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[TV] Grace Park - Actress in Battlestar Galatica and others

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  • madchinaman
    Grace Park http://www.maximonline.com/girls_of_maxim/html/girl_1108.html Where you ve seen her: As the finest alien in the new Battlestar Galactica series.
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 28, 2005
      Grace Park
      http://www.maximonline.com/girls_of_maxim/html/girl_1108.html


      Where you've seen her:
      As the finest alien in the new Battlestar Galactica series.

      Queen of the jungle:
      "I had to do this one sex scene for Battlestar that wasn't a bedroom
      scene. It was outside in a forest under a lightning-and-thunder
      shower. I was like, 'So you want some crazy forest sex? OK, I
      gotcha.' In the end, they had to totally edit it down and take out
      all my moaning."

      Viva ass Vegas:
      "It was in Vegas on New Year's on the strip. It's packed with 2,000
      people on the street. Someone grabbed my ass, and I whipped around
      and there were 10 people. I picked one guy and I fuckin' reamed him!
      I scared the shit out of this guy. It was the wrong guy, but I
      didn't care…"

      Amazing Grace:
      "The craziest thing I did on a date was probably cutting through the
      lobby of the Wickaninnish Inn buck naked except for a yellow rain
      jacket and rubber boots, stripping down, and jumping into the ocean
      right in front of the hotel. Mind you, it was October and we were in
      Canada. Not only was it freezing; it was night and we couldn't see
      our clothes."


      ========


      Grace Park | Grace Park of Battlestar Galactica
      http://www.xenite.org/features/grace-park/


      Every now and then, an actress comes along who inspires legions of
      fans to set up memorials and dedications. We believe Grace Park will
      be just that kind of phenomenal sensation.

      While we cannot predict who will have the biggest GP site or what it
      will contain, we'll keep an eye on this one. We hope the operator
      doesn't fall by the wayside, as sometimes happens.

      We don't know who actually created the first Grace Park fan site on
      the Internet. But this is the first Grace Park fan site we found, so
      we're glad to point other people to it. Be encouraging. Be faithful.


      GRACE PARK FACTS

      Fans outside of Canada did not get to see much of Grace Park prior
      to the onset of Battlestar Galactica, but for four years she shared
      small screen time with Kristin Kreuk (of Smallville) in the hit show
      Edgemont.

      One of the big disappointments for some Stargate fans is that Grace
      Park and Elisabeth Rosen did not get to star in their own spin-off
      series as the new SGC team introduced to fans in the Season Six
      episode, "Proving Ground". Instead, the powers that be decided to
      launch a different kind of spin-off (Stargate: Atlantis).

      Grace Park went on to pick up the role of Sharon "Boomer" Valerii on
      Battlestar Galactica, so we're still happy to see her again, and on
      a regular basis at that.

      Born Jee Un Park on March 6, 1979 in Los Angeles, her family moved
      to Vancouver while she was just a child. One would have thought her
      chances for fame and success as an actress would have been limited.
      But then Vancouver grew up to become North America's second
      Hollywood.

      Grace Park also grew up, and she has taken the science fiction
      television audience by storm as the dynamic and ambivalent Cylon
      sleeper agent Sharon "Boomer" Valerii in Ronald D. Moore's new
      adaptation of Battlestar Galactica. Once a model, Grace cut her
      acting teeth on the CBC Network series Edgemont in the role of
      Shannon Ng. She has appeared in movies such as "Romeo Must Die"
      and "L.A. Law: The Movie", and has guest-starred on numerous
      television episodes for series like The Outer Limits, Dark Angel,
      The Immortal, and Stargate-SG1.

      Among her non-acting accomplishments, Grace Park has earned a degree
      in Psychology from the University of British Columbia. She speaks
      two languages fluently (English, Korean) and knows some Cantonese
      and French. She is also studying Spanish. Battlestar Galactica co-
      star Katie Sackhoff (Starbuck) mentioned in an interview with
      Starburst that she attended Grace's wedding in New Mexico in late
      2004.

      In 2003, Grace Park won the role of Sharon Valerii after trying out
      for the role of Galactica bridge crew member Dualla and being passed
      over for Starbuck. The original Boomer had been played by Herbert
      Jefferson, Jr., but Grace never watched the show prior to winning a
      part in the new mini-series, so she bypassed any intimidation some
      actors might feel at following in another's footsteps. Nonetheless,
      when long-time Battlestar Galactica fans heard that Boomer would be
      a woman, Grace felt the first stings of fannish backlash.


      Interviews with Grace Park
      About.Com
      ... had the opportunity to ask Grace Park a few questions in
      preparation for the mini-series. A few of those questions (click on
      the link to read the entire interview) include:
      Q. Are you related to Linda Park from Enterprise?
      A. No. I think there are six Park clans. I'm not sure which one
      Linda Park is in.

      Q. How do you see Boomer developing [if the series continues]?
      A.Well, she's the rookie, but she's come to see these people as
      family. She wants to carry on, and she has a lover and Boxey.
      There's an interesting storyline just with that.

      Q. ...While Ron Moore's script includes a number of male/female
      friendships and romances, there's little emphasis on friends of the
      same gender, male or female. Did you find that a problem in
      developing Boomer's character?
      A. In [a boot camp the cast attended prior to production] we
      established relationships between pilot and crew, soldier to
      soldier, so even though I didn't have to have a scene with Katie
      [Sackhoff, who plays Starbuck], it felt like the bond was there
      anyhow. Among all the cast, the bonds are so familial. It was so
      much of equals -- not "rivalry equals", but just, it didn't matter
      if you were a guy or a girl. My flight suit was the same as the
      guys, and so was what I had to do. They didn't try to make the girls
      look pretty, or any of that. They stripped it down to, "What are you
      doing? What do you want to contribute?"

      Eclipse Magazine
      ...spoke with Grace Park on January 3, 2005. Here are a few
      questions from their interview. Click on the link to read the full
      interview.

      Q. ...You have a degree in psychology, and once danced for twenty
      straight hours. That's a pretty odd combination. Obviously, you have
      the energy to handle the schedule for working on a weekly television
      series, but does your degree inform the way you choose your roles,
      or your performance once you've been cast?
      A. Psychology's given me a perspective of and fascination with
      people's behaviour and what motivates us. But when it comes to
      performance, though psychology will help, often the best things will
      come up organically and my job is then to get outta my own way and
      let things happen. That's not so easy as it sounds!

      Q. Now that 'Galactica' has gone to series, I see, from the
      screener, that there will be multiple arcs involving copies of
      Sharon - one on the Galactica, and one on Caprica. Obviously, the
      Sharon on Caprica must be aware of being a Cylon, but the one on the
      Galactica is a sleeper. Are you enjoying playing the differences
      between these two versions of the character? And how do you keep
      them similar enough to work in each context, but still acknowledge
      their differences?

      I love having the challenge of playing the two, it keeps me on my
      toes. It should not be evident how different the two characters are,
      because the one on Caprica should appear just as the one Helo came
      to know. Boomer's programming is naive and unaware, but the cylons
      are very good at what they do. They didn't get to where they are
      from nothing. It wouldn't work if I was all 'Ooo here I am evil,
      Mwah ha ha, Ooo - here I am good. But on set that's what we all
      refer to them as, good Sharon and bad Sharon. It's just that I don't
      know if it will be that simple for long...


      Q. Given that Sharon is a Cylon sleeper agent, one of at twelve
      models of human-like Cylons - each with many copies - it would seem
      that you have a fairly certain gig for as long as 'Galactica' airs.
      Given that possibility, what most excites you about playing the
      character, in all her possible forms?

