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[AGRICULTURE] Lue Gim Gong - "The Citress Expert" (Lue Gim Gong Orange)

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  • madchinaman
    Lue Gim Gong horticulturist Born: 1860 Birthplace: Canton, China http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0921313.html http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0921313.html Lue
    Message 1 of 1 , Jul 2, 2005
      Lue Gim Gong
      horticulturist
      Born: 1860
      Birthplace: Canton, China
      http://www.infoplease.com/ipa/A0921313.html
      http://www.factmonster.com/ipka/A0921313.html


      Lue Gim Gong emigrated from China to San Francisco as a boy of 12.
      When he was 16 he moved to Massachusetts, where he took a job in a
      shoe factory. There he befriended Fannie Burlingame, a Sunday school
      teacher who taught the Chinese workers at the shoe factory. He moved
      in with the wealthy Burlingame family, tended their greenhouse,
      converted to Christianity, and gained his U.S. citizenship.

      In 1885, Lue moved to Deland, Florida, where Fannie and her sister
      had bought land, and began to work in the orange groves. There he
      developed the extraordinary horticultural contributions that would
      earn him the title "citrus wizard." The most famous of his creations
      was the "Lue Gim Gong orange." These oranges would mature in August
      or September, ensuring that the fruit would not freeze and be
      ruined. It was an enormous advance for the citrus industry. In 1911,
      he was awarded the Silver Wilder Medal by the American Homological
      Society, the first time an award was given for a citrus product. He
      also developed a grapefruit that grew individually on the tree
      rather than in clusters, a strongly scented grapefruit, and a
      rosebush that produced seven varieties of roses.

      Died: 1925


      =


      Lue Gim Gong, 1859-1925
      http://www.firn.edu/civiced/games/faces/gong.html


      Father of Florida's Citrus Industry
      When the Spanish came to Florida after 1513, they brought citrus
      trees with them. Citrus trees grew in Florida, but they gave oranges
      which were unlike the delicious fruit which we enjoy today. These
      early trees produced a small, sour orange. But the development of
      oranges and other citrus more adapted to Florida's environment, came
      from the work of a farmer-scientist who was born in 1859 in a
      farming village near Canton, China.

      Lue Gim Gong lived in China on a farm until he was 12 years old.
      Then, he came to America with his uncle. They lived briefly in San
      Francisco, California, where many Chinese-Americans had settled. But
      the uncle took him to Massachusetts in New England. In the cold
      winters of Massachusetts, he learned English, went to school, and
      learned about American customs.

      Unfortunately, at age 26, he became ill with a lung disease
      (tuberculosis). He came to Florida in 1886 to enjoy the sunshine and
      to recover from his illness. Settling in DeLand, Lue Gim Gong began
      citrus farming. He worked on improving the varieties of orange trees
      and grapefruit trees which grew there. He wanted an orange that was
      able to endure cold weather and which was bright and sweet. In 1888,
      he developed such an orange. It is still called the Lue Gim Gong
      orange -- and is grown in Florida today. Four years later, Lue
      developed a new variety of grapefruit.

      In 1911, Lue Gim Gong was given a medal by the United States
      government for his contributions in citrus farming. He was famous
      for his clever work to improve one of Florida's main industries --
      the citrus industry.


      =

      http://www.delandhouse.com/gazebo.htm
      A gazebo containing the bust of Lue Gim Gong was erected on site of
      the DeLand House to honor "The Citrus Wizard." Often called
      the "Luther Burbank of Citrus," Lue Gim Gong was an early pioneer in
      developing many varieties of grapefruit and oranges that won him
      many honors. Some of the citrus grown today can trace their
      characteristics back to his experimentation and horticultural skills.


      =


      LIFE OF LUE GIM GONG
      http://www.delandhouse.com/gazeboLIF.htm


      Lue Gim Gong was born in 1860 in Canton, China, where his parents
      were farmers. In 1872 his uncle came from San Francisco to visit the
      family and suggested Lue come to the United States.

      Just a lad of 12, he sailed to San Francisco with several older
      boys. He worked his way across the country to North Adams,
      Massachusetts, where he found employment at the C.T. Sampson shoe
      factory (Mr. Sampson was a donor to Stetson University and Sampson
      Hall is named in his honor).

      Miss Fannie Burlingame, daughter of a prosperous farmer and
      merchant, met Lue at her Sunday school class. He was very frail and
      when he became ill (probably tuberculosis), Miss Fanny took him into
      her home and nursed him back to health. Under her care, he became a
      Christian and a citizen of the United States.

      Lue longed to see his mother and, in 1884, he returned to China but
      after a short visit he returned to his country.

