.

      In spite of a heavy schedule of speaking engagements, he took the
      time to talk to Education World about The First Days of School and
      the real meaning of classroom management.

      Education World: Dr. Wong, can you tell us what inspired you to
      write The First Days of School?

      Dr. Wong: It wasn't inspiration as much as demand. I'd left teaching
      high school after 17 years and begun to travel around the country
      talking to educators about the importance of classroom management.
      Many of the teachers who attended my early in-service lectures came
      prepared to be bored. Afterward, they'd say, "Your lecture was so
      sensible and practical! I wish I'd come prepared to take notes. Do
      you have anything I can take with me?" At the time, I didn't.
      Eventually, we created videotapes of my talks, but teachers still
      asked for a book. So I decided to write one.

      EW: Both you and your wife, Rosemary Wong, have backgrounds in
      education. Did you write the book together?

      Wong: I wrote the book. My wife was the editor and designer. My wife
      feels strongly that teachers are often treated as second-class
      citizens and that little or no money is spent on providing such
      amenities as comfortable teachers' lounges or professional
      materials. She wanted to design a book that would be worthy of the
      professional educator.

      EW: Why did you decide to focus on classroom management?

      Wong: Student achievement. The bottom line is that classroom
      management has a tremendous impact on student achievement.

      EW: What's the most common mistake teachers make in classroom
      management?

      Wong: The most common mistake is that teachers don't do classroom
      management. They present lessons, and if something goes wrong, they
      discipline.

      EW: What's the difference between classroom management and
      discipline?

      Wong: Classroom management is not discipline. You manage a store.
      You don't discipline a store. You manage a team. You don't
      discipline a team. You manage a classroom. You don't discipline a
      classroom.

      EW: Can you give us a definition of classroom management?

      Wong: Classroom management is the practices and procedures that
      allow teachers to teach and students to learn.

      EW: How can teachers begin to manage their classrooms?

      Wong: The very first day, the very first minute, the very first
      second of school, teachers should begin to structure and organize
      their classrooms, to establish procedures and routines.

      EW: What are the most important procedures and routines teachers
      should establish?

      Wong: The most common management routine is to have the students
      begin work as soon as they walk into the classroom. That means an
      assignment is already posted, it's there every day, and it's in the
      same place every day.

      The second most common procedure is one teachers use to quiet the
      class. One I describe in my book is the 'Give Me Five' technique.
      The teacher says, "Give Me Five," and the students go through five
      steps:

      Eyes on speaker
      Quiet
      Be still
      Hands free
      Listen
      In five seconds, the class is quiet.
      EW: You didn't mention classroom rules. Why not?

      Wong: I talk very little about rules. A procedure is not a rule. A
      procedure is a task. Procedures reduce the need for rules and
      discipline.

      EW: You say in your book that the first few minutes of the school
      year can make or break a teacher. What do you tell teachers who
      don't establish classroom management techniques soon enough? If
      they've missed the first week or month of school, is it too late?

      Wong: I'm asked this question all the time. I tell the teachers who
      ask it to go home and ask themselves, "What one procedure can I
      establish tomorrow?" Then I tell them to work out the steps for that
      procedure. The next day, they introduce that one procedure to the
      students. They explain it, model it, and rehearse it and rehearse it
      and rehearse it. The next week they introduce another procedure --
      and so on.

      EW: Don't all those procedures and routines interfere with students'
      creativity?

      Wong: All teachers know that students learn best by doing. The only
      way a teacher can have a classroom in which kids can learn by doing,
      by discovery, by activity, is to establish routines and procedures.
      Students cannot be free to create without procedures and routines.

      EW: Do you believe the traditional advice to new teachers -- the
      advice that says, "Don't smile until Christmas?"

      Wong: I believe that all teachers are talented, that all teachers
      can be creative and loving and funny and successful -- only if the
      classroom hums with procedures and routines. A teacher cannot be
      funny or loving or creative in chaos.

      EW: Why did you choose to publish The First Days of School
      yourselves?

      Wong: We felt that most education books were drab. We wanted to lay
      this book out in a more graphically pleasing way. It was very
      important to us to give teachers as high a quality book as possible.
      We import our paper from Germany. Our books are printed by a company
      in Singapore that specializes in museum-quality books. Our binding
      is thread-sewn so the books don't fall apart with use. We wanted to
      give teachers a product that brought dignity to the profession.


      =========


      Dr. Harry K. Wong
      http://www.aeispeakers.com/speakerbio.php?SpeakerID=1094


      Harry K. Wong is possibly the most motivating, exciting and dynamic
      speaker in education today.

      But, most important, his presentations result in positive audience
      behavior change. Wong leaves his audiences with practical, useful
      techniques for how to succeed in the classroom. He has given some
      3,000 presentations to nearly a half million people in every
      American state and Canadian province and in South America, Asia,
      Africa, and Europe.

      His expertise is in classroom management and student motivation.
      Although Dr. Wong regards himself as "a plain old classroom
      teacher," record shows that he has been an excellent teacher who has
      his shared his success with thousands of teachers internationally.
      Because of his achievements, Dr. Wong has been awarded the
      Outstanding Secondary Teacher Award, Science Teacher Achievement
      Recognition Award, Outstanding Biology Teacher Award, and Valley
      Forge Teacher's Medal. He was also the subject of a story in
      Reader's Digest.

      During more than 33 years in the classroom, Herry Wong developed
      methods which resulted in his having a zero dropout rate, no
      discipline problems, a 95% homework turn in factor, and the ability
      to demonstrate master level learning by each of his students. His
      students won over 200 awards.