      The range we can take this girl to, how dark she can get,
      vulnerable, finding out how her life will unfold and how she'll
      grapple with the insane challenges that'll come her way. Isn't that
      what's exciting about life?

      Galactica.TV
      ...Interviewed Grace Park in January 2004, just after New Year's.
      We're including a few questions here. Click on the link to read the
      entire interview. This is one of the best interviews done with
      Grace.

      Q. ...We were just talking about how strong your performance was in
      the miniseries, and what did you think? Did you enjoy your
      experience a lot?

      A. Oh my gosh, I loved it. You do a lot of shows and you end up, it
      just ends up being work, it's work but sometimes you do some work
      and it really seems a lot more like play and it was totally a blast.
      I have to say that there are...you always want to go back and re-do
      things... I mean acting wise, but I have to say quite a few of the
      scenes I'm pretty damn happy with.


      Q. Which [scenes from the miniseries would she want to redo]?

      A. Oh, I think there are certain takes like, when we touched down on
      Caprica and I had to leave without Helo, there was one turn-around
      shot where I was lifting off and supposed to be crying but it took
      like half an hour to set-up. And two minutes before we went to
      camera, I shut down emotionally. Totally. Or so I thought I did. And
      brutal cuz I remember Michael [Rymer] telling me on the third
      take, "You're just gonna have to act."


      Q. ...Well now...if you had to describe Boomer to somebody, what
      would you have to say about her? How would you describe her as a
      person?

      A. I would say that Boomer is a lot about survival, and she's a
      quick thinker, and she learns quickly, and she's feisty. She's
      competitive. She likes to have fun and she can totally be one of the
      guys. On one hand she can be a team player, but then she's also very
      independent and I think that stems from the fact that she lost her
      parents at a really young age and I think that's also why she's
      protective of Boxey.


      Q. ...Which scene do you think they spent most time on? You
      mentioned the one with Helo, was that the one that they spent the
      most time on with you?

      A. For us, yeah, definitely. That scene on Caprica, that took 2 days
      to do.


      Q. [Following immediately on the last question] That was a very
      emotional scene, a lot of emotion in that scene.

      A. Yeah there was, but you know what though, it's because Talmoh
      Penikett, who plays Helo, he's such a generous actor... and the
      whole thing was just fun. It's like when you were a kid and you
      played make-believe with your sister or friend... like that, having
      fun all day long. Plus we were kickin' back during setups.


      Q. ...What would you say is your fondest memory of the filming? Do
      you have like a special memory of like maybe a day or a moment, when
      you were filming this mini, that comes to your mind that you will
      never forget that will always kind of stick with you, maybe changed
      you or, I don't know, influenced you?

      A. Oooo, that's tough, cuz I wouldn't trade our bootcamp for
      anything. But from filming, it would have to be the scenes with
      Helo, on Caprica. That was so much fun, everything was fun. I mean,
      just arriving that day, I think it was like 6 in the morning. Seeing
      the Raptor parked out there in the field. "Look at that! That's our
      ship! It's so cool!" And all the crew was out there and everyone
      from all the extras got there and they were all dirtied up and there
      were like a hundred of them running through this field.

      Hollywood North Reporter
      Did a chat with Grace Park around the time of the mini-series, too.
      They passed her some interesting fan questions about her role as
      Lieutenant Satterfield in the "Proving Ground" episode of Stargate-
      SG1:

      Q. I loved you as Lt. Satterfield in Stargate SG-1's "Proving
      Ground". Do you know if your character will be returning anytime
      soon? Satterfield has become one of my favorite characters, and I
      would love to see her again!

      Angela H. Knoxville,TN
      A. Thanks! When we started shooting "Proving Ground" there were
      rumours that Stargate wasn't gonna go on, and so all of a sudden our
      characters were going to do a spin off. Holy crap! But I guess us
      rooks just didn't make the cut. And that's good because Stargate's
      been going strong ever since.


      Q. How did you get your guest spot on the episode "Proving Ground"
      as Lt. Satterfield, and what was it like working on the SG-1 set?
      Did you have to do many retakes on the scene where Satterfield
      dragged Dr. Jackson (Michael Shanks) across the floor?
      Thanks so much!

      Elyse D; CT
      A. I auditioned for Satterfield just like any other job and it paid
      off because being on the SG-1 set was lots of fun. And I didn't have
      to do many retakes, just enough to give Shanks a hard time.


      Q. Any anecdotes from the filming of that episode that you could
      share with us? Funny moments on the set, or your experiences in
      whatever training were provided in weapons, etc.? Thank you and best
      wishes for a prosperous 2004.

      Morjana C Sacramento, CA
      A. Yeah, Satterfield and Dr. Jackson had a scripted crush so Shanks
      make sure he gave me a hard time when he first met me, "Is that a
      military issued ponytail?"

      I quipped, "Is that a military issued come on?"

      It was all good after that.

      I remember on one of the days there was a young boy from the Make-A-
      Wish Foundation who got his wish, and that was to visit the set of
      Stargate and meet his favourite character Teal'c. They gave him a
      tour, he got his own staff, he helped 'direct', and he ate lunch
      with us. That was the best thing. Just to be able to be there. And
      the weapons! Why do I get such a kick out of them? The training was
      very professional and disciplined. One time, as a joke, between
      takes I pointed the dummy MP5 at another actor and Ron Blecker in
      charge of weapons pounced on me and chewed me out, and I nearly
      crapped my pants. So don't do what I did!


      Q. What was it like to work with Richard Dean Anderson in SG1?

      Lauren J. Port Moody, B.C.
      A. Richard Dean Anderson was hilarious, he was so funny to work with
      cuz he was totally himself, witty, dry, cocksure and dashing.


      ====================


      Grace Park's Filmography:
      Grace Park's Movie and TV roles
      http://www.xenite.org/features/grace-park/actress.html


      Battlestar Galactica (2004) TV Series, playing Raptor Pilot
      Lieutenant Sharon "Boomer" Valerii

      Human Cargo (2004) TV Mini-Series, playing Taiwanese Woman #1

      Battlestar Galactica (2003) TV Mini-Series, playing Lieutenant
      Sharon "Boomer" Valerii

      L.A. Law: The Movie (2002) TV movie, playing Charmaigne

      Edgemont (2000-2004) TV Series (Canada), playing Shannon Ng

      "Romeo Must Die" (2000, starring Jet Li), playing Asian Dancer


      Grace Park's TV Guest Appearances
      Gene Roddenberry's Andromeda, playing Doctor 26Carol in
      episode "Machinery of the Mind" (episode # 4.9), first broadcast on
      12 January 2004

      Jake 2.0, playing Fran Yoshida in episode "Upgrade" (episode #
      1.16), first broadcast in 2004

      Jake 2.0, playing Fran Yoshida in episode "Get Foley" (episode #
      1.14), first broadcast in 2004

      Jake 2.0playing Fran Yoshida in episode "Middleman" (episode # 1.8),
      first broadcast on 5 November 2003

      Jake 2.0, playing Fran Yoshida in episode "Last Man Standing"
      (episode # 1.6), first broadcast on 15 October 2003

      Stargate SG-1, playing Lieutenant Satterfield in episode "Proving
      Ground" (episode # 5.13), first broadcast on 8 March 2002

      Dark Angel, playing Female Breeding X5 in episode "Designate This"
      (episode # 2.1), first broadcast on 28 September 2001

      The Outer Limits, playing Satchko in episode "Time to Time" (episode
      # 7.15), first broadcast on 11 August 2001

      The Immortal, playing Mikiko in episode: "Kiyomi" (episode # 1.22),
      first broadcast on 2 June 2001

      The Immortal, playing Mikiko in episode "Deja Vu" (episode # 1.19),
      first broadcast on 12 May 2001

      The Immortal, playing Mikiko in episode "Replay" (episode # 1.16),
      first broadcast on 10 March 2001

      The Immortal, playing Mikiko in episode "Wicked Wicked West"
      (episode # 1.5), first broadcast on 4 November 2000

      The Immortal, playing Mikiko in episode "Demons of the Night: Part
      1" (episode # 1.1), first broadcast on 7 October 2000

      Secret Agent Man, playing Louann in episode "Uncle S.A.M." (episode
      # 1.9), first broadcast on 7 July 2000

      Secret Agent Man, playing Staffer #2 in episode "From Prima with
      Love" (episode # 1.1), first broadcast on 7 March 2000


      ===========================


      Grace Park on Boomer & Battlestar Galactica
      An interview on the show, being the rookie, and representing
      humanity.
      http://scifi.about.com/library/weekly/aa120603.htm


      Me: Are you related to Linda Park from Enterprise?

