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[LITERATURE] Mabel Cheung and Alex Law's "Jackie Chan: Traces of a Dragon"

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  • madchinaman
    Mabel Cheung & Alex Law : Tracing Jackie Chan s Family Mabel Cheung and Alex Law are long-time movie partners, sharing writing, producing and directing chores.
    Message 1 of 1 , Feb 14, 2003
      Mabel Cheung & Alex Law : Tracing Jackie Chan's Family

      Mabel Cheung and Alex Law are long-time movie partners, sharing
      writing, producing and directing chores. Their collaboration has
      given us such hit films as An Autumn's Tale and The Soong Sisters.
      In Jackie Chan: Traces of a Dragon, they recorded the revelations of
      Jackie Chan's parents, accounting for a life of danger, hardships
      and emigration which Jackie Chan himself knew little about.
      Filmfestivals.com met the dynamic duo to talk further about their
      fascinating discoveries...

      Could you tell me about the very birth of the project which seems to
      date back to 1999?

      Yes. Back in 1999 at the time of Chinese New Year, Jackie Chan came
      to us and said: "Would you like to go to my home in Australia to
      visit my father, because my father is prepared to tell me family
      secrets..." There had been rumours circulating around that Jackie
      was not his father's biological son. And that he had other siblings
      in China, and that his surname was not even "Chan". So we were
      intrigued and said: "Why not?"

      Vacation with Jackie Chan in Australia would be great fun! So we
      went to Jackie's home with him to record the whole procedure of his
      father telling him the secret of his family. Jackie himself had
      never heard this story before. It was the very first time for him.

      Alex Law : He heard the same thing for the first time along with the
      two of us. He heard many things for the first time. That is why
      sometimes you can see tears in his eyes when he heard about how his
      mother suffered, how his two brothers became beggars in China, those
      sort of things. He was very moved himself.

      Mabel Cheung: I think that's a very good thing that he heard those
      stories for the first time himself. So we could capture his true
      emotions. I put him always there, besides his father, to catch his
      reactions, because I knew it was also his first time listening to
      these stories. So we tried to capture his true emotions as the
      stories unfolded. Which is a very good thing, because you can see,
      sometimes he's surprised, sometimes he's touched. You
      can also see sense the father/son relationship. To Hong Kong
      audiences, Jackie Chan is a big hero. A very tough guy. But to his
      father, he's just a little boy. So his attitude when he is with his
      father is completely different. He's like a little boy wandering in
      his father's stories. And sometimes his father would say: "You silly
      boy!" (Laughs) Very authoritative! So you can see a different side
      of Jackie Chan, a side which people have never seen before. (Smiles)

      As you said, you discovered many things, many secrets?

      Mabel Cheung: The most surprising thing was to discover that his
      mother was not a simple housewife. Because we had known his mother
      for some time and always thought that she was a soft-spoken, gentle
      housewife. But then, we discovered later that she had been an opium
      smuggler, and that under the nickname of "Third Sister" she had
      roamed the underworld all by herself! (Laughs) Also, that his father
      had been a spy for the Nationalist party under Chiang Kai-shek. That
      was also a shock. His father was not really
      willing to reveal that part of himself, actually. I found out the
      truth from his other sisters. So then he said : "Well, if you know
      about it, then I will tell you!" (Laughs)

      Did Jackie's father have true political convictions, or rather, was
      he, as he called himself, a "hood, a henchman"?

      Mabel Cheung: Jackie's father is more like a happy-go-lucky kind of
      man. He's very open, funny, friendly, but then he has this harsh
      appearance which makes people somewhat scared of him when they don't
      know him well. But after a few drinks, he's OK, he can talk very
      freely. I suppose, although he has suffered a lot in the past, he
      has enjoyed life in a way, lived life to the fullest.

      Alex Law : He was never a political man. I think he joined the
      Nationalist party only by circumstances. But most people joined the
      Nationalists at that time, more than the Communists. And then, after
      he became a Nationalist, he eventually took side. But then, the
      Communists became bigger and bigger, and he had to leave China. But
      I don't think he took sides from the start. He was not politicized.

      Mabel Cheung: He was just making a living! (Laughs)

      Alex Law : Yes! (Laughs) He started off as a hooligan, a hitman, and
      if you joined the Nationalists, you could become a hitman with a
      licence. So he thought: "Why not?"