      Dr. Wong's presentations are of universal appeal. Business people,
      homemakers, students, and people from all walks of life will profit
      personally from his message of self motivation. As one meeting
      planner said, "In my 30 years of being in public education, I have
      never seen or heard anyone have the impact that your presentation
      has had on our teachers and administrators."


      ==========


      Harry K. Wong
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harry_K._Wong


      Dr. Harry K. Wong is an American school science teacher and
      motivational speaker. He has been in the education profession for
      over 33 years. In his speaking, he stresses the three components for
      effective teaching:

      Extremely good classroom management
      Positive expectations for student success
      Designing lessons for student mastery

      He co-authored the book The First Days of School with his wife
      Rosemary (also an educator). This book has sold over a million
      copies worldwide[citation needed]. Many school districts and
      principals use this book as a central component of their
      professional development resource package for beginning teachers

      Dr. Wong has been awarded the Outstanding Secondary Teacher Award,
      Science Teacher Achievement Recognition Award, Outstanding Biology
      Teacher Award, and Valley Forge Teacher's Medal.

      ==========

      Managing to learn: Educator finds lessons at Edwards Middle School
      by Mary Anne Gordon
      Atlanta Journal Constitution
      http://www.middleweb.com/1stDWong.html


      Harry Wong came to Edwards Middle School not to teach, but to learn.
      Wong spent several hours at Edwards last week, snapping pictures,
      talking with teachers and dropping in on classes.

      An author and sought-after staff development speaker, Wong is always
      on the lookout for how his ideas are being implemented in the
      classroom. "I assure you, I have learned more today than they have
      learned from me, " Wong said, as he walked through the halls at
      Edwards.

      Teachers at Edwards, and throughout Rockdale County, have learned
      much from Wong. All new teachers in the county receive a copy of his
      book, "The First Days of School," and teachers at Edwards have
      watched Wong's videotapes during staff development sessions.

      Wong was an educator for 30 years and now makes his living speaking
      to educators about more effective ways to manage their classrooms.
      Wong has spoken to more than 500,000 educators and often is booked
      as a speaker four to six years in advance.

      Wayne Watts, Edwards' principal, liked Wong's approach to classroom
      management and began corresponding with him. They met face-to-face
      for the first time a few months ago at a conference on Jekyll
      Island, and when Watts found out Wong would be in the Atlanta area
      for a conference, he invited Wong to his school to see some of his
      ideas. "I wanted him to see how we are taking his ideas and applying
      them to Edwards," Watts said.

      A "sponge activity" is one Wong-inspired activity used at Edwards.
      Watts said with a sponge activity, "children hit the ground
      running," with an assignment and instructions for the day already on
      the board when the students enter the classroom.

      "He gleaned the idea from other teachers and we learned about it
      from him," Watts explained. As he toured the middle school, Wong
      looked for sponge activities and other ideas of his at work. He also
      looked for new ideas that make classrooms work more efficiently,
      which Wong said is the key to teaching students.

      "Teachers say to me, 'If I could stop disciplining my students, I
      could teach.' That is not true," Wong said. "Management and
      structure make learning possible, not discipline."

      Wong also believes the students should be doing the work in the
      classroom, not the teacher. "When I see teachers doing all the work,
      I ask them why they are going to school again," he said.

      Laura Young, a teacher at Edwards, said many of Wong's ideas about
      classroom management are already being used by teachers. Hearing the
      ideas from Wong, she said, lets educators know they are doing the
      right thing.

      "When he gives tips to teachers and it is something we are already
      doing, then it validates we are on the right track," Young said.

      After Wong's tour of Edwards, 120 of the school's students performed
      as part of Wong's presentation at a conference at Spivey Hall in
      Clayton County.

      "Our students were a visual representation of the points he was
      making in his presentation," Watts said. "We were the tangible
      evidence of what he was talking about."


      ====


      SUMMARY OF MAJOR CONCEPTS COVERED BY HARRY K. WONG
      This information is from a handout distributed by Harry K. Wong at
      all of his presentations and is reprinted here with his permission.
      http://www.glavac.com/harrywong.htm


      1. The four stages of teaching: Fantasy, Survival, Mastery, Impact.

      2. The only factor that can create student achievement is a
      knowledgeable, skillful teacher.

      3. The most important factor, bar none, is the teacher. An
      inefficient teacher can affect student learning

      for years, but two successive ineffective teachers can damage a
      student forever.

      4. There is only one way to create good schools and that is with
      good teachers. We have been trying for

      years with programs and fads.

      5. Programs do not fail. They just never succeed.

      6. Teachers are hired to teach, not to facilitate a series of
      programs.

      7. People who teach programs are more concerned with the success of
      the program. People who teach

      students are more concerned with the success of the students.

      8. The three characteristics of an effective teacher: 1) has good
      classroom management skills,

      2) teaches for mastery, and 3) has positive expectations for student
      success.

      9. Your expectations of your students will greatly influence their
      achievement in your class and

      in their lives.

      10. What you do on the first day of school will determine your
      success for the rest of the year.

      11. The number one factor that leads to student achievement is
      classroom management.

      12. Have the room ready for instruction and make it invitational.

      13. Stand at the door and greet the students.

      14. Give each student a seating assignment and a seating chart.

      15. Your very first priority when class begins is to get the
      students to work.

      16. There must be an assignment posted, and in a consistent
      location, when the students enter

      the room.

      17. The number one problem in education is not discipline. It is the
      lack of procedures and routines.

      18. Most teachers spend time covering lessons and then disciplining
      when things go wrong. They never

      spend time managing their classrooms.