      GP: No. I think there are six Park clans. I'm not sure which one
      Linda Park is in.

      Me: In previous interviews with Katee Sackoff and Jamie Bamber,
      we've been able to talk about the connections between their
      characters and the original versions with Dirk Benedict and Richard
      Hatch. But your Boomer has almost nothing in common with the
      previous character by that name. How did that affect your approach
      to the role?

      GP: I certainly felt freer. I do love having Boomer be such an
      original character. But then, I think the whole Battlestar as it's
      coming out seems so fresh.

      Me: Do you share your fellow cast members' hope that this continues?

      GP: Oh, completely. I would love it to go to series. There's so much
      to work with.

      Me: How do you see Boomer developing, if it does?

      GP: Well, she's the rookie, but she's come to see these people as
      family. She wants to carry on, and she has a lover and Boxey.
      There's an interesting storyline just with that.

      Me: If you don't mind my saying, you're something of a rookie
      yourself, and the production has some pretty impressive veteran
      actors with Edward James Olmos and Mary McDonnel. How's that feel
      for you?

      GP: Well, it's just perfect that my character is the rookie pilot,
      and I'm probably one of the newest, youngest actors on the set. It
      doubles up on how much everything is new to me, and how much I have
      to learn, and how quickly I have to learn the ropes. I feel I have
      people to fall back on, in terms of being able to ask things.

      The boot camp we had [before the filming] brought us all together.
      It really drove home how we're not separate people, but a team. We
      had to be there for each other. For instance, once a couple of the
      actors forgot to bring their pens and hats, and the rest of us had
      to do push-ups until they came.

      Me: Highly motivational! I notice, though, that while Ron Moore's
      script includes a number of male/female friendships and romances,
      there's little emphasis on friends of the same gender ' male or
      female. Did you find that a problem in developing Boomer's character?

      GP: In that boot camp, we established relationships between pilot
      and crew, soldier to soldier, so even though I didn't have to have a
      scene with Katie, it felt like the bond was there anyhow. Among all
      the cast, the bonds are so familial. It was so much of equals --
      not "rivalry equals," but just, it didn't matter if you were a guy
      or a girl. My flight suit was the same as the guys, and so was what
      I had to do. They didn't try to make the girls look pretty, or any
      of that. They stripped it down to, "What are you doing? What do you
      contribute?"

      Me: They were really stressing the whole team thing.

      GP: Yeah. My biggest challenge with the flight suit was its size. I
      mean, it was for a gorilla, or something. They had to downsize it
      three times.

      Me: And so how was it to see the finished product at the premiere?

      GP: I was completely was into the story. Only once in a while did I
      pop out and think, "Oh, look at those effects, They're so good."

      [The destruction of Caprica] felt so 911 -- the hopelessness of it.
      I remember back then watching the towers fall over and over, and I
      remember how odd it was that a non-organic object exploding and how
      painful it was. And then there I was watching this and I'm crying,
      and I had to remind myself this time there weren't really people
      dying. But it really took me back there.

      Me: Now, I have to ask if you saw any of the original show on your
      own before shooting.

      GP: No, but I really liked the episodes we saw in boot camp. I'm
      ordering the Battlestar DVD to see the rest.

      Me: What did you like?

      GP: Well, I see the history of the show. I realize the significance
      of, "By your command," the weight of the power struggle, and what
      the Cylons have meant.

      The original is so different from what we've done, but I think it's
      really of the time. I know in the '70s it was a popular show, but TV
      is so different now -- cutting edge visual effects, with computer
      and CGI that have to be top-of-the-line, because everyone is looking
      to see if it's CGI or not. There has to be so much put in to it on
      that level.

      But I also think the audiences then were much more innocent and
      accepting. I don't think we could get away with copying just the
      same thing. Instead, our version has much more emphasis on having
      the good guys with flaws, and the villains with good parts. It's
      meant to challenge the audience that's used to black and white.

      Me: Are you a sci-fi fan?

      GP: I wouldn't call myself that. There are so many kinds of sci-fi
      within the genre. I love the Battlestar approach. And while I'm not
      a Star Trek fan, if I do sit down and get into an episode, I'll
      watch it to the end.

      Me: laughs

      GP: Well, I don't watch TV. I know I'm an actor, and show people are
      going to give me a lot of shit because I'm on it but I don't watch
      it. But, I gotta tell you, now I can't wait to get my Cylon head.
      I'm totally getting into the whole thing. It's like, "Wow, I have an
      invitation to the premiere, and it's silver!"

      Me: I notice that your TV work is almost all sci-fi. I have this
      theory that sci-fi actors get tagged by the industry. It's as if
      once you prove you can act in front of a blue screen, sci-fi
      producers put you in the pool. Can you confirm any of this, or am I
      just making stuff up?

      GP: Well, that might be totally true, but I don't know. I try not to
      do any blue screen stuff, but the thing is, if you have to create a
      full reality in thirty seconds in an audition, then you can do it on
      the set. You have to place yourself into a parallel universe looking
      through the Stargate. There's that element of fantasy or pure denial
      of looking at what's right in front of you and making yourself
      believe something else. I think that crosses over between sci-fi
      roles.

      Me: Hmm. How do you get there into such a fantasy state when you're
      in front of the cameras?

      GP: I just reach deep into my denial.

      Me: Well, if this thing goes to series, are you prepared to be a sci-
      fi idol?

      GP: I would DEFINTIELY love to have an action figure made. A friend
      of mine has some and it's really a whole world. Other than the toy,
      though, I think I'm pretty nervous -- I have no idea what that
      entails.

      I do know that some of the cast members are getting hate mail and
      even got some before we started shooting. There's that much
      animosity -- acting is playing, and we wanna just play. Meanwhile,
      you don't know what people are typing into their computer at four in
      the morning.

      But you know, that's kind of how it goes. The [showbiz] industry is
      really fear-based. You're not really sure what everyone thinks about
      you, but you have to go out there anyway.

      Me: Well, it seems to be particularly hard for women and minority
      actors in sci-fi. They seem to be expected to lead the way in social
      behavior to prove equality, or something.

      GP: I think there is an inherent pressure to represent the
      population -- and for me, there's really that Asian pressure. You
      have to be PC, and all you want is for people to look at you as a
      person and as a character.

      Now Boomer, she is the rookie and she's not as tough as Starbuck, so
      I don't have as much pressure to be...well, people wanna see that my
      character would be strong, able, smart. But at the same time I'm
      starting to see that people's strength is their vulnerability.