      Mabel Cheung: He always liked guns! (Laughs) Carrying a gun made him
      feel more important.

      You show in the film images of violence, whether bombardments,
      executions, decapitations... I would like to know how the use of
      that kind of images became instrumental to making this film?

      Mabel Cheung : I had seen many documentaries about modern Chinese
      history for the making of The Soong Sisters. I have seen a lot of
      violent things that happened during the war and the cultural
      revolution. And those images stuck in my mind. So as soon as I
      listened to the stories of Jackie Chan's father and his two
      brothers, these images came to mind and I thought: "This is a good
      way to intercut the stories of Jackie Chan's family with those
      images, to illustrate the point." It was more interesting to
      intercut with actual historical footage than have those people just
      talking.

      Alex Law: In any case, I think that in the mid-thirties and forties,
      life was very violent. People just died every day, on battle fronts,
      in the streets...

      Mabel Cheung: Life was cheap then. You just executed people in the
      streets. During the cultural revolution, people got killed for
      various reasons. Sons and daughters betrayed parents. That was very
      common in China.

      What kind of research did you do to find the actual footage you
      needed?

      Mabel Cheung: We went to China first, but then in China, the filing
      system of newsreels was not too good so we had to look through all
      the rolls of film to find exactly what we wanted. And also, they
      censored some of the footage. So the executions in the streets, for
      example, they cut at the point of the gunshot. So we had to find
      those images elsewhere, and we sent people looking for the footage
      in England and the USA. And they sent that
      footage back to Hong Kong for us to screen. So it was a very long
      process, over a year, back and forth, finding the things we really
      wanted.

      Was there the idea also, through the making of such a film, of
      reuniting on film a family that had been scattered by the course of
      history?

      Mabel Cheung: Yes, all the more so as the health of Jackie's mother
      was a great concern. Jackie was afraid and wanted to record
      everything before something happened to his parents. His father is
      already 87 years-old. So he wanted to record everything before
      anything happened. And it was a good thing because his mother died
      last year after filming. So it's a good souvenir for the whole
      family. Reunification of Chinese families is a big thing, a big
      issue. Every single family has some members left in China or Taiwan.
      So this question of reunification has been on our minds for a long
      time, in every Chinese family.

      Alex Law: Family reunion is a big thing in China. We always get
      together, for dinners, festivals, for the New Year. So I'm hoping
      also that this film will bring all families back together, that it
      will help families reunite all over China.

      Mabel Cheung: Wherever they are... (Smiles)

      Robin Gatto
      Jackie Chan : Traces Of A Dragon


      =========================

      http://www.time.com/time/asia/asia/magazine/1998/981019/cover4.html

      He has come back to America, in triumph, at the same time his
      autobiography traces a painful trip back to his youth--to birth and
      before. Because he legendarily spent nearly a year in his mother's
      womb, Charles and Lee-lee Chan's only child, Kong-sang, was
      nicknamed Pao-pao--Cantonese for cannonball, but also a sound effect
      from any Jackie Chan movie fight. Charles was a cook for a French
      diplomat in Hong Kong, and the family lived in a mansion on Victoria
      Peak. Not until Jackie was an adult did he learn that Charles had
      been married previously, had sired three sons and had lost his first
      family during the Japanese occupation of China. In Shandong he met
      Lee-lee, who had lost her spouse, and smuggled her out of the
      country to Hong Kong.

      Lee-lee gave her son unconditional love; Charles pounded physical
      discipline into the boy's body. At seven he was placed in the China
      Drama Academy, a Peking Opera school run by Master Yu Jim-yuen. If
      one judges a school by its graduates, then this was Harvard, Oxford
      and the Sorbonne. In Jackie's class were at least a half-dozen
      future shapers of Hong Kong action cinema: Samo Hung, the tubby
      terror who starred with Jackie in 15 films, directed him in eight
      and is now the lead in Martial Law, a new hit series on American TV;
      cute, lithe Yuen Biao, another frequent Chan-Hung co-star; and comic
      villain extraordinaire Yuen Wah.

      Out of respect for their old master, many of his students took his
      name. Jackie, known in school as Yuen Lo, did no such thing. At 17
      he left the Academy to work in movies, yet the master haunts him
      still. This is the man who introduced Jackie to "that grand altar of
      communion between player and audience: center stage." This is the
      ghost he still needs to please and appease. "Charles Chan was the
      father of Chan Kong-sang," he writes, "but Yu Jim-yuen was the
      father of Jackie Chan." And at the end of the book, an
      invocation: "I hated you. I feared you. I love you, Master."