      19. Discipline refers to BEHAVIOR. Procedures refer to getting
      things DONE.

      20. Discipline: Has penalties and rewards. Procedures: Have NO
      penalties or rewards.

      21. Effective teachers MANAGE their classrooms. Ineffective teachers
      DISCIPLINE their classrooms.

      22. Student achievement is directly related to how the teacher
      establishes classroom procedures the very

      first week of school.

      23. The ineffective teacher begins the first day of school
      attempting to teach a subject or do a fun activity

      and spends the rest of the school year running after the students.

      24. The effective teacher spends much of the first week of school
      teaching students to follow

      classroom procedures.

      25. State your procedures and rehearse them until they become
      routines.

      26. Responsibility is the ability to respond to appropriate behavior
      or procedures.

      27. At-Risk: Students risk failure because of a lack of structure.
      Classrooms risk failure because of a

      lack of structure.

      28. All effective classrooms have structure. A series of procedures
      and routines equal structure.

      29. You can be creative, exciting, and informative when there are
      procedures and routines.

      30. Learning is much more effective when it takes place within a
      supportive community of learners.

      31. The number of people in a group must equal the number of jobs in
      a group.

      32. Cooperate with each other, compete only against yourself.

      Full details on these statements can be found in the book, The First
      Days of School, the CD set, How to Improve Student

      Achievement, or the video series, The Effective Teacher. Refer to
      www.Effective Teaching.com.


      =====

      The First Days of School: A True Tell-All Book!
      Whether you're a nervous neophyte facing your first day of school or
      a skilled veteran facing another first day of school, The First Days
      of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher, by Harry and Rosemary
      Wong, is a must read.
      To order The First Days of School: How to Be an Effective Teacher,
      by Harry and Rosemary Wong, write or call Harry K. Wong
      Publications, 943 North Shoreline Boulevard, Mountain View, CA
      94943. Phone: 650-965-7896.
      Article by Linda Starr
      Education World®
      http://www.education-world.com/a_books/books100.shtml


      "The first day of school or a class -- even the first few minutes --
      will make or break a teacher." Scary words from authors whose book,
      by their own admission, wasn't written to provide a plan or a model
      for successful teaching, but rather to help teachers formulate their
      own plans.

      But don't worry. The book provides plenty of help.

      Ever the teachers, the Wongs begin their book by teaching you how to
      use it:


      Step 1. Look at the five units, and note the book's framework. Units
      A and E provide general understanding; Units B, C, and D, specific
      techniques.

      Step 2. Read the table of contents for a quick overview of the
      chapters.

      Step 3. Thumb through the book, and note each chapter's "Key Ideas."
      Read the chapter if the ideas interest you.

      Step 4. Read the summary list of concepts at the end of each
      chapter.

      It is not, say the authors, necessary to read The First Days of
      School "from cover to cover. Browse through the book to familiarize
      yourself with its structure so that you can refer to the right parts
      when you need help." Good advice! Let's browse through the five
      units together and examine a few key ideas from each. Bear in mind
      that the book includes hundreds of practical suggestions on topics
      ranging from "How to Dress for Success" to "How to Introduce
      Yourself to Your Class." The ones mentioned here are just a few of
      my personal favorites.


      FIVE UNITS AT A GLANCE
      Unit A: Basic Understandings -- The Teacher

      (How to understand why you're teaching in the first place)

      The five chapters in Unit A are primarily concerned with how to
      become an effective teacher. "Effective teachers affect lives," say
      the Wongs, and share three essential characteristics. Effective
      teachers


      exhibit positive expectations for all students,

      establish good classroom management techniques, and

      design lessons for student mastery.
      In addition, the authors say, effective teachers use all the
      resources available to them. They use "proven research-based
      practices" and they incorporate the successful practices of other
      effective teachers into their own classrooms.

      "Here's the biggest secret to teaching success," the book
      whispers, "Beg, Borrow, and Steal!"

      Unit B: First Characteristic -- Positive Expectations
      (How to motivate and inspire your students)

      To be successful, the authors say, students must begin each school
      year with expectations of success -- expectations fostered by the
      entire educational community. "Celebrating the 'First Day of School'
      must become a tradition of all educational systems," the Wongs say.
      Some suggestions they provide for the first day of school include
      these:


      Organize a 'First Day of School' Celebration.

      Stand at the bus stop and welcome the students. (Wave and smile like
      it's Aunt Mabel who you have not seen in 14 years.)

      Stand at the entrance to the school so that no one will fail to
      receive a warm, friendly welcome.

      Bring out the school band to play at the curb or entry.

      Hang up a welcoming banner.

      Distribute a school newspaper extolling the virtues of the school
      and the wonderful spirit of the teachers and students.
      Unit C: Second Characteristic -- Classroom Management
      (How to manage a classroom that is uncontrollable)

      The ten chapters in Unit C focus on the characteristics -- and
      benefits -- of a well-managed classroom. The effective teacher, say
      the Wongs, begins the year not with an activity, but by establishing
      classroom management procedures.

      "Student achievement at the end of the year is directly related to
      the degree to which the teacher establishes good control of
      classroom procedures in the very first week of the school year,"
      they say.

      The First Days of School cites four characteristics of a well-
      managed classroom:


      Students are deeply involved with their work;

      Students know what is expected of them and are generally successful;

      There is relatively little wasted time, confusion, or disruption;
      and

      The climate of the classroom is work-oriented but relaxed and
      pleasant.
      The book also suggests specific techniques teachers can employ to
      ensure a well-managed classroom. Those include posting assignments,
      making sure students know assignments are based on objectives, and
      knowing how to praise and encourage students.