      Taking acting classes, you go deep inside and you're crying and you
      hate life, but after a while it's not that bad. Sometimes I feel
      that calmness in that state, and then so I realize that everyone
      feels pressure to "be a certain way" to hold on their values, but I
      think it's because everyone's really scared. So if you get to that
      place where they're scared and live through it and be brave, because
      you can't have courage without fear, and you can pull through, I
      think that that's a kind of statement for humanity. It doesn't
      matter how you do your hair, if we look like Playboy playmates, or
      the other extreme. It's really good to show people you can go
      through your weakness and succeed.

      I think that's what I like about Battlestar Galactica: everyone is
      the most scared they've ever been, and yet somehow they manage to
      make it through.

      Me: You know, you're talking about Boomer, but that sounds so much
      like the President's character, her journey from being Secretary of
      Education on a PR assignment to taking command.

      GP: Absolutely. You know, at the premiere, when she and Adama are
      vying for control, people were laughing in recognition of her
      strength in a female fashion -- not weaker, just different type of
      strength. It's complex, but people all knew what was going on.

      Me: Well, thanks so much for your time. I'll be watching it again on
      Monday, and I really hope it makes it to series.


      =====================

      ECLIPSE MAGAZINE INTERVIEW
      http://www.eclipsemagazine.com/modules/news/article.php?storyid=1258


      EM:

      You have racked up quite a list of credits in a fairly short period
      of time, from working on a quirky series from The Two Barrys
      [Sonnenfeld and Josephson], to recurring roles on 'The Immortal'
      and 'Jake 2.0, to the Gemini-winning mini-series, Human Cargo'.
      Mostly, it seems, you've worked on science fiction and fantasy
      projects. Do you have a preference for them, or is that just the way
      things have happened, so far?

      GP:

      Location, location, location. Being in Vancouver there's a buffet of
      sci-fi shows to fill up on and I'm chowing down and gettin fat on
      BSG.

      EM:

      I note that you have a degree in psychology, and once danced for
      twenty straight hours. That's a pretty odd combination. Obviously,
      you have the energy to handle the schedule for working on a weekly
      television series, but does your degree inform the way you choose
      your roles, or your performance once you've been cast?

      GP:

      Psychology's given me a perspective of and fascination with people's
      behaviour and what motivates us. But when it comes to performance,
      though psychology will help, often the best things will come up
      organically and my job is then to get outta my own way and let
      things happen. That's not so easy as it sounds!

      EM:

      How did the role of Sharon 'Boomer' Valerii come to you?

      GP:

      I auditioned like any other job. Originally I auditioned for Dualla,
      then Starbuck. Finally, they didn't know what to do with me so they
      gave me this tiny part to play of Sharon.

      EM:

      I think a lot of people were surprised when the 'Battlestar
      Galactica' miniseries turned out to be so good [though they probably
      shouldn't have been, considering that Ronald Moore had just done
      some amazing work on HBO's 'Carnivale'].

      The biggest twist, in the mini-series, was that Cylons have evolved
      and now look like us - and Sharon is a Cylon sleeper. What did you
      think when you finished reading the script and saw that?

      GP:

      What the hell? When did they change the ending like that? Did they
      do that after they cast me? And what does that mean? [Then this huge
      mischievous grin spread across my face... Mwah ha ha ha!]

      EM:

      Now that 'Galactica' has gone to series, I see, from the screener,
      that there will be multiple arcs involving copies of Sharon - one on
      the Galactica, and one on Caprica. Obviously, the Sharon on Caprica
      must be aware of being a Cylon, but the one on the Galactica is a
      sleeper. Are you enjoying playing the differences between these two
      versions of the character? And how do you keep them similar enough
      to work in each context, but still acknowledge their differences?

      GP:

      I love having the challenge of playing the two, it keeps me on my
      toes. It should not be evident how different the two characters are,
      because the one on Caprica should appear just as the one Helo came
      to know. Boomer's programming is naive and unaware, but the cylons
      are very good at what they do. They didn't get to where they are
      from nothing. It wouldn't work if I was all 'Ooo here I am evil,
      Mwah ha ha, Ooo - here I am good. But on set that's what we all
      refer to them as, good Sharon and bad Sharon. It's just that I don't
      know if it will be that simple for long...

      EM:

      When you have sleeper agents in a series [as in real life], there is
      always the possibility that they might find their cover life more
      appealing than their former 'real' life. I suspect that Galactica's
      Sharon might just have a bit of a decision to make, once she
      realizes that she's a Cylon sleeper agent. Do you think [from what
      you know about the character, so far] that she might choose to fight
      her Cylon programming in that event? How might her relationship with
      Chief Tyrol affect that?

      GP:

      I think that sleeping Sharon may not be so happy with herself when
      she wakes up, but in a big way, she doesn't have a choice. Her
      default programming can completely override her awareness, and that
      challenge is much greater than the psychological and emotion hurdle.
      As for the chief, they're on the rocks [as in real life], but he'll
      always have a direct line to her heart. If he works it, anything's
      possible.

      EM:

      In most military services, such a relationship between an officer
      and someone under her command would be against regulations. Will we
      see anything develop along these lines in Sharon's relationship with
      Tyrol?

      GP:

      Yes. Normally this behaviour would have severe reprimands, but for
      many reasons from the war, Adama's soft spot, and her personal
      history, the Commander and XO would just look the other way.

      EM:

      On a more general note, I'm hearing that the buzz for the series is
      at least as good as for the mini-series [which was, after 'Angels in
      America', the best mini-series, last season]. What's your take on
      the quality level of the 'Battlestar Galactica: The Series?

      GP:

      Outta this world

      EM:

      Given that Sharon is a Cylon sleeper agent, one of at twelve models
      of human-like Cylons - each with many copies - it would seem that
      you have a fairly certain gig for as long as 'Galactica' airs. Given
      that possibility, what most excites you about playing the character,
      in all her possible forms?

      GP:

      The range we can take this girl to, how dark she can get,
      vulnerable, finding out how her life will unfold and how she'll
      grapple with the insane challenges that'll come her way. Isn't that
      what's exciting about life?

      EM:

      Finally, considering the hullabaloo about making Starbuck and Boomer
      women, how has the response been to Sharon?

      GP:

      It's been very warm. So far... Last year I had a lot less to chew.
      This year my role will be sure to draw more attention, both good and
      bad. And I'm ready. Bring it.

      EM:

      Thank you for your time, Ms Park. Good luck with 'Battlestar
      Galactica' - may things work out for at least one of you...


      ============


      (Interview was conducted on January 2, 2004 by Farvoyager.)
      http://www.galactica2003.net/articles/park010404.shtml


      I am psyched.

      This is going to be a perfect day.

      Not only do I have the day after New Years off with pay... I am also
      expecting a very special phone call today.

      From Grace Park. One of my newest science fiction heroes. She
      recently took on a controversial role, one that's met with a fair
      share of dissension among the rather mercurial fandom of Battlestar
      Galactica.

      It's 11:45am. I am reviewing other online interviews with Grace. She
      is so well spoken. She has a quick, witty mind and comes up with
      some great responses to questions she's been asked in the past. I
      can't wait to see how she'll respond to our questions.

      My cat jumps onto my lap and starts purring. He wants some attention
      now and normally I would acquiesce to his demands but I'm afraid
      that his rumbling might interfere with our interview, so I banish
      him to the bedroom for the time being.

      The phone rings.

      Its Grace!

      She asks if she can call back in half an hour as she is still
      prepping for the interview.

      No problem I say. I'm doing some prepping myself.

      While I wait, I refresh myself again with her character.

      Grace Park portrayed Lt. Sharon "Boomer" Valerii in the recent
      remake of Battlestar Galactica.

      In the original 1978 Battlestar Galactica, Herb Jefferson Jr.
      portrayed Lt. Boomer, the sidekick and sometimes anchor of reason to
      the ever-capricious Lt. Starbuck, played by a grinning and gambling
      Dirk Benedict.