      Kong-sang's parents had emigrated to Australia while he was at
      school. For a while, in his early 20s, he joined them, and picked up
      his English nickname on a construction site in Canberra; his Chinese
      screen name, Sing Lung ("already a dragon," a reference to his
      ambition to succeed dead superstar Bruce Lee, of Enter the Dragon
      fame) came from his longtime manager, wily Willie Chan. Jackie
      served a frustrating film apprenticeship with Lo Wei, who had
      directed Lee in Fist of Fury and tried to make Jackie a sullen
      carbon copy of Lee. It was not until he teamed with Yuen Woo-ping on
      the 1978 hits Snake in Eagle's Shadow and Drunken Master that Jackie
      located his screen personality: the modest, smiling man of the
      people. He still is.

      The book displays a more complicated fellow: one who reacted to his
      first stardom with too much swagger and a retinue of burly
      parasites. That Jackie was no apt suitor for Teresa Teng. "I loved
      her," he writes, "but I loved myself more. And no heart can ever
      serve two masters." (Teng died of asthma, at 43, in 1995.) Even
      today, the older, wiser Jackie knows who's boss. "I spent two-thirds
      of my time abroad," he says in the book, "and even when I'm in Hong
      Kong, my schedule is so full that I can barely find time to be with
      my wife and child." The man is a workaholic; career comes first. "I
      think each year: this will be the year I slow down to enjoy the
      important things in life. Some year. Sometime soon."

      Rush Hour, a buddy picture that marks Chan's first starring role in
      a big American production, earned $33 million in its first week--as
      much as Rumble did in its entire theatrical release. And unlike most
      action films, which grab gaudy box office numbers the first weekend
      but quickly exhaust their young-male audience base, this one has
      kept finding new fans. In its first 17 days it amassed a fat $84
      million; that's a bigger take than the latest film of Robert Redford
      or Harrison Ford or John Travolta. By the time you read this, Rush
      Hour should have hit the $100 million mark in North America alone.
      The film's success astonishes and embarrasses Hollywood executives,
      many of whom said no thanks to an action film pairing Chan with
      Chris Tucker, an agreeably yelping black actor-comedian. Disney
      could have had Rush Hour; that's the studio that Roger Birnbaum, the
      film's executive producer, calls home. He had to go to New Line
      Cinema, which had distributed most of Chan's recent films. It's one
      of those happy Hollywood tales: the picture no one wanted to make,
      with the Asian star Hollywood had nearly discarded, strikes a chord
      and strikes it rich. "Jackie," says New Line chief Robert
      Shaye, "was a class act waiting to happen. There's always been a
      market for charming, ingenuous action stars. From the first time I
      saw his movies, I knew he could succeed here if he were cast
      appropriately in a film that was really designed for an English-
      speaking action audience."

      To give Western audiences a fuller view of their new hero, Chan has
      just issued his autobiography, I Am Jackie Chan: My Life in Action
      (Ballantine Books). Written with verve and narrative skill by Jeff
      Yang, the Los Angeles-based publisher of A., an Asian-American life-
      style magazine, the book is as funny, brisk and exciting as any
      Jackie movie, with the surprise of poignancy. Here he talks for the
      first time about his father's turbulent life in old Shanghai, about
      the cruel but inspiring martial-arts master whose school Jackie
      attended as a boy, about his bittersweet love affair with pop star
      Teresa Teng Lai-kwan and his secret, 15-year marriage to Taiwan
      actress Lin Feng-jiao. The book manages to be brutally revealing and
      consistently charming--Jackie is beating himself up, just to
      entertain you.

      The author is a movie star first; he must be thrilled by Rush Hour's
      popularity, right? You would think that. But listen. "All those
      years in Asia, all my life, every movie I made, the one moment I
      waited for was the opening," he says, punctuating his thoughts and
      acting out his feelings as if every sentence were the climactic
      fight scene from Drunken Master II. "Bang! Yeah! Success! O.K.!
      Then, go on to something else. I waited 15 years to become a success
      in America. Now Rush Hour is a hit, and there's a lot of happy news.
      People keep calling up and congratulating me. But I say what I
      always say: 'Wow! Finished. What's next?'"