      Unit D: The Third Characteristic -- Lesson Mastery
      (How to have your students do their assignments and pass their
      tests)

      This unit is concerned with how effective teachers ensure student
      achievement. "Student success in the subject matter," say the
      authors, "will be the result of how well the teacher designs lessons
      and checks for mastery." To teach for mastery, an effective teacher
      must know how to

      design lessons in which students will learn a concept or skill and

      evaluate the learning to determine whether students have mastered
      the concept or skill.
      The key to teaching for accomplishment is using structured
      assignments with clear objectives, say the Wongs, and they provide a
      simple formula for writing those objectives:


      Step 1. Pick a verb (from Bloom's taxonomy) identifying the kind of
      thinking skill needed to achieve the objective.

      Step 2. Complete the sentence with the skill that must be performed
      or mastered.
      And keep in mind the three major characteristics of an effective
      objective:


      Structure -- a consistent format;

      Preciseness -- clear, succinct sentences; and

      Accomplishment -- a statement of what is to be achieved.
      Unit E: Future Understandings -- The Professional
      (How to cope with the years still ahead of you and retire with
      dignity)

      Unit E emphasizes the personal benefits of becoming an effective
      teacher and explains the difference between a teacher and a
      professional educator. "A professional," the Wongs say, "is defined
      not by the business a person is in, but by the way a person does
      business." A professional educator, they note, says, "What do I need
      to know in order to do what I need to do?"

      Once again, the Wongs' advice is based on specific techniques,
      rather than educational buzzwords. To be a professional educator,
      they say, teachers must "constantly learn and grow." They can do
      this by


      joining or organizing professional support groups,

      listening to others,

      reading professional literature,

      observing other effective teachers,

      participating in professional conferences, and

      using proven research.

      THE FINAL ASSESSMENT
      The First Days of School isn't a book of activities, lesson plans,
      formulas, or pneumonic devices you can teach. It's a book of
      procedures and techniques that will help you ensure that your
      students get the most from your teaching. It isn't a book filled
      with abstract educational theory. It's filled with practical
      suggestions for achieving what you're striving for. It isn't a book
      about how students learn. It's a book about how -- and why --
      effective teachers teach.

      Moreover, it's a book that is easy to read -- and browse. The layout
      is clean and user-friendly. The type size and abundance of white
      space make it easy on the eyes. The photographs, illustrations, and
      variety of type styles highlight important ideas and concepts. And
      like a Joke-of-the-Day calendar, you can pick it up anytime and find
      another gem of an idea.

      On the title page of The First Days of School, the Wongs say, "Some
      people go into teaching because it is a job. Some people go into
      teaching to make a difference." This book is clearly for the teacher
      who wants to make a difference!


      MY FAVORITE QUOTES FROM THE WONGS
      "The most important day of a person's education is the first day of
      school, not Graduation Day."

      "Teaching is a craft, a highly skilled craft, that can be learned."

      "Education should be challenging, exciting, engrossing, and thought-
      provoking, but not fun. If you believe that learning should be fun,
      you are doing the students a disservice. School is where you go to
      learn skills that help make you a productive citizen and grow to
      your fullest potential as a human being."

      "The more the school and the family are joined as partners in
      educating young people, the greater the child's chance for success."

      "A well-managed classroom is a task-oriented and predictable
      environment."

      "If a student cannot demonstrate learning or achievement, the
      student has not failed -- we have failed."

      =====

      BE AS EFFECTIVE AS YOU CAN BE....
      By Larry Flammer
      Harry and Rosemary Wong: The First Days of School, 1998 Harry K.
      Wong Publications, Inc.
      650-965-7896 (Mountain View, CA) http://www.effectiveteaching.com
      http://www.indiana.edu/~ensiweb/wong.html


      As an educator, your goal should NOT be teaching people to just KNOW
      what they do not know (contrary to the popular notion). Your goal
      should be that your students will BEHAVE differently, reflecting the
      greater accuracy of information acquired, and better ways of
      evaluating and interpreting that information. Knowing and
      understanding facts and concepts of science (or any other subject)
      is most likely to be very superficial and short-lived, unless this
      information somehow becomes sufficiently integrated that it
      influences attitudes and behavior. Any lesser goal is a waste of
      everyone's energy.

      One of the most common barriers to making such changes in behavior
      is the collection of misconceptions that we all accumulate
      throughout childhood. It is much harder to unlearn old ideas than to
      learn new ones, but the unlearning is critical if there is to be any
      behavioral change. These misconceptions can be as simple as our
      perception of what science is, or as complex as our understanding of
      natural selection. But if they are not addressed, they can adversely
      influence how we perceive all subsequent material, our attitudes
      about the subject, and our resulting behavior in any relevant
      context.

      A misconception, as used here, is any knowledge or understanding
      about the natural world which is inconsistent with the latest
      consensus based on critical and objective analysis by experts who
      have thoroughly studied the subject. It is assumed that such
      knowledge reflects the closest approximation of reality that we have
      achieved to date, but the real test of the validity of our knowledge
      about the real world is our experience in seeing that it
      consistently works! However, since new tools and techniques are
      constantly being developed, our knowledge base and its
      interpretations are always subject to change. The dual challenge to
      any teacher is to be as current as possible in the content material
      to be taught, and to use effective strategies for dealing with
      existing misconceptions.

      As suggested above, divesting oneself of long-held comfortable
      notions is not easy. This is one of the most difficult things for a
      person to do, to deny a lifetime of accumulated assumptions, and
      acquire a set of new, more realistic perceptions. This is especially
      challenging when those misconceptions are entwined with the
      religious, philosophical or political beliefs of that person and
      his/her family and friends, a context which must be recognized and
      respected.