      Grace brings a whole new dynamic to this character in the Sci Fi
      Channel's recent two-part miniseries which premiered on December 8th
      2003.

      Somewhat of a rookie actress herself, she portrays a rookie Colonial
      Warrior who is rapidly becoming a veteran of war against the Cylons.
      In one of the most compelling scenes, she leaves her comrade Lt.
      Helo behind on Caprica to die when he gives his seat on their Raptor
      to Gaius Baltar, a computer genius and (as-yet-unknown to the
      colonials) the traitor of humankind.

      I admire the courage both Grace and her colleague Katee Sackhoff
      have shown in taking on these controversial roles and now I have
      chance to tell Grace that in person! How exciting.

      The phone rings. Its Grace!

      Battlestar Galactica 2003: Happy New year!

      Grace Park: Yeah, Happy New Year!

      BG2003: Are you having an enjoyable one?

      GP: I am so far. [Laughs]

      BG2003: Well that's good.

      GP: Why? Did you go out?

      BG2003: You know what? I didn't. I got so tired. Its been a long
      week for me and I'm just getting over a cold.

      GP: Oh...

      BG2003: So... I decided to stay home and see the fireworks go off.

      [At this point we chat a little about what the firework shows were
      like where we both live, and I think... she is so down to earth.
      This is going to be a lot more fun than interviewing politicians! If
      only I could have had more assignments like this back in my news-
      hound days. Comfortable banter established, I segue into the
      interview.]

      BG2003: I really want you to know that I enjoyed your performance in
      the miniseries.

      GP: Well thanks!

      BG2003: And I'm a Battlestar Galactica fan myself. I watched the
      show when I was 13 and it was a big deal to me back then, and I was
      real excited to see the remake done, so it was pretty nice to have
      that re-envisioned. And I've been looking forward to talking with
      you!

      GP: Oh. Thanks. Well it's... you know there has been so much
      controversy around it...

      BG2003: I know...

      GP:... and it being all re-imagined...

      BG2003: ..and I really commend you from taking on the part that
      you've taken...

      GP: [laughs]

      BG2003: I mean really! You and Katee both. You guys both deserve a
      hand. Cause that had to have been quite a challenge.

      GP: Yes... I think I must have been out of the line of fire or
      something. I mean I didn't get any of that type of hard stuff coming
      at me, at least not that I've noticed so far.

      BG2003: OK great! Well, we were just talking about how strong your
      performance was in the miniseries, and what did you think? Did you
      enjoy your experience a lot?

      GP: Oh my gosh, I loved it. You do a lot of shows and you end up, it
      just ends up being work, its work but sometimes you do some work and
      it really seems a lot more like play and it was totally a blast. I
      have to say that there are... you always want to go back and re-do
      things...I mean acting wise, but I have to say quite a few of the
      scenes I'm pretty damn happy with.

      BG2003: Alright!

      GP: And if I had to go do them again it would be different maybe.
      But not necessarily better. But then again there's other scenes that
      I would [laughing] love to go back and re-do.

      BG2003: Which ones are those?

      GP: Oh, I think there are certain takes like, when we touched down
      on Caprica and I had to leave without Helo, there was this one turn-
      around shot where i was lifting off and supposed to be crying but it
      took like half an hour to set-up. And two minutes before we went to
      camera, i shut down emotionally. Totally. Or so i thought i did. And
      brutal cuz i remember Michael [Rymer] telling me on the 3rd
      take, "you're just gonna have to 'act.'"

      BG2003: Oh, it was harder to connect the next time around.

      GP: Yes, but no. My ego got in the way and decided to shut down my
      artist...Actor talk. But what happened was I ended up going home and
      the next morning I woke up and then everything hit me, bawled my
      eyes out, thought i was a horrible soldier, that i killed him,
      Boomer & Helo forever... I tried to rationalize that in some cases
      characters are not always going to be emotional all the time, but I
      just consider it a lesson learned.

      BG2003: I imagine that's very hard to be able to dredge up your real
      personal emotions and then connect them with that character you're
      playing.

      GP: Yeah but actually on that day when I did that one, there wasn't
      any personal stuff going on. I was so locked into Boomer and Helo,
      and there wasn't any thought of bringing up [my] personal past and
      hooking onto that, it was just, I was crying about Helo and how I
      missed him and how horrible it was and you know, how I had his dog-
      tags and just all this other stuff that was going on. I was locked
      right into it.

      BG2003: Wow. You have a very strong identification with your
      character.

      GP: Yeah, sometimes [laughs]

      BG2003: How familiar were you with the original Battlestar Galactica
      before you got the role?

      GP: Not very. "Battlestar Galactica? Rings a bell...."

      BG2003: Really?

      GP: The title, yeah. I didn't watch it when I grew up, and I didn't
      really know it at all. Because... I knew it was something big
      though, cause when I got the audition I was "ooh this could be huge."

      BG2003: & GP: [laughing]

      GP: Everyone I knew was all "oh Battlestar Galactica, I remember
      that, so you're going out for that?" I was like "yeah". So wow, I
      was pretty stoked on that. Did you say before I auditioned or before
      the screen test?

      BG2003: Before you got the role I guess

      GP: No I hadn't seen it at all. And also, originally, I had gone out
      for two different characters before I finally got Boomer...

      BG2003: Really? Which other characters did you audition for?

      GP: At first I went out for Dualla. And then I auditioned with Katee
      for Starbuck.

      BG2003: Wow! So you almost got that role, huh? Or vied for it?

      GP: It was 7 girls and 6 guys for Starbuck and Apollo. Then it was
      down to the last four and we were "this is it."

      BG2003: So did you say they had some men also audition for that
      part?

      GP: No, no, it was actually 6 guys going for Apollo.

      BG2003: Oh OK.

      GP: And then, we were going for Starbuck.

      BG2003: What kind of preparation work did you have to do prior to
      the audition?

      GP: I got some coaching from one of my teachers Michèle Lonsdale
      Smith. I think what I had to do is first of all was relax and stop
      this weird thing i was doing cuz the part was a "lead." I had to get
      coaching on the military role, but also what was going on with the
      part, with the reality of that scene. Not trying necessarily to
      act "military" or act "tough" or anything "spacey" nothing like
      that. And then, just before I went in for the screen test, I got
      some, kind of, business coaching from Barbara Deutsch. And she told
      me "at this point its not about how well you can act", and that
      confused me. "Everyone in the room at this point can act. Everyone
      knows you can act. And that's not the point. Now its, whether or not
      you can get through the room."

      BG2003: Oh wow...

      GP: That was interesting cause there were about 3 or 4 hours of us
      waiting around for our contracts to come through [laughs], you know
      and it was either your nerves are getting more and more frazzled or
      you're like, just sort of kicking it back. And Katee was just
      totally relaxed.

      BG2003: [laugh] She was probably nervous too, it just didn't show!

      GP: Oh, I dunno, she was pretty chill.

      BG2003: Really...

      GP: But you know, you kind of have to be or else you'd crack in the
      room!

      BG2003: I bet, I bet. Did you have to be, I mean, you were in such
      good shape, watching you in that show, I'm envious I wish I could be
      in that kind of shape - [laughs] what kind of workout regimen do you
      do?

      GP: Oh, I'm not in good shape...

      BG2003: Oh! But those muscles - I mean - you're buff! [Laugh] You
      must work out...

      GP: You know I think I just have good muscle memory. I used to work
      out a lot before. But I don't do that much working out, like Katee
      and Jamie are the hard core ones, they were working out every day
      solid, running and at the gym and they were super hardcore.