      Why is the chronically energetic, typically optimistic Chan speaking
      with skepticism? Perhaps he is hedging. It's possible that Rush Hour
      is a fluke, albeit a gloriously profitable one, and that Jackie
      could soon be back where he was: movie king of the Pacific Rim.
      Perhaps also he is reluctant to give lavish credit to a film that he
      did not totally control. "In America there is no way I can make the
      kind of movie I like to make," Chan says. In Hollywood, even now,
      the king is only an ambassador.

      But an ambassador for a zesty form of popular filmmaking--the Hong
      Kong action movie--which Rush Hour imitates and approximates with
      plenty of dash. In the script by Ross LaManna and Jim Kouf, Chan
      plays Lee, a Hong Kong detective fighting corruption and drug
      dealing in the colony at the time of its handover to China. One of
      his friends, a diplomat, is leaving for Los Angeles and taking his
      young daughter Soo Yung (Julia Hsu), who is studying martial arts
      under Lee's supervision. He already misses them both. "Will you
      practice your kicks and eye gouges?" he fondly asks the cute kid.
      (You know those moves will be useful in the U.S.) Soon after her
      arrival, the child is kidnapped, and Lee comes to America to help
      with the investigation. The FBI, deeming Lee a nuisance, teams him
      with James Carter (Tucker), a mouthy L.A. cop who gets on everyone's
      nerves. They hate each other and are totally opposite. In other
      words, they are the typical odd-couple.
      Brett Ratner, who directed Tucker in the 1997 comedy Money Talks,
      mounts the caper smartly; the kidnapping scene is a model mix of
      suspense, comedy (the kid puts up a good fight) and technical
      facility. Ratner also stirs a good rapport between the stars: Chris
      all flailing sass, Jackie the image of stalwart exasperation--when
      he's not talking down and dirty to Tucker's black friends, or
      grunting along with the old Edwin Starr anthem War: "Huh! Yeah!"
      Does the film stoop to racial stereotype? Yes, as many Hong Kong
      action films do: broadly and without malice. "He's he and I'm me,"
      says Tucker of Chan. "He's a real cool person, and he trusted me, so
      it all worked out, the comedy and the karate together."

      The stars also worked out together. "I did like 300 sit-ups," Tucker
      insists, with a roguish laugh, "and I think Jackie stopped at about
      50." Chan thinks that Tucker's rapid street banter, a key to Rush
      Hour's U.S. success, is a reason the film confounds some Asian
      audiences. "At the premiere in Taiwan," he says, "they just sit
      like"--and he puts on the stone face of incomprehension and
      displeasure. "They cannot catch the American jokes. Even the
      translators can't keep up. After 10 minutes, they just put a
      subtitle: 'How are you?'"

      What lifts Rush Hour above Chan's earlier stabs at American
      assimilation is that it lets Jackie do his uniquely nimble stunt
      magic with minimum interference. Ratner knows that, for Jackie,
      there's no building ledge too high, no comedy too low. In one funny
      fight, he must kick beaucoup butt while keeping precious vases from
      toppling and breaking. Some of the stunt gags are filched from
      Jackie's own 1985 Police Story (he jumps onto a double-decker bus,
      he dangles from the top of a mall space), but, if you're going to
      steal, why not from the best? In the most graceful piece, Jackie
      hangs from a Hollywood Boulevard street sign, then drops onto a
      truck, rolls off and slips into and out of a jitney, slides across
      the top of a taxi and in through the back seat window--all in 15
      seconds.

      Chan not only choreographed the stunt, he chose the street
      sign. "The director had me hanging off a Sunset Boulevard sign," he
      recalls, "and I asked him if I could change it to a Hollywood sign.
      That sign has meaning to the Chinese. It's like I grab Hollywood. If
      the movie opened at only $1 million in the U.S., I would have let
      go. But now I'm happy. It says: Hollywood, I've come back."