      As a biology teacher, you will want to help your students to
      recognize their misconceptions for what they are, and to replace
      them with perceptions that work better as they interact with the
      natural world. For example, in order to make sense out of the
      growing body of biological knowledge, students must recognize how
      science works, what evolution is, and how evolution effectively
      makes sense of virtually all aspects of life. As a result, student
      behavior and attitudes should change in ways which reflect their new-
      found realization of the role of evolution in dealing with medical
      treatments, environmental problems, personal relationships,
      political action regarding these issues, and the many other ways a
      valid understanding of evolution and the nature of science relates
      to practical matters.

      One of the many reasons we all develop misconceptions about the
      natural world is that we are surrounded by natural
      illusions... "Perception is not always reality!" Consequently, one
      fairly obvious way to raise consciousness about such misconceptions
      is to arrange for your students to experience some of those natural
      illusions, and then experience some of the evidence that reveals
      their illusory nature (see some of our suggestions for doing this,
      under "The First Days").

      However, if you are to be an effective teacher (of any subject or
      grade level), a teacher who truly affects lives, there are some
      basic elements that are needed to achieve this goal. It is very
      clear that students are most likely to want to learn and change
      their behavior if they truly admire and care for the teacher, and
      enjoy being in that teacher's classroom. So a primary goal for the
      teacher is to create the classroom environment which engenders that
      respect and affection by the student. Part of that process involves
      the teacher's clear respect and genuine concern for his/her
      students, as important human beings whose health, happiness and
      success in life can benefit from the content of the course. Another
      part of the process includes a teacher's clear, passionate
      enthusiasm and knowledge for the subject.

      The most important single element to accomplish all of this is
      timing. There is only ONE first day of class for every student in
      your class. What you do and don't do that first day, and to a lesser
      extent the next several days, will determine the degree of your
      success (and the success of your students in your class) for the
      rest of the year. What happens that first day of school will set the
      tone for the entire year. Each day following is increasingly harder
      to change that tone. So those first few days are critical,
      especially those first few minutes of the first day. There are
      strategies that will create a class which your students will WANT to
      attend, will actually look forward to getting there, every day,
      early, will WANT to learn and WANT to please.

      What are those strategies? WHERE are those strategies? Look no
      further. If you've ever had the pleasure and good fortune of
      participating in a workshop, in-service, or inspirational year-
      opening send-off with Dr. and Mrs. Harry Wong, you know what I mean.
      If you've NEVER had that pleasure, you can still experience some of
      the dynamics of their style, and the richness of their content in a
      book they have recently published: The First Days of School. You
      will find there is no "one way" or magic formula, and there are many
      techniques from which to choose. Great teachers teach differently,
      but these strategies can be adapted to any teaching style, at any
      grade level and for any subject area. They are supported by
      educational research. They CAN be learned. They DO WORK. This book
      can make the difference between a "teaching job" and an exciting,
      rewarding, professional teaching career. It is safe to say that no
      other tool in your teaching toolkit will be as valuable.

      So, NO MATTER WHAT LESSONS OR TEXT YOU CHOOSE TO USE, NO MATTER HOW
      YOU PRESENT THEM, BE AS EFFECTIVE AS YOU CAN BE. Whether you are an
      experienced teacher, or especially if you are a beginning teacher,
      the Wong book can help you to be as effective as you can be. Your
      students will succeed, you will succeed, and you will be admired by
      your colleagues and students alike.

      I had the good fortune to begin my teaching career (in 1959) in the
      region where Harry Wong was becoming a respected and well-known
      teacher, already early in his career. He simply pulled a lot of
      these strategies together into a growing package, and began sharing
      them with colleagues. One Summer, in the early 1960s, he presented a
      workshop at nearby Stanford University, and I participated in that
      experience. There was no book. But the ideas, skills, and attitudes
      I carried from that workshop have made my 38 year career the joy
      that it was. Harry went on to international acclaim, sharing
      his "package" at teacher institutes and in-service workshops all
      over the world. I'm so happy that he and his lovely teacher/wife
      Rosemary have produced (and published) their collection of teaching
      strategies and tools, so they are available to all teachers
      everywhere. Furthermore, you can find out more about their book and
      other productions on their website. It's never too early to start
      planning for next year's first school day (a chance to start afresh,
      one of the hidden benefits of teaching!)

      DO IT.....NOW!!! Be ready for September!!

      ======

      Harry Wong Addresses National Conference
      Gary Hopkins
      Education World® Editor-in-Chief
      http://www.education-world.com/a_curr/curr289.shtml


      Education World is at the National Middle School Association
      convention, being held through Saturday in St. Louis. On Thursday
      night, Harry K. Wong addressed a general session of the conference.
      In his keynote address, Wong made a case for the importance of good
      classroom management as a key to student achievement.
      ST. LOUIS (November 2) -- Noted educator Harry K. Wong, author of
      The First Days of School, praised the efforts of middle level
      educators in attendance at a general session of the National Middle
      School Association conference being held through Saturday in St.
      Louis. Wong recalled his brief experiences as a middle school
      classroom teacher and expressed admiration for teachers who teach
      students he referred to as "hormones on feet."

      Wong cited a number of studies to support his contention that
      teachers -- not instructional fads or programs -- are the keys to
      student achievement in middle school. Good teachers who possess
      strong classroom management skills, design lessons that help
      students achieve mastery, and have positive expectations of student
      achievement are the essential ingredients to achievement, Wong told
      more than 4,000 educators.

