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[POLITICS] Mike Honda is the DNC Deputy Chair

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  • madchinaman
    DNC Chairman McAuliffe Appoints U.S. Rep. Mike Honda as DNC Deputy Chair http://www.democrats.org/apia/news/200310310002.html More Asian Pacific Islander
    Message 1 of 1 , Nov 2 4:23 PM
      DNC Chairman McAuliffe Appoints U.S. Rep. Mike Honda as DNC Deputy
      Chair
      http://www.democrats.org/apia/news/200310310002.html

      More Asian Pacific Islander Americans (APIAs) are in positions of
      leadership in the Democratic Party than ever before. California
      Congressman Bob Matsui is the Chair of the Democratic Congressional
      Campaign Committee and Washington Governor Gary Locke is the Chair
      of the Democratic Governors' Association.

      Most recently, Congressman Honda was appointed by DNC Chairman Terry
      McAuliffe to be the Deputy Chair of the Democratic National
      Committee. "Congressman Honda is a great asset to the DNC,"
      McAuliffe said. "He will be instrumental in reaching out to all
      voters, particularly the Asian American community nationwide."

      U.S. Rep. Mike Honda represents California's 15th district, a
      diverse district containing the largest Asian Pacific American
      population of any congressional district in the continental U.S.
      Born in California, Honda spent his early childhood with his family
      in an internment camp in Colorado during World War II. "I am proud
      to have joined the diverse leadership team at the Democratic
      National Committee. The Bush Administration has failed the APIA
      community on so many issues, and we need to demand action and
      accountability. I look forward to working with the DNC to help APIAs
      become more politically involved," said Honda.



      -----------



      DNC APIA Caucus Enthusiastic About 2004

      For years, Keith Umemoto has been actively encouraging Asian Pacific
      Islander Americans to vote. As the Chair of the Democratic National
      Committee's APIA Caucus, he spoke to us recently about the
      importance of APIA activism in the upcoming presidential elections.


      Q: How will 2004 be politically different for Asian Pacific Islander
      Americans?

      A: APIAs are the fastest growing group in America, and we continue
      to grow, with numbers exceeding 12.5 million. Many congressional
      districts and the entire state of California are majority-minority
      areas. This means that APIAs and other minority populations will
      have more say in who gets elected. The expansion of the APIA
      population into the suburbs has increased the number of elections
      where APIAs will play a vital role.


      Q: How do you think Asian Pacific Islander Americans perceive the
      current political climate?

      A: I think that the majority of APIAs realize that President Bush's
      policies are not working for them. Under his Administration, racial
      profiling under the guise of national security has skyrocketed.
      There remains an urgent need for stronger federal legislation
      addressing the continuing problem with hate crimes and inconsistent
      reporting of these crimes, which continue to harm Asian Pacific
      Islander Americans. In addition, APIAs healthcare needs are being
      overlooked - one in five Asian Pacific Islander Americans is
      uninsured or have been some time in the last year. The uninsured
      rate for Korean and Vietnamese Americans is even higher.


      Q: How can APIAs increase their involvement with politics?

      A: Well, there are many ways that APIAs can get involved. First,
      everyone has to register to vote. Register yourself, your friends,
      your mom, dad, grandma, pastor, hairdresser....everyone! Only 53% of
      eligible APIAs are currently registered to vote. That must change.
      Also, find out about the issues. Volunteer for local campaigns --
      introduce the candidates and your local party to the APIA
      neighborhoods and encourage them to campaign there. And another fun
      way to get involved is to run for a Convention delegate spot. Every
      state will send people to the Democratic National Convention in July
      2004. You can contact your state party or the DNC APIA Outreach
      Office for information on how to run.
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