      The winters in Massachusetts were too harsh for Lue and, in 1886, he
      moved with Miss Fanny to DeLand where she had property next to her
      sister, Cynthia, and Cynthia's husband, William Dumville.

      For several years Lue and Mr. Dumville planted orange trees and
      other fruits. In December of 1894 and February of 1895, Florida
      suffered the worst freezes in recorded history. Ninety-five percent
      of the citrus groves in Florida were lost, including Lue's grove.
      Mr. Dumville died about this time, also, and his wife returned
      permanently to North Adams. Lue continued his work alone. Mother
      Fannie, as Lue called her, returned regularly to the North but she
      always watched over Lue until she died in 1903. Fannie and her
      sister left Lue the property in DeLand and $10,000 but, still, her
      death devastated him for now he had no one to take care of him.

      Lue's only companions now were a rooster and his two horses, "Baby"
      and "Fannie." He broke his hip in an accident and walked with a
      crutch for the remainder of his life. Nevertheless, he spent all his
      time experimenting and developing his groves.

      In 1911, as one of his outstanding accomplishments, he cross-
      pollinated a "Hart's Late" with a "Mediterranean Sweet" and produced
      a new orange, the "Lue Gim Gong" which ripened in early fall and was
      more resistant to cold. It was propagated by Mr. George Tabor of the
      Glen St. Mary's Nursery. As a result the nursery received a Silver
      Wilder Medal from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the first time
      such an award was made for citrus.

      Lue also developed a grapefruit that grew singly on the branch
      rather than in a clump, an aromatic grapefruit that had little juice
      but smelled wonderful. He also propagated roses and other flowers
      and fruits. He claimed to have a cure for skin cancer.

      Lue was not adept at business and friends had to pay his taxes to
      keep him from losing his property. He was a devout Christian,
      however, and many people attended the prayer services he held on
      Sundays in a little gazebo behind his home.

      Lue Gim Gong died in 1925 and was buried in Oakdale Cemetery. The
      people of DeLand who knew of his work and were so impressed by it
      planned to erect a bust in his memory but the depression began and
      the project was forgotten. It has taken seventy-four years to
      fittingly honor Lue, "The Citrus Wizard."

      Lue lived by a proverb we all should adopt:

      "NO ONE SHOULD LIVE IN THIS WORLD FOR HIMSELF ALONE, BUT TO DO GOOD
      FOR THOSE WHO COME AFTER HIM."


      =======


      Lue Gim Gong
      http://famous.adoption.com/famous/lue-gim-gong.html


      Lue was born into a wealthy farming family in Canton. An uncle who
      had already emigrated to the USA returned with stories of the great
      opportunities there, and at the age of 12 Lue prevailed on his
      parents to let him emigrate, alone. After a few years in San
      Francisco he headed east to become a strike-breaker at a shoe
      factory, and there he met the wealthy Burlingame family, whose
      greenhouse gardener he became.

      He converted to Christianity and was naturalized in 1877, before
      tuberculosis forced him to return to China. But he could not
      reintegrate there and returned to America in 1885, this time to
      Florida, where he began work in orange groves owned by the
      Burlingame family near DeLand. In 1903 he inherited part of their
      fortune, but he had no business sense and several times was in
      financial difficulties. (After he died it was discovered that he had
      been so naïve that he didn't know what a check was: a trunk full of
      uncashed checks was found in his room, explaining why he was always
      so short of money.)

      Lue's lasting importance lies in his skill as a citrus breeder,
      leading to his nickname, the Luther Burbank of Florida. He developed
      several important new crosses of oranges and grapefruit which
      revolutionized the industry. In 1911 he won the Wilder Silver Medal
      of the American Pomological Society for his oranges. He also
      produced important new apple and raspberry varieties.

      ===============


      http://encycl.opentopia.com/term/Lue_Gim_Gong
      Born in 1859 to a family of Chinese farmers, Lue Gim Gong [link], 呂金
      功, pinyin: Lǚ Jīngōng, was interested in America and the
      opportunities that lay over the Pacific Ocean. After his uncle
      returned from America when Lue was 12, Lue pleaded with his parents
      to let him go with his uncle to America. His parents agreed, giving
      him a bolt of silk to sell when he arrived. He lived in a heavily
      Chinese populated area in San Francisco until the age 16 when he
      moved to North Adams, Massachusetts to work at a shoe factory. At
      this factory, Lue met Fannie Burlingame, his Sunday School teacher,
      who was able to speak both English and Lue's native Chinese. When
      she learned of his skill with plants, she asked him to live with the
      Burlingame's to tend their greenhouse. She converted him to
      Christianity, and helped him become an American citizen in 1877.