      BG2003: Wow. And you don't hardly work out at all? You must work
      out! You must have a regimen that you do...

      GP: Like I said, I used to work out a lot, but i go through phases.
      In Vancouver there's the Grouse Grind...

      BG2003: Mm-hmm...

      GP: ...and I used to do that ... but now I'm just, I don't know, I'm
      getting a lot healthier, but its kind of like mind and body?

      BG2003: Uh-huh...

      GP: And no, I don't really work out. I think maybe my muscles just
      looks like I'm working out? [laughs]

      BG2003: Well, I wish I had that kind of luck! [Laughs]. So what,
      what was the reaction when you learned that you got the role?

      GP: I think I was pretty calm... And my agent called me and I
      said "OK, cool. Awesome, well that sounds good. " And I think I
      asked a couple questions, put down the phone and took a deep breath
      and then I walked a few steps away from my desk and then I totally
      broke out in song and dance!

      GP & BG2003: [Laughing]

      GP: It was like I was in my apartment and I just went nuts! I can't
      remember what I sang or what I did but it was like I was on Broadway
      all of a sudden and I just broke into song and I was racing around
      my apartment. I was ecstatic. I think I was screaming. It was so
      cool, and then I like went to the phone and started calling people.

      BG2003: Oh I bet. I bet. Who was the first person you called?

      GP: I think it was my boyfriend. Either my boyfriend or my parents.

      BG2003: Wow. How exciting! Well now... if you had to describe Boomer
      to somebody, what would you have to say about her? How would you
      describe her as a person?

      GP: I would say that Boomer is a lot about survival, and she's a
      quick thinker, and she learns quickly, and she's feisty. She's
      competitive. She likes to have fun and she can totally be one of the
      guys. On one hand she can be a team player, but then she's also very
      independent and I think that stems from the fact that she lost her
      parents at a really young age and I think that's also why she's
      protective of Boxey.

      BG2003: Yes, that's right. Wasn't she an orphan? Boomer?

      GP: Yeah. She was orphaned when, I think... No, I say that she was
      orphaned when she was one or two, something like that.

      BG2003: She was adopted, or wasn't there something about that?

      GP: I don't remember that particular line. But yeah I said that I
      was, like when we went to boot camp and we had to come up with a bit
      of our backstory and I said that on Picon my parents had died when i
      was 1 or 2, and i was raised by my mom's sisters on Gemon.... but I
      think if they change it, it they change it. Because this is what we
      made up ourselves.

      BG2003: That would be - do you think that would be interesting to go
      into, if this goes to series, which we all hope it does, um,
      wouldn't that be interesting, maybe like a flashback episode?

      GP: Yeah that would be pretty cool! That would be very interesting.

      BG2003: You could delve a little bit deeper into who Boomer is and
      explore that character a little bit.

      GP: Yeah. Exactly. I would like to be able to do that. I think
      because there's the fact that she was orphaned, and she has this,
      like she's searching, though I'm not sure even what she's searching
      for. I think there's that. And so that's why the Battlestar
      Galactica, or the people on it, the crew and pilots are totally her
      family.

      BG2003: Yeah. And I also get the idea that off screen you're family
      as well, I mean you've gone to this boot camp with the other actors,
      you must have a real strong sense of family with the rest of the,
      with your co-workers.

      GP: Exactly and its not competitive at all, its just comradery and
      its fun. We, in a sense we all connect to each other and we're all
      looking out for each other.

      BG2003: That's wonderful. Here's another question that we have here.
      How would you rate your experience playing Boomer versus other
      characters you've played in the past?

      GP: Oh, Boomer was the most fun! I got to do so much with her. She
      was easily my biggest character. I fleshed her out, and over the
      course of a two part miniseries, that's huge.

      BG2003: Yeah. How many hours would you say you guys spent, or how
      many hours did you spend filming?

      GP: Oh I, I think I had 12 or 16 shooting days, and each day being,
      I don't know, about 8 to 14 hours.

      BG2003: Wow, that's a lot of work.

      GP: Oh yeah, but its fun. I think the crew did most of the work...

      BG2003: [laughing] Oh yeah the camera guys and everything...

      GP: Definitely!

      BG2003: Yeah. And then having to re-shoot... which scene do you
      think they spent the most time on? You mentioned the one with Helo,
      was that the one that they spent the most time on with you?

      GP: For us, yeah, definitely. That scene in Caprica, that took 2
      days to do.

      BG2003: That was a very emotional scene, a lot of emotion in that
      scene.

      GP: Yeah there was, but you know what though, its because Tahmoh
      Penikett, who plays Helo, he's such a generous actor... and the
      whole thing was just fun. It's like when you were a kid and you
      played make-believe with your sister or friend...like that, having
      fun all day long. Plus we were kickin back during setups.

      BG2003: Fun. That sounds like a lot of fun. How do you think that
      Boomer would react if she found out all about Baltar's treachery, in
      view of the fact that Helo gave up his seat for Baltar, how do you
      think that Boomer would react if she were to then find out about how
      Baltar is a traitor?

      GP: I don't think it would be in Baltar's best interests for Boomer
      to find out.

      BG2003: [Laugh!] I guess not!

      GP: No.

      BG2003: No! [laughing]

      GP: There would probably be a low rumble, and a slow boil and
      then... I can't say what would happen after that.

      BG2003: Ooh! I think it would be interesting to see!

      GP: Oh yeah, yeah definitely.

      BG2003: Your role was, some would say, was probably the second most
      controversial change, according to some of the "purist" fans,
      because of the gender change, like with Katee playing Starbuck and
      there is a lot of controversy associated with that, but what is your
      feeling, what is your opinion on the gender changes that were made
      to Starbuck and Boomer for the remake?

      GP: I love it, because that's why I have a job.

      BG2003: [Laugh] That's a good way to put it.

      GP: Other than that, I think it was really essential for there to be
      some female pilots, the main ones, not secondary ones...

      BG2003: Mm-hmm...

      GP: And I know that for the fans of the original Battlestar
      Galactica, the top 3 pilots would be Apollo, Starbuck and Boomer.

      BG2003: Right

      GP: And I think they would have had to change at least one, if not
      two.

      BG2003: You know and I remember back when I was 13 even at that age
      I remember kind of wishing even then there had been a woman pilot.

      GP: Oh yeah?

      BG2003: Yeah!

      GP: I know, its like something's missing!

      BG2003: And the pilots have all the fun. Its like, I didn't want to
      be the one sitting back on the Galactica, "Oh where's my honey? He's
      out fighting" I'd want to be out there kicking butt! So, I think its
      great, and do you think that, would you envision Boomer as sort of a
      role model for young people watching this show?

      GP: I guess so, because she's a female and she's strong [and] she
      takes the initiative and yeah, so in that way it gives people
      something to look towards, it gives them a voice. Or a sense that
      for them, that they can do it.

      BG2003: Yeah and you know I think it would have made a big
      difference to me when I was 13 years old, to see a woman, you know
      flying – and I remember the one, they had one episode in the
      original series where all the men got sick and so then the females -
      the women were allowed...

      GP: [laughs] I saw it! I saw that episode I think. And all the women
      stepped up?

      BG2003: Yeah and the women got a chance, but its kind of so I mean
      it was probably a big step back in 1978 but... today it would be
      kind of a...

      GP: [Laughing] Well today's climate for women, trying to take a step
      forward and they're not having to be better than the men, but they
      are trained in the same field and we're all supportive of each
      other.

      BG2003: Exactly.

      GP: So I think its very important. I think they had to change it!

      BG2003: Yeah, I think you're right. I was very, I was at first
      shocked when I saw the changes and then I thought, "this could be
      really cool". I thought "this could be really good." Do you feel a
      lot of pressure on you as a woman and as a minority sometimes in
      this role?