      Wong, an expert in classroom management -- his The First Days of
      School has sold more than 1.25 million copies -- made the case for
      establishing classroom routines and procedures that ensure that
      students know what is expected of them. Those routines and
      procedures need to be set in place from the very first day of the
      school year, Wong told the educators. "You botch up the first day,
      and you're dead meat the rest of the year," said Wong, adding
      that "students just want some consistency."

      Teachers who greet students each morning with "bell work,"
      activities that students sit down to do as soon as they enter the
      classroom, are establishing a consistent procedure that will pay big
      dividends when it comes to achievement. "The number one problem in
      our schools is not discipline; it's a lack of procedures," added
      Wong. "Effective teachers manage their classrooms with procedures
      and routines. Ineffective teachers manage their classrooms with
      threats and punishments.

      "Effective teachers can be defined with a single word," Wong told
      the convention crowd. "Effective teachers steal!" Teachers who beg,
      borrow, and steal good techniques are teachers whose students will
      achieve, he added, noting that he is "the biggest burglar in the
      education field"!

      Wong proposed that school systems promote effective teaching and
      student achievement by providing new teachers -- teachers in their
      first and second years in the classroom -- with structured training
      programs that teach good classroom management skills. Mentoring
      programs can be good, he added, but they cannot replace
      comprehensive training programs. Would you rather travel in an
      airplane with a pilot who had undergone a consistent and rigorous
      training program or with one who might need to call on a mentor if a
      sticky situation presents itself? Wong asked.

      ============

      Effective Teaching...
      by Harry and Rosemary Wong

      October 2006

      Assessing Student Progress with a Rubric


      ---------------------------------------------------------------------
      -----------

      EFFECTIVE TEACHING
      Assessing Student Progress with a Rubic
      Harry and Rosemary Wong
      http://teachers.net/wong/OCT06/


      Colette Cornatzer, a student in Norm Dannen's class at Southern
      Regional High School in Manahawkin, New Jersey, says, "A rubric is a
      scale that teachers may use to grade an article of writing from
      their students. Because the student knows the stipulations of the
      rubric, the student knows how to write the paper. I like rubrics
      because they make the student aware of exactly how to answer the
      questions or write the assigned article, and it plots a very fair
      and easy–to-understand grading system. A rubric creates a backbone
      for your paper."

      We began the story of Norm Dannen in our May 2006 column, "Hitting
      the Bulls Eye as a Beginning Teacher."

      In that column, we focused on how Norm Dannen used objectives to
      communicate to his students what they are to learn. In this column,
      we will share with you how Norm Dannen assesses and tests his
      students on that learning.

      Students get more done when they see where they are going and what
      they are doing.

      Just think what would happen to student learning if the students knew
      what they were to learn and thus knew they could not fail.

      To do this, effective teachers have objectives for each lesson.
      These objectives govern what the students are to learn and what the
      teacher, concomitantly, is to teach.

      Objectives are classroom learning targets. The students know what
      they are aiming for, thus, they know what they are responsible for
      learning.

      Thus, when both the student and teacher are moving towards the same
      goal, that's when learning takes place.

      Telling a student to read a chapter, story, or book involves no
      learning, because the student does not know what he or she is to
      accomplish by the reading. The teacher, likewise, does not know
      what he or she is to teach; the teacher is merely filling time and
      covering the material.

      The students must be given a set of objectives at the beginning
      of their assignment telling them what they
      are responsible for accomplishing.
      (The First Days of School, p. 229)

      Assessment for Learning

      Students like to have lesson objectives because it tells them what
      they are to learn. They also like objectives because they know how
      they will be evaluated, because the test is aligned to the
      objectives.

      Thus, effective teachers give their students a scoring guide that
      spells out how they can earn points or a grade for accomplishing a
      lesson. A scoring guide helps a student to determine what is
      expected of an assignment.

      Sometimes these scoring guides are called scoring rubrics or just
      plain rubric.

      Don't worry if you do not know what a rubric is, even though you
      hear it bantered around in educational circles. Don't bother
      looking it up in the dictionary either as the dictionary's
      definition has nothing to do with what educators call a rubric. The
      word was coined in 2001 by a group called the Assessment Reform
      Group in England, but that does not make it correct.

      Some educators delight in picking up words and making a cottage
      industry out of them, never realizing that the educator in the
      trench has no clue as to the invented word.

      What's interesting is that if you go to the Assessment Reform
      Group's web site, you never see the word "rubric" used. Rather, the
      group advocates "Assessment for Learning," which they define as the
      process of seeking and interpreting evidence for use by learners and
      their teachers to decide where the learners are in their learning,
      where they need to go, and how best to get there.

      To help students reach the highest possible level of achievement, the
      effective teacher is constantly assessing for student learning
      to help students go where they need to go and help them to best get
      there.

      This is done by assessing student work and comparing it with the
      scoring guide or rubric.

      Give the Students a Scoring Guide

      There is no need to confuse the students with jargon. At the
      beginning of a lesson, give the students a scoring guide and call it
      a "scoring guide." A scoring guide is a clear, simple,
      understandable term as it tells the students what is expected of
      them and how they can earn a score.

      But, amongst us educators, let's agree that a scoring guide, a
      scoring rubric, and a rubric are all the same and move on.

      Look at a rubric in the same way as scoring guides that are used in
      gymnastics and ice skating. The judges are not grading the
      contestants. Rather, they have a predetermined guide that governs
      how points are earned when skaters complete certain spins, jumps,
      turns, and steps. The skaters know the scoring format and practice
      and practice to improve their scoring.