      He has come back to America, in triumph, at the same time his
      autobiography traces a painful trip back to his youth--to birth and
      before. Because he legendarily spent nearly a year in his mother's
      womb, Charles and Lee-lee Chan's only child, Kong-sang, was
      nicknamed Pao-pao--Cantonese for cannonball, but also a sound effect
      from any Jackie Chan movie fight. Charles was a cook for a French
      diplomat in Hong Kong, and the family lived in a mansion on Victoria
      Peak. Not until Jackie was an adult did he learn that Charles had
      been married previously, had sired three sons and had lost his first
      family during the Japanese occupation of China. In Shandong he met
      Lee-lee, who had lost her spouse, and smuggled her out of the
      country to Hong Kong.
      Lee-lee gave her son unconditional love; Charles pounded physical
      discipline into the boy's body. At seven he was placed in the China
      Drama Academy, a Peking Opera school run by Master Yu Jim-yuen. If
      one judges a school by its graduates, then this was Harvard, Oxford
      and the Sorbonne. In Jackie's class were at least a half-dozen
      future shapers of Hong Kong action cinema: Samo Hung, the tubby
      terror who starred with Jackie in 15 films, directed him in eight
      and is now the lead in Martial Law, a new hit series on American TV;
      cute, lithe Yuen Biao, another frequent Chan-Hung co-star; and comic
      villain extraordinaire Yuen Wah.

      Out of respect for their old master, many of his students took his
      name. Jackie, known in school as Yuen Lo, did no such thing. At 17
      he left the Academy to work in movies, yet the master haunts him
      still. This is the man who introduced Jackie to "that grand altar of
      communion between player and audience: center stage." This is the
      ghost he still needs to please and appease. "Charles Chan was the
      father of Chan Kong-sang," he writes, "but Yu Jim-yuen was the
      father of Jackie Chan." And at the end of the book, an
      invocation: "I hated you. I feared you. I love you, Master."

      Kong-sang's parents had emigrated to Australia while he was at
      school. For a while, in his early 20s, he joined them, and picked up
      his English nickname on a construction site in Canberra; his Chinese
      screen name, Sing Lung ("already a dragon," a reference to his
      ambition to succeed dead superstar Bruce Lee, of Enter the Dragon
      fame) came from his longtime manager, wily Willie Chan. Jackie
      served a frustrating film apprenticeship with Lo Wei, who had
      directed Lee in Fist of Fury and tried to make Jackie a sullen
      carbon copy of Lee. It was not until he teamed with Yuen Woo-ping on
      the 1978 hits Snake in Eagle's Shadow and Drunken Master that Jackie
      located his screen personality: the modest, smiling man of the
      people. He still is.

      The book displays a more complicated fellow: one who reacted to his
      first stardom with too much swagger and a retinue of burly
      parasites. That Jackie was no apt suitor for Teresa Teng. "I loved
      her," he writes, "but I loved myself more. And no heart can ever
      serve two masters." (Teng died of asthma, at 43, in 1995.) Even
      today, the older, wiser Jackie knows who's boss. "I spent two-thirds
      of my time abroad," he says in the book, "and even when I'm in Hong
      Kong, my schedule is so full that I can barely find time to be with
      my wife and child." The man is a workaholic; career comes first. "I
      think each year: this will be the year I slow down to enjoy the
      important things in life. Some year. Sometime soon."

      He can enjoy his new American eminence in the silly, thrilly Rush
      Hour--"the movie to me is like a toy," he says--and start planning
      the inevitable follow-up. "The last scene of Rush Hour has Chris
      Tucker and me on the airplane, headed for Asia," Chan notes. "We
      said, 'If the movie opens at $30 million, we'll land in Hong Kong.
      If it opens at $1 million, then let's say there was a plane
      explosion. No more sequel.' So yes, there is a sequel."
      In this whirlwind, can he push the "important things in life" from
      his mind? That Rush Hour subplot of the kidnapped child must
      resonate in Chan. In the days when he denied he had a wife and son
      (with good cause: one Japanese fan threw herself in front of a
      subway train after reading a rumor of the marriage), Jackie's
      stuntman friends would take the boy out for a walk. "One day he saw
      a poster with my face," Chan recalls, "and started uttering, 'Dad!'
      And the stuntmen grabbed him away. Later they told me this, and I
      cried." And when the boy was 12 or 13, his father warned him about
      kidnappers. "Then my son said, 'Don't worry, I'll never tell people
      that you are my father.' Wow! I just sighed."