      GP: I don't feel think I feel any pressure as a woman. Because I
      think Katee was at the forefront for that.

      BG2003: Right.

      GP: As a minority, well, maybe its just there every day of my life
      so I don't really think its even necessarily that much stronger, or
      that much more significant. But I don't think that because I'm a
      minority that there's a big difference. Actually I thought because
      I'm not Black maybe the NAACP would be giving me a call... [laughs]

      BG2003: Oh, there's been some rumblings in fandom I think about the
      lack of an African American lead, but I don't know I think maybe
      when they go to series they could explore that further. And then
      there was Dualla...

      GP: A lot of people died. So there's gonna be more pilots changed,
      there's gonna be more cast members.

      BG2003: Right.

      GP: I just watched the pilot episode last night...

      BG2003: Uh-huh?

      GP: And it was so good! I loved it!

      BG2003: The original or the one you were in?

      GP: The original.

      BG2003: Oh wow. And you really liked it.

      GP: Oh yeah, I totally loved it. And I noticed there was actually a
      major lack of Asian characters.

      BG2003: There was.

      GP: Yeah, and also Hispanic, so its like "hey what's up with that?"

      BG2003: What I noticed for myself, is, with this remake it seems was
      a lot more broad based. It had characters of just about every ethnic
      background that I could think of, I mean, you know with Olmos there,
      and then yourself, and then of course, Dualla, and I was really
      impressed with that.

      GP: I think its really representative of our world as we see it...

      BG2003: Yeah.

      GP: ...and things being so global now and the world seemingly
      getting smaller. I think it just happens to be a better
      representation of humanity.

      BG2003: yeah.

      GP: And its not, I mean originally there were more Caucasians on the
      show...

      BG2003: Yeah.

      GP: ...and I think I really like the way its going now. It feels
      more global and universal, I guess. You get the feeling that it is
      really different tribes, and we survived, people are coming
      together...

      BG2003: Right, which is what it is. How would you describe Boomers
      relationship with Starbuck? I mean in the original they had this
      kind of a comradery with Boomer and Starbuck, they were buddies and
      in some ways Boomer was kind of like Starbuck's anchor, because
      Starbuck was very capricious and Boomer would kind of say, "OK,
      Buddy, reel it in a little bit." Do you, I mean do you see kind of a
      similar relationship between you and Starbuck in this series?

      GP: I don't think that much. I think because Starbuck is, I think
      she's more rebellious than Boomer and can fight a lot more often
      than Boomer so in that way, comparatively, I could be an anchor, but
      I don't think in that way Boomer's necessarily a strong anchor.
      There is definitely a comradery between us. Boomer totally looks up
      to Starbuck, and she is the pilot of the fleet...

      BG2003: So she looks up to her.

      GP: Exactly. I look up to her and we have a great time. And I think
      that they would probably be the closest, well for Boomer at least,
      Starbuck's my closest female friend and i like to think of her as my
      sidekick.

      BG2003: Oh yeah? She's your sidekick? [Laughs]

      GP: [Laughs]

      BG2003: That's cute!

      GP: But I think for Starbuck, on the Galactica she took Boomer under
      her wing, because I'm young and I'm the rook.

      BG2003: The rookie.

      GP: Exactly.

      BG2003: OK. With Chief Tyrol. What is the chemistry there, why is it
      that Boomer is so drawn to him?

      GP: How can you resist a man who's in charge and in uniform?

      BG2003: [Laughs] And he's good looking too!

      GP: He's ruggedly handsome, definitely. But it's because he's
      charming, passionate, loyal, and great in the rack.

      BG2003: Yeah [laughs] and we've already discussed the Helo and
      Boomer thing so I'm going to move on and talk about Boxey. You have
      a lot of scenes, in the miniseries where you're getting to know
      Boxey better, do you think there might be, I mean is Boomer like
      officially adopting Boxey? Do you see that if they go to series, do
      you see her sort of becoming a surrogate type parent for Boxey?

      GP: I think so, but I think it's interesting because Boomer is not
      the mothering and maternal type.

      BG2003: Yeah.

      GP: And I think that the miniseries, I think that the story explores
      a lot of relationships that aren't so typical, are unpredictable,
      and so I really like how they paired me and Boxey together. Right
      off the bat, visually, we're not a natural match, I'm asian and
      Boxey's white. But I think it speaks of life, how we're continuously
      thrown into new situations, and it seems to be the only way we grow.
      And it is interesting to see how people adapt and change to these
      needs.

      BG2003: And yet there's that, that you have in common, you're both
      orphans.

      GP: Exactly

      BG2003: So maybe Boomer empathizes with Boxey? I mean she sees this
      child and it reminds her of herself.

      GP: Exactly and I totally have an instinct to protect him.

      BG2003: With the ending of the Battlestar Galactica miniseries there
      was this cliffhanger... with Boomer possibly being a Cylon or the
      Cylons making a duplicate. What is your take on that? Is Boomer a
      sleeper agent?

      GP: That's classified.

      BG2003: Ahhh! You can't tell us?

      GP: No, I just like to say that. [Laughs]

      BG2003: [Laughs.] You just like to say that.? [Laughs]

      GP: Can I?

      BG2003: Huh?

      GP: Naw, I can't give everything away. We wouldn't have anything to
      watch!

      BG2003: Ahhh! Now that sounds like a pretty big hint that we have
      something to expect...

      GP: [Laughs]

      BG2003: I bet you're stoked.

      GP: Oh, yeah, completely. When I originally read the script for
      Starbuck I read the whole thing with her in mind and then I hadn't
      read the script again for a while until after I got Boomer and then
      I read the ending! I was totally floored!

      BG2003: Oh wow!

      GP: I don't know how I missed that! [laughs]

      BG2003: [laughs]

      GP: I thought when I read the script originally, Starbuck gets in a
      lot of fights, she's so feisty, and I'm like "oh Boomer, what does
      Boomer do, she's all emotional..."

      BG2003: Oh I dunno....

      GP: ...not at all!

      BG2003: That "By Your Command" chilled me...

      GP: Oh yeah I know.

      BG2003: "By Your Command." OK. Does Boomer know how to fly a Viper?
      Is she going to be a Viper pilot?

      GP: Oh hell yeah she knows how to fly a Viper but she's not
      necessarily a Viper pilot.

      BG2003: The Raptor seems to be her area...

      GP: Oh yeah, the Raptor is totally her shit. Totally.

      BG2003: [Laughs] Well... alright! I guess that Aaron Douglas said
      that you are the Raptor expert. What is some of your technical
      knowledge of the Raptor?

      GP: Oh boy the technical knowledge, you want a spiel of it?

      BG2003: Sure.

      GP: I'll give it to you. The Raptor is a reconnaissance platform, in
      other words, it's a carrier-based stealth scout ship, it has
      multiple capabilities, but our main purpose is atmosphere and space
      early warning, and command and control functions for the carrier
      battle group. We provide real time info, we are the eyes and ears of
      the fleet.

      BG2003: Cool!

      GP: Basically it provides reconnaissance information for the
      Battlestar, but we have a lot of additional missions, we do surface
      surveillance coordination, strike and interceptor control, and
      search and rescue guidance.

      BG2003: Well you've got that down!

      GP: [laughs] Yeah there's a lot of stuff. For the crew, there's the
      pilot and then there's the radar platform operator, Helo. I'm the
      pilot, he's my co-pilot.

      BG2003: OK, so you're the pilot and Helo...

      GP: I'm not the expert on all the technology, he's the expert on all
      the radar and stuff. There are some big shoes left to fill.