      Helping Students Make Progress to Improve

      If you wonder how ice skaters perfect their jumps and spins, there
      is a system of cables and pulleys installed in the ice rink. The
      cable is attached to the ice skater with a harness (with butt buds
      and crash pads to cushion the falls).

      The coach pulls the cable to control the lifts while assessing and
      teaching at the same time—over and over again, working towards
      PROGESS and ACCOMPLISHMENT.

      Likewise, when the students are given a scoring guide or rubric
      ahead of time, they can see how they will be scored and can earn
      better scores by doing better work. All the while, the teacher is
      involved in helping the student progress and improve his or her
      score.

      The role of a teacher is not to grade a student. The teacher's main
      role is to help every student reach the highest possible level of
      achievement.
      (The First Days of School, p. 237)

      The purpose of giving a student a test is not necessarily to grade a
      student. The purpose of a test should be to assess what the student
      has learned so that further learning can be planned.

      And that's the purpose of education, to make sure the student is
      making progress toward some predetermined learning goal.

      For instance, when a doctor runs a test on you, such as a blood
      test, a blood pressure test, a mammogram, or a colonoscopy (ouch),
      the purpose is not to grade you. Rather, the doctor assesses the
      results of the test so that he or she can prescribe the proper
      medicine or treatment to progress toward the goal of enhancing your
      health.

      And, should you ever visit a family member or friend in a hospital,
      you may ask the doctor how the patient is doing. What you want to
      hear is, "The patient is making progress."

      Similarly, that's the purpose of education, to make sure the student
      is making progress.

      To do this, there must be constant assessment for learning.

      The Great Gatsby

      In our May 2006 column we shared how Norm Dannen created a lesson to
      teach the New Jersey reading standard:

      All students will understand and apply the knowledge of sounds,
      letters, and words in written English to become independent and
      fluent readers, and will read a variety of materials and texts with
      fluency and comprehension.

      He created a lesson to teach this standard using the novel, The
      Great Gatsby.

      The Great Gatsby was published in 1925 and is regarded as one of the
      foremost pieces of American literature. It was written by F. Scott
      Fitzgerald, or Francis Scott Key Fitzgerald—yes—a direct descendent
      of the Francis Scott Key who wrote The Star-Spangled Banner.

      The setting of the book was a period in America called the Roaring
      Twenties, a period of great wealth. The theme of the book is how
      unbridled materialism was threatening to destroy the great American
      dream. Sound familiar today?

      The novel centers on a man, Jay Gatsby, his friend, and his
      girlfriend, Daisy Buchanan.

      In 1974 Hollywood made a movie of the novel and Robert Redford
      played Jay Gatsby and Mia Farrow played Daisy Buchanan.

      The Great Gatsby Rubric

      At the end of the lesson, Norm used a scoring guide or rubric to
      assess his students for their learning.

      You might want to print off our May 2006 column and have it readily
      available as we explain his rubric.

      Note that the rubric or scoring guide consists of a series of
      columns and rows, yes, like a spreadsheet.

      The rows each represent a characteristic, such as reading, compare
      and contrast, and research/resource skills.

      The columns are each headed with a point value that the students can
      earn, such as 4, 3, 2, 1, and 0 or NS (no score).

      Each box represents the intersection of a characteristic and a point
      value, just as you would have two points meet on a graph.

      Look at the first box after "reading" and under "4" and follow along
      under 3, 2, 1, and 0.

      4 The student can earn four points by easily relating Fitzgerald's
      idea of "The American Dream" to Jay Gatsby's actions and give three
      specific written or verbal examples.

      3 The student can earn three points by relating Fitzgerald's idea
      of "The American Dream" to Jay Gatsby's actions and give two
      specific written or verbal examples.

      2 The student can earn two points by relating Fitzgerald's idea
      of "The American Dream" to Jay Gatsby's actions, but has trouble
      giving written or verbal examples.

      1 The student can earn one point but has trouble relating
      Fitzgerald's idea of "The American Dream" to Jay Gatsby's actions
      and cannot give any examples.

      0 The student earns no points by being unable to relate Fitzgerald's
      idea of "The American Dream" to Jay Gatsby's actions or give any
      examples of same.


      Engaging Students

      Just as the word, "rubric" is bantered around today, the other
      currently fashionable word is "engaged." Thirty years ago the same
      term was "relevance." That is, make the lesson related to the
      student's own life.

      Thus, students learn best when they can make connections between the
      lesson and their interest and life experiences. That's how
      we "engage" students.

      Norm engages his students by asking them to compare their life today
      to the life of the people who lived during the time of Jay Gatsby,
      in the 1920s.

      To do this, Norm began with the following objective:

      Draw parallels between their own lives in the context of the Jazz
      Age, the Lost Generation, Prohibition, and the Great Depression.

      You can use a rubric in your classroom as a formative or a summative
      instrument. For a complete explanation of these two terms, please
      read pages 240 to 242 in The First Days of School.

      Very simply, formative tells you what the student IS learning and
      summative tells you what the student HAS learned.

      Helping a Student Who Does Not Score Well

      Using The Great Gatsby rubric as a formative instrument, let's say
      you have a student who earns a zero. That is, the student cannot
      relate his or her life to the lives of the people who lived in the
      1920s.

      This does not mean the student is dumb, lazy, or failing. It just
      means the student cannot see the relationship of life today and life
      that existed over 80 years ago. Maybe your great Aunt Mabel can,
      but that can be difficult for a young person who is 15 years old and
      hasn't even figured out life today.