      Lue had been advised to move to a warmer climate due to his recent
      contraction of tuberculosis. Due to his conversion, he was unable to
      return to China. Fannie recommended a relocation to DeLand, Florida,
      where she and her sister owned land. Lue agreed, and in 1885, he was
      working once again, this time in orange groves. Lue noticed that the
      oranges currently in use were very susceptible to cold weather.
      After experimenting, he finally developed an orange in 1888 that was
      both sweet and was hardy to cold weather. The "Lue Gim Gong Orange"
      is still grown in Florida today.

      In 1911, Lue was given the Silver Wilder Medal by the American
      Pomological Society for his orange. Lue died on June 3, 1925, in
      DeLand.


      ==========


      http://lue-gim-gong.biography.ms/
      Born in 1859 to a family of Chinese farmers, Lue Gim Gong [1], 呂金
      功, pinyin: Lǚ Jīngōng, was interested in America and the
      opportunities that lay over the Pacific Ocean. After his uncle
      returned from America when Lue was 12, Lue pleaded with his parents
      to let him go with his uncle to America. His parents agreed, giving
      him a bolt of silk to sell when he arrived. He lived in a heavily
      Chinese populated area in San Francisco until the age 16 when he
      moved to North Adams, Massachusetts to work at a shoe factory. At
      this factory, Lue met Fannie Burlingame , his Sunday School teacher,
      who was able to speak both English and Lue's native Chinese. When
      she learned of his skill with plants, she asked him to live with the
      Burlingame's to tend their greenhouse. She converted him to
      Christianity, and helped him become an American citizen in 1877.

      Lue had been advised to move to a warmer climate due to his recent
      contraction of tuberculosis. Due to his conversion, he was unable to
      return to China. Fannie recommended a relocation to DeLand, Florida,
      where she and her sister owned land. Lue agreed, and in 1885, he was
      working once again, this time in orange groves. Lue noticed that the
      oranges currently in use were very susceptible to cold weather.
      After experimenting, he finally developed an orange in 1888 that was
      both sweet and was hardy to cold weather. The "Lue Gim Gong Orange"
      is still grown in Florida today.

      In 1911, Lue was given the Silver Wilder Medal by the American
      Pomological Society for his orange. Lue died on June 3, 1925, in
      DeLand.


      =========


      Lue Gim Gong
      From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.
      Lue Gim Gong (呂金功, pinyin: Lǚ Jīngōng) is known for his
      contribution in Orange growing industry in Florida, USA.
      http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lue_Gim_Gong


      Born in 1859 to a family of Chinese farmers, Lue Gim Gong [1], was
      interested in America and the opportunities that lay over the
      Pacific Ocean. After his uncle returned from America when Lue was
      12, Lue pleaded with his parents to let him go with his uncle to
      America. His parents agreed, giving him a bolt of silk to sell when
      he arrived. He lived in a heavily Chinese populated area in San
      Francisco until the age 16 when he moved to North Adams,
      Massachusetts to work at a shoe factory. At this factory, Lue met
      Fannie Burlingame, his Sunday School teacher. When she learned of
      his skill with plants, she asked him to live with the Burlingame's
      to tend their greenhouse. She converted him to Christianity, and
      helped him become an American citizen in 1877.

      Lue had been advised to move to a warmer climate due to his recent
      contraction of tuberculosis. Due to his conversion, he was unable to
      return to China. Fannie recommended a relocation to DeLand, Florida,
      where she and her sister owned land. Lue agreed, and in 1885, he was
      working once again, this time in orange groves. Lue noticed that the
      oranges currently in use were very susceptible to cold weather.
      After experimenting, he finally developed an orange in 1888 that was
      both sweet and was hardy to cold weather. The "Lue Gim Gong Orange"
      is still grown in Florida today.

      In 1911, Lue was given the Silver Wilder Medal by the American
      Pomological Society for his orange. Lue died on June 3, 1925, in
      DeLand, Florida.


      =============


      http://www.nieworld.com/special/floridaquest/quest2002/hideawaytimes2
      .htm
      One of the heroes of DeLand's citrus industry, Lue Gim Gong, came to
      the area from Canton, China, by way of San Francisco. He arrived in
      San Francisco at the age of 12 and began working his way across the
      country to Massachusetts, where he met Fanny Burlingame. After he
      survived a bout with tuberculosis, Fanny brought Lue to DeLand where
      she had an orange grove.

      Lue had grown up on a farm in Canton and immediately began growing
      oranges alongside Fanny's brother-in-law, William Dumville. For
      several years, the two of them planted oranges and other fruits.