      BG2003: Yeah.

      GP: We also have reception, analysis, jamming and manipulation
      capabilities of electronic or electromagnetic signals, along with
      laser-torpedo guns, missiles, commo pods, swallows, jiggers, drones,
      and markers.

      BG2003: Wow...you've just got that down...

      GP: I had that ready!

      BG2003: Yeah, they weren't kidding when they said you're the expert.
      [laughs] What would you say is your fondest memory of the filming?
      Do you have like a special memory of like maybe a day or a moment,
      when you were filming this mini, that comes to your mind that you
      will never forget that will always kind of stick with you maybe
      changed you or I don't know, influenced you?

      GP: Oooo, that's tough, cuz I wouldn't trade our bootcamp for
      anything. But from filming, it would have to be the scenes with
      Helo, on Caprica. That was so much fun, everything was fun. I mean,
      just arriving that day, I think it was like 6 in the morning. Seeing
      the Raptor parked out there in the field. "Look at that! That's our
      ship! Its so cool!" And all the crew was out there and everyone from
      the all the extras got there and they were all dirtied up and there
      were like a hundred of them running through this field.

      BG2003: Oh wow...

      GP: ...and all the scenes with Helo and not just how emotional they
      were, but how fun they were, like Baltar was there and him being
      just completely oblivious to everything, and it was so much fun, I
      can't say there was one particular moment. But there were a lot of
      things that were cut out of the miniseries, from the final cut...

      BG2003: I bet that would be interesting to see..

      GP: Yeah we added to some scenes, cause we went to Michael and
      said, "hey we have this great idea," like I wanted to do this scene
      and have Helo give his dog-tags to me.

      BG2003: That was your idea?

      GP: Yeah.

      BG2003: That's great. That's very...

      GP: thought it was cool and then Michael OK'd it, so it could work.
      But it didn't make the final cut that you see, but maybe the
      director's cut, hopefully it will be there.

      BG2003: That would have been nice to see cause that's very touching.

      GP: Yeah, it was heart wrenching.

      BG2003: Oh yeah... that, for us brings back a lot of memories of dog-
      tags and what they mean, you know, to us with war veterans and...
      that would have been really strong.

      GP: It was tough.

      BG2003: Yeah...

      GP: It was tough...but...

      BG2003: Can you describe maybe what it was like to work with Edward
      James Olmos, and Mary McDonnell? I mean these guys, some of these
      veteran actors, did they have any, like, did you have any special,
      memorable moments with them, or any advice that they gave you on
      your career?

      GP: I didn't have individual or one on one scenes with Edward or
      Mary, but, I've heard that Eddie likes to play a lot of practical
      jokes and that you have to watch out for that...

      BG2003: [laughs] Oh, that would be interesting...

      GP: Yeah that would be interesting I know, but him as a man, he is
      just such a presence. He is so generous and he's huge, he has a huge
      heart and you just know that he is standing there, you can feel it.
      And he's just really great. I love him.

      BG2003: Yeah he certainly filled the Adama role out, very well. Very
      well. He really had it down.

      GP: Oh, "So Say We All," that big speech? He basically had a
      monologue at the end, he said "so say we all" and I think he was
      just supposed to say it once. But, he just went on and it wasn't
      scripted but we automatically just started falling in line and we
      looked up to him and we just recited the same thing. And I just felt
      a fire in my chest.

      BG2003: I would never have guessed that wasn't scripted! That was -
      that's phenomenal!

      GP: Oh it was great and he just knew what to do, like exactly how it
      would be in real life, you know? He took the initiative and he had
      the ability to do that. It was amazing

      BG2003: Wow. That was one of the most memorable scenes....

      GP: Yeah...

      BG2003:... in the series, and that was totally improv?

      GP: Oh yeah it was totally him, standing there.

      BG2003: Wow.

      GP: And Mary, she's great. She's fun and she's cool and totally calm
      and I think my first day ever was with her and actually at the time
      I didn't know she was an Academy Award Nominee and I'm kind of glad
      I didn't know that cause I was already so frazzled that day! [laughs]

      BG2003: [Laughs]

      GP: My first day on the set, you know, everyone had died, and they
      don't bring you in easy.

      BG2003: Uh-uh.

      GP: [laughs] She was so great and she's really human and it was
      surprising to know how much she's just like us. During this one
      scene, between takes the director kept coming over to give her notes
      and I think it was like take 8, and when he left she said "oh god I
      suck" and I was "No! You can't say that! Mary, you're a veteran! If
      you say that then what are we supposed to say?"

      BG2003: [laughing]

      GP: [laughs] So it was very cool to know that she was just very real
      and really approachable.

      BG2003: Yes she did an excellent job with her character also. I
      really, really empathized with her character. You know, just
      struggling between her own personal, you know tragedy with the
      breast cancer and then coping with the survival of the human race.

      GP: She was very strong. But it was a feminine strength.

      BG2003: Yes.

      GP: And she doesn't apologize for that.

      BG2003: Yeah, and its something I've kind of noted that she and, her
      character and Adama both have this passion for the survival of
      humanity, but they approach it from such different angles, I mean
      they naturally butt heads because they're so passionate. It's
      interesting.

      GP: Yeah they're kind of like the mother and father figures of the
      fleet...

      BG2003: yeah.

      GP: ... with very individual voices but they came together.

      BG2003: Yeah. Now, really quick, you commented on one of the sneak
      previews of Battlestar Galactica that you found that the new Cylon
      Centurions are - I think this is a quote - "freaking scary"?

      GP: [laughs] Did I say that?

      BG2003: Did you know that the concept artist who created the Cylon
      Centurion, Eric Chu, is apparently a great admirer of yours? Do you
      have a message for him and maybe some of the other behind the scenes
      people who brought the Galactica Universe to life?

      GP: I think it was fuckin' great.

      BG2003: [laughs]

      GP: Can I say that?

      BG2003: [laughs] Well this is the Internet...

      GP: Totally. And I don't really have a particular message. I guess I
      could say something like "keep up the good work" Oh! But you know
      what? I would love to meet them. I think that would be very cool.
      And, sit down and talk and just put our heads together...

      BG2003: Yeah...

      GP: ...and I dunno, shoot the shit.

      BG2003: Yeah [laughing] It sounds like they'd probably like that too.

      GP: Yeah. Totally.

      BG2003: Well you have so much technical knowledge on the Raptor, you
      guys could talk for hours! [laughing]

      GP: [laughs] I'd like to take flying lessons but it says in my
      contract that I'm not allowed to.

      BG2003: Oh you're not? Because of the danger, probably.

      GP: Yeah and I'm not even allowed to go skiing or anything.

      BG2003: You're gonna be jealous but I went up with the Blue Angels
      once.

      GP: Oh you did?

      BG2003: Yeah.

      GP: How? Do you fly?

      BG2003: Yeah, well, I did a story on them and, one of the stories I
      did at one of the air- fairs and I went up with them, in an F-18.

      GP: Oh neat. That was fun! [laughs]

      BG2003: Let me tell you... because it meant a lot to me, being an
      old-time Battlestar Galactica fan when I was a kid, watching the
      Vipers take off and thought "that would be so cool" and then I went
      in an F-18. Wow! It was cool! [laughs]

      GP: That's totally neat. I'd love to do that.

      BG2003: You might get to some day. You never know, I mean, you get
      to be an actress and you get well known and there will be
      opportunities that come your way. And that's wonderful. Well, how
      would you describe what it was like to work with director Michael
      Rymer?

      GP: Oh, he's awesome! He's the best! You know, he told me that he
      took two years of Meisner, which is an acting technique.<br/><br/>(Message over 64 KB, truncated)
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