      So, that's what makes life challenging and exciting for teachers.

      To illustrate, we (Harry and Rosemary) went to an Off-Broadway show
      in New York City of Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in
      Paris. You see, most of you can't relate already.

      Jacques Brel was a Belgian song writer and troubadour who wrote
      about life in Belgium and France of his time, the 1940s to 1960s.
      He sang his own songs and was quite popular in New York's Greenwich
      Village where he sang until the mid-1960s.

      The show, Jacques Brel Is Alive and Well and Living in Paris,
      consists of 34 songs, no dialogue (no explanation), and sung one
      after another by a cast of four people.

      Sitting very close to us was a young lady easily in her early 20s.
      At the end of the show, we overheard her say to one of the cast
      members, "I don't get it." Does she get a zero or an "F" on the
      rubric? Not really, if you are using the rubric as a formative
      instrument.

      It's very possible that this young lady had no context of life in
      the 1940s to 1960s in Europe. If so, this would make it difficult
      for her to relate her life of today to the life of the people who
      lived over 50 years ago in Belgium and France.

      We wanted to get a hold of her and do our teacher thing on her and
      say, "Young lady, please sit down. Let's take one of Jacques Brel's
      songs and read it line by line for meaning,"—just as you would do
      with Shakespeare.

      In time she would say, "Oh, I see what he was talking about." We
      would then say, "Now, name or describe something that is happening
      in your life today that is similar to what was happening to the
      people who lived during the 1940s to 1960s."

      To help a student see what life was like in America in the 1920s, go
      to the Library of Congress web site, www.loc.gov. There are over 10
      million digital images that you can download showing life in the
      1920s, such as pictures of the great jazz singers.

      With an approach of assessment for learning, we can help students
      who have scored NS/0 on the scoring guide to score higher and make
      progress.

      Our Role as Teachers

      Our major role as teachers is to help students to learn the subject
      of the lesson or the course we are teaching.

      Objectives are classroom learning targets. The students know what
      they are aiming for, thus, they know what they are responsible for
      learning.

      The students must be given a set of objectives at the beginning of
      their assignment telling them what they are responsible for
      accomplishing.

      Students like to have lesson objectives because it tells them what
      they are to learn. They also like objectives because they know how
      they will be evaluated, because the test is aligned to the
      objectives.

      The purpose of giving a student a test is not necessarily to grade a
      student. The purpose of a test should be to assess what the student
      has learned so that further learning can be planned.

      It's as Simple as 1-2-3

      The May teachers.net column focused on how Norm Dannen uses
      objectives to communicate to his students WHAT they are to learn.
      This column focuses on HOW he assesses for the WHAT.

      Unless you know where you are going, you will never hit the bull's
      eye with your students.

      As you develop your lessons for the year, always ask WHAT and HOW.
      But don't stop there. The most important part of the entire process
      is sharing the WHAT and HOW with your students. Education is not
      trickery and clever tactics to stump students. Our goal is to open
      the wonderment of the world and help students discover the joy and
      fulfillment associated with learning.

      Learning is a definable process and one that all students can
      experience. It is our charge to articulate that process to students
      in very concrete terms.

      Look at the lesson you are going to deliver tomorrow and ask
      yourself these three questions:

      Do the students know WHAT they are to learn as a result of
      experiencing the lesson?

      Do you know HOW you are going to help the students accomplish the
      goal of the lesson?

      Do the students know HOW you are going to assess their learning of
      the lesson?

      If you cannot clearly answer these questions, you are not ready to
      teach your lesson. You will only frustrate the students as well as
      yourself in trying to figure out what went wrong.

      The tone of your classroom will change when the students see that
      you are there to help them progress through the year. Parents can
      see the direction and accomplishment of their children as well.

      Hitting the bull's eye is not difficult, but it does require skill
      and dedication to clearly understanding the WHATs and HOWs of
      learning and communicating that to your students. The more practice
      you get at the skill, the greater your precision will be in
      delivering a lesson to your students that is right on target.

      Start practicing the process and become a Grand Master Archer. Your
      students will be the ultimate winners!

      =====================

      Harry Wong states that what you do on the first few days of school
      can determine your success for the rest of the year.
      http://www.msdpt.k12.in.us/TLA/TLA%20building%20block%20A.htm
      http://www.msdpt.k12.in.us/TLA/tla%20wong%20topics.htm

      The Effective Teacher

      1. Exhibits positive expectations for all students

      --Having positive expectations simply means that the
      teacher believes in the learner and that the learner can
      learn. (See also building block B)


      2. Establishes good classroom management techniques

      --Classroom Management is practices and procedures that a
      teacher uses to maintain an environment in which instruction and
      learning can occur. (See also building block C)


      3. Designs lessons for student mastery

      --Student's demonstration that a concept or skill can be
      performed at a level of proficiency determined by the teacher. (See
      also building block D)

      --Student success in the subject matter of the class will be the
      result of how well the teacher designs lessons and checks for mastery


      Ideas for you to implement for the first week of school:

      Ø Associate with and learn from positive mentors…avoid teachers
      that make negative comments, complain and make excuses.

      Ø Find a mentor who is supportive.

      Ø Work in a collegial manner with all your colleagues.

      Ø Beg, borrow, and steal!

      Ø Join a professional organization.

      Ø Subscribe to a professional publication, or join a listserv on
      the Internet.

      Ø Do your job with the same enthusiasm that you expect from your
      own students.

      Ø As an employee of the district, you should expect to be
      reassigned from time to time.

      Ø If you are a beginning teacher, if you are an experienced
      teacher, listen, listen, and listen.
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