      Lue lost his groves in the freezes of 1894 and '95. Dumville died
      and his wife moved back North, leaving Lue to replant the groves on
      his own. After Fanny died, Lue continued to manage the groves and
      experiment with growing better oranges.

      In 1911, Lue cross-pollinated two varieties of oranges, the
      Mediterranean Sweet and the Hart's Late to create a new variety,
      which he named after himself. The new orange ripened early in the
      fall and was more resilient to cold. The Lue Gim Gong earned a
      Silver Wilder Medal from the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the
      first such award ever given for citrus.


      =======


      Lue Gim Gong
      http://66.102.7.104/search?
      q=cache:y_Etw0bRxtwJ:www.themadeleine.com/8.pages.03/Immigration/Lueg
      imgong.html+lue+gim+gong&hl=en


      Lue Gim Gong was famous for his talent to grow fruits and flowers.
      He was a Chinese immigrant, and he had quite an adventure in
      America. He experienced love, hate, and discrimination, but he had a
      passion that took him far.

      Lue Gim Gong was born in 1860 in Canton, China. During his
      childhood, his mother taught him how to grow citrus trees, and this
      came in hand in his future. Although he liked home, he wanted to
      leave and go to America.

      At the time of the Gold Rush, many immigrants flooded into
      California, Lue Gim Gong included. Like many others, his plan was to
      make a fortune in the year of 1872, but he was only twelve years
      old. When he failed to obtain mountains of gold, he started working
      in a shoe factory for one dollar per day. This was a bad time to
      start working in a factory because they were reducing their
      production, and they cut their worker's pay.

      Fortunately, while in the shoe factory, he was taught how to speak
      English. Many of his teachers saw the brilliance in this young man,
      and they knew that his skills would be useful somewhere.

      Fanny Burlingame was the daughter of an American diplomat who had
      negotiated the Burlingame Treaty in 1868. This treaty allowed the
      Chinese to immigrate to the United States and become permanent
      residents but not citizens. Fanny was the Sunday school teacher that
      Lue Gim Gong fell in love with after he moved in with her to work in
      her garden.

      Lue Gim Gong was very experimental. While in Fanny's garden, he felt
      free to crossbreed all different types of plants. He mainly devoted
      himself to working with oranges. He took one kind of orange and bred
      it with all different ones from around the world.

      After many combinations, Lue Gim Gong finally created what he was
      waiting for. The combination consisted of the "Hart's Late" orange
      and the "Mediterranean Sweet" orange. The product was called
      the "Lue Gim Gong." It could resist the cold, and its tree bore
      fruit nearly year round.

      Soon, many nurseries wanted the plant. It became extremely popular
      and tasty, and everyone was in love with the "Lue Gim Gong." It
      became the standard orange that caused Florida to be the nation's
      leading fruit producer. Lue Gim Gong was awarded with the Wilder
      Medal, and he was a very proud man.

      Although Lue Gim Gong is mostly known for his new orange, he had
      many other creations. From the skills that he learned from his
      mother, he bred a new type of tomato, he developed a fragrant
      grapefruit that grew singly on the branch instead of in clusters,
      and he created a rose bush with multi-colored petals. From his work
      with roses and other flowers, he claimed to have a cure for skin
      cancer, but it hasn't been proven to cure it.

      When Fanny died, Lue Gim Gong was allowed to become a citizen. He
      was left with the grove, but he was a bad businessman. Many cheated
      him out of his money and he became very poor. In 1925, he died
      almost penniless, but he had a happiness that no one could take
      away.


      ==========


      http://dhr.dos.state.fl.us/services/sites/floridians/?section=d
      Lue Gim Gong, born in China in 1860, became an American citizen in
      1877. Due to poor health he settled in DeLand. Using pollination
      techniques learned in China, he developed an apple that ripened a
      month ahead of other varieties and a tomato plant that grew in
      clusters. By watching bees, he learned to cross pollinate citrus,
      and crossed the Harts Late Orange with Mediterranean Sweet varieties
      to produce an orange that bears his name. He also produced a
      grapefruit able to withstand colder temperatures and stay on the
      tree longer. In 1911 the U.S. Department of Agriculture awarded him
      the Silver Wilder Medal for his work in developing citrus. Lue Gim
      Gong died in 1925. His Great Floridian plaque is located at the
      Stetson Gift and Flower Shop, 129 North Woodland Boulevard, DeLand.


      =====


      Lue Gim Gong:
      http://www.titusvillehomepage.com/florida_history.htm


      DeLand's Citrus Wizard: Lue Gim Gong lived and worked just west of
      DeLand from the 1880s until his death in 1925. An accomplished
      horticulturalist, Lue was often visited by many of the country's top
      botanists who called him the "Luther Burbank of Florida."
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