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[MUSIC] Patricia Kao & A-Yue/Chang Cheng Yue

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  • madchinaman
    PATRICIA KAO / HOUSE OF BLUES http://www.broward.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/music/9826991.ht m ``What I love about the name of this tour, `Kill Kitty,
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 5 7:10 PM
      PATRICIA KAO / HOUSE OF BLUES
      http://www.broward.com/mld/mercurynews/entertainment/music/9826991.ht
      m
      ``What I love about the name of this tour, `Kill Kitty,' is it's
      symbolically killing the cutesy side of Asian pop culture,'' says
      Patricia Kao, vice president of planning at the House of Blues, who
      has been instrumental in getting A-Yue to tour in the United States.


      -

      Patricia Kao: Patricia graduated from Stanford University in 1993
      with a degree in Economics. Patty spent over four years at SCA
      Consulting, a boutique consulting firm in Los Angeles, where she
      started as a Business Analyst and then became an Associate. (SCA has
      since been acquired by Mercer Consulting.) Patty currently heads the
      Business Planning department for House of Blues Entertainment, a
      music company headquartered in Hollywood.

      -


      Working on the business side, Kao, a second-generation Chinese-
      American, doesn't often get to deal directly with artists, but she
      saw A-Yue as an opportunity to help battle stereotypes.

      ``It's scary and it's risky'' to bring a non-English-language act to
      a new audience, says Kao, ``but I think it's about time.

      ``It's really proving that Asian music is legitimate, and is made up
      of not just the stereotypical cheesy pop ballads and boy bands''
      that are popular in Asia, says Kao, who co-wrote the book ``Vault
      Guide to Conquering Corporate America for Women and Minorities.''

      She adds: ``There is certainly an appetite for Asian music.''

      Two years ago A-Yue and his manager, George Trivino, approached the
      House of Blues to ``show people we can rock,'' says Trivino, who is
      Chinese-Italian. They wanted a venue with status, but after
      explaining that A-Yue sings only in Mandarin, Trivino recalls them
      saying something like, ``You must be out of your mind -- this is the
      House of Blues here, not a street-corner pub.''

      Besides the word ``bye'' and the name of his band, ``Free9,'' there
      are only five English words on ``Useless Guy,'' A-Yue's latest
      album: ``I want to get high.''

      On top of that, a month before the concert started, Trivino was
      still figuring out how to market his star, whose name would be
      difficult for Americans to pronounce. Should it be (a) Chang (b)
      C.Y. or (c) A-Yue?

      All the work paid off last December, when the rocker got a shot to
      play one night at the House of Blues in Los Angeles. It sold out
      three weeks before the show, and wowed the management there enough
      to sign A-Yue on for a national tour.

      ``At the end of the day, everybody realizes that this is a part of
      history in the making,'' says the House of Blues' Kao. ``The big
      question is `Can we pull it off?' ''

      Making inroads in U.S.

      Success still seems a long ways off.

      Even though A-Yue is a regular in Taiwanese media because of this
      upcoming tour, ``no one's fooled into thinking this is his break
      into the U.S. market,'' says Max Woodworth, a reporter for the
      Taipei Times, in an e-mail.

      But ``any time a Taiwanese performer can attain a modicum of
      notoriety in the U.S., or anywhere outside the Chinese-speaking
      world,'' he said, ``it's cause for tremendous pride here.''

      It's safe to say that A-Yue has a fan base in the Bay Area. While
      visiting San Francisco's Union Square recently, Trivino and A-Yue
      had to run from fans who recognized the star. They would stop at one
      corner to check out girls, get mobbed to sign autographs, and run
      away, only to start the process again.

      ``It's rare for us to see . . . Taiwanese singers in the U.S.,''
      says Liu, the Stanford Taiwanese Student Association president. Liu
      is planning to pool members of the group to go to the concert.

      A-Yue is philosophical about his upcoming opportunity. ``I feel like
      music is the world's language. House of Blues is a good venue, and
      everyone will notice. Plus, I believe one's sight should not be
      limited to Taiwan or in Asia, but it must be expanded.''

      ============

      Vault Guide to Conquering Corporate America for Women and Minorities
      http://careerguides.vault.com/store/preview.cfm?
      id=240&product_id=24293


      Every year, many new college and professional school grads get their
      first jobs as entry-level employees in Corporate America. The client
      service industries in particular -- management consulting,
      investment banking, law and accounting -- employ a new army of young
      worker bees every fall season. Lured by the opportunity to make a
      great deal of money and gain a broad education in the business
      world, recent grads often enter the corporate environment with no
      understanding of the written and unwritten rules of Corporate
      America to guide their behavior. They simply expect their new
      employers to train them completely.

      We wrote this book for the benefit of those with little practical
      experience with the inner workings of the corporate world. The
      advice we offer comes from our personal experience and those of our
      friends and colleagues. We are presenting everything we wish we had
      known our first day on the job, but didn't. We had little exposure
      to the corporate world -- our parents were academics, small business
      owners, and immigrants to boot. We scrambled to get up to speed,
      made a lot of painful mistakes doing it and envied our peers who
      seemed so much more comfortable in the same environment.

      =========

      Excerpt from the Guide

      Mentors and other contacts are invaluable aids in your struggle to
      thrive in the corporate world. A mentor can guide you, defend you,
      and develop you. Your personal networks also provide support and
      knowledge beyond your immediate office. They can get your foot in
      the door for a great opportunity, and help you overcome obstacles in
      getting a job, promotion or career change. A study by Catalyst, a
      group that studies women in the corporate world, tracked 368 women
      and minorities from 1998 through 2001, and showed strong correlation
      between promotions and being mentored.
      Mentors Mentors have several uses. They give you objective advice
      regarding how to develop your professional skills or career path.
      They give you the inside scoop on how to deal with your company
      culture, co-workers or specific professional situations you
      confront. They are seasoned scouts, guiding you and lighting your
      path through the wilderness of the corporate world.

      It takes patience and time to develop mentorships. In particular, it
      can take a little extra time to get to know someone who is older or
      in a different stage in life than you. Think about your college
      experience. The people who got to know professors in order to get
      plum research projects and glowing recommendations for graduate
      schools were always the "geeks" who went to office hours and raised
      their hands in class. A professor would never just suddenly knock on
      your dorm room door and tell you she wanted to take you under her
      wing. Well, getting a mentor in the work world is going to require
      the same deliberate effort on your part.

      Identifying potential mentors

      Mentors can be found inside or outside your company. Look around
      your department, your company, and the professional business
      organizations to which you belong. Identify people you really admire
      with whom you cross paths both inside and outside the office. Don't
      limit yourself to obvious choices (e.g., the most popular/powerful
      executive, the person who had your job before you, the person of the
      same race or gender as you). Any impressive, intelligent, and
      insightful person you meet can evolve into a future mentor.

      Mentors within the company can help champion or cultivate you. In
      your company, mentors know all the players, politics, and pitfalls.
      Ideally, they are well-respected and secure in their positions. They
      may be a few rungs up the corporate ladder and can help you
      understand different managers' personalities and preferred working
      styles, office politics, and the lessons they have learned.

      Mentors outside of work provide objectivity. Choose mentors outside
      of your office who know your personality and have wisdom from a wide
      range of experiences. Develop relationships with at least one or two
      people who have no impact on your career to whom you can openly
      vent, turn to for perspective and ask for receive candid feedback.
      You will appreciate their distance when a work issue is too
      controversial to discuss with a fellow colleague, even in
      confidence.

      In many cases, you may not even need a personal relationship with
      these people in order to learn from them. Observe their traits from
      a distance, and emulate them when you get in a position of power.
      For example, one director at Oracle recalls that he admired a
      manager who recognized hard work by comping them expensive dinners
      and hotel rooms. Such practice bred great loyalty, which this
      director is now implementing.

      Tips for building a relationship with a potential mentor
      Kristi Anderson, Executive Recruiter, TMP Worldwide

      "Show overwhelming interest in their kids! Pretend you like their
      kids, remember their names, and ask about them often. Remembering to
      ask who won that high school football game will go a million miles
      in endearing yourself to a potential mentor.

      How to Get a Mentor
      Mary Cranston, Chair of law firm Pillsbury Winthrop LLP

      Mary is the chairperson of one of the largest law firms in America.
      She has been practicing law since 1975, and has litigated over 300
      class action in state and federal court, focusing on antitrust
      counseling and litigation, and securities litigation. She has been
      named to the National Law Journal's list of the 100 Most Influential
      Lawyers in America, and California Daily Journal's list of The 100
      Most Influential Lawyers in California.

      Her advice on how to get a mentor: "Be a good mentee. Approach
      individuals who have skills you want to acquire. If you just
      say, 'Help me,' they will be less likely to help. But if you say, 'I
      had a great idea; can we work on it together?' your chances are much
      higher. Think about how you can contribute to the relationship.
      You're more likely to get help from a mentor."


      About the Author(s)

      Patricia Kao: Patricia graduated from Stanford University in 1993
      with a degree in Economics. Patty spent over four years at SCA
      Consulting, a boutique consulting firm in Los Angeles, where she
      started as a Business Analyst and then became an Associate. (SCA has
      since been acquired by Mercer Consulting.) Patty currently heads the
      Business Planning department for House of Blues Entertainment, a
      music company headquartered in Hollywood.

      Susan Tien: Susan graduated from Harvard College in 1993 with an
      A.B. in Organizational Psychology, and from University of
      Pennsylvania Law School in 1996 with a J.D. During the Internet
      boom, she worked at one of Silicon Valley's largest law firms,
      Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati. She next went in-house as
      corporate counsel to various high tech companies including Exodus
      Communications, eBay, and Silicon Graphics, Inc., where she
      currently works.

      Contact them at pattyandsusan@...
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