      In public, Jackie just smiles. His still-boyish energy and
      relentless charm are a tonic in this glum, sordid age. He is
      unfailingly gracious to the press, fans and colleagues. Bob Shaye of
      New Line cites a dinner party Chan threw at a Los Angeles restaurant
      after the opening of Rush Hour. "He invited 40 people--agents,
      friends of his, company executives--for a Chinese banquet. He helped
      serve the food, and got up to talk to people like a real host. He's
      a terrific guy--a Chinese mensch."

      He is considering other Hollywood projects, with titles like Strike
      Out, Escape, West West. "All action," he says. "New for American
      audiences. For me, I'm a bit bored already." Just like his stardom.
      After all, he has been Jackie Chan, superstar, for two decades; and
      smacking his head against the Hollywood wall all those years
      hardened him against emotional vertigo when he finally hit the
      heights there. So instead of moving to L.A., as Samo and Michelle
      and Chow Yun-fat have done, Chan wants to make his next film in Hong
      Kong. And describing this, he feels the excitement of the artist-
      salesman: "A love story. First Jackie Chan movie love story!
      Everyone in Asia will say, 'Yes! We are going to see it!'"

      Nice career move, Jackie. And who will be his co-star? Maybe Lin
      Feng-jiao? At least, then, Mrs. Jackie Chan could get to spend some
      time with her husband.

      There we go, trying to slap a Hollywood ending onto a very Asian
      marital arrangement. What Chan and his wife do is their business.
      But what Jackie has, at this moment in a spectacular career, is
      exactly what he wants: a happy middle. An American hit. The faithful
      adoration of his Asian fans. And his own renewed enthusiasm to keep
      fighting, loving, filming.

      Reported by Isabella Ng and Stephen Short/Hong Kong and Jeffrey
      Ressner/Los Angeles


      ================

      OCTOBER 19, 1998 VOL. 152 NO. 15
      http://www.time.com/time/asia/asia/magazine/1998/981019/cover_intervi
      ew1.html

      Chan: "If I Break My Ankle, Click, I Just Snap It Back"
      TIME: You've waited a long time for a hit like this in the U.S.
      Chan: Am I surprised? Yes and no. People say I should stay in
      Hollywood. But Rush Hour's success lets me come back to Hong Kong
      and make an Asian film. In America, there is no way I can make the
      kind of movie I like: love stories, dramas.

      TIME: Are you worried that people in the industry see you as simply
      an action hero?
      Chan: No. In the American market, people think of Jackie Chan as the
      new action star. I am really an old action star. In Asia, everybody
      knows me already. Rush Hour was 100% for the American market. I went
      to the premiere in Taiwan. When I say [in the movie], "What's up,
      nigger?" nobody smiles. There are some American VIPs there, and they
      laugh. The audience thinks they're crazy. Why? They just cannot
      catch the dialogue, especially Chris Tucker
      speaking: "BlaaaaaaaBluuuuuuu." Even the translators can't keep up.
      After 10 minutes, they just put a subtitle: "How are you?"

      TIME: What were the toughest scenes for you?
      Chan: The most difficult thing was the dialogue. For a start, Chris
      Tucker, he's crazy! The first time I meet him, I open the door, "Ah,
      Chris Tucker!" and he says, "Ah, Jackie Chan!" And 15 minutes later
      I don't even know what he's talking about. I have a dialogue coach
      every day to practice. So they put the camera on and say, "O.K.,
      shooting." But the dialogue is not the same as in the script. Chris
      Tucker would start to ad lib, and I'd end up saying, "Hey, where's
      my dialogue? Does nobody follow the script?" That drove me crazy.

      TIME: Do you ad-lib in the movie?
      Chan: I ad-lib while I'm fighting. Chris Tucker does a lot of verbal
      comedy. I do a lot of action comedy. But he taught me a lot of bad
      jokes, black jokes, bad words.

      TIME: In the past, you have turned down some scripts that contain
      foul language or dirty jokes. Why?
      Chan: Because so many children see my movies. All my action films
      have lots of fighting but no blood. I often ask art directors to put
      no smoking signs behind me. In Rush Hour I pick up a newspaper off
      the floor and put it in the trash can. I want to educate children.

      TIME: Some people have complained that Rush Hour merely reinforces
      standard Chinese stereotypes.
      Chan: For us--Chow Yun-fat, Jet Li, me--it's either Hong Kong Cop or
      Killer from China, because our English isn't strong. I want to be
      something else, like a fighter pilot in Top Gun, but no audience
      would believe it.

      TIME: Were the stunts in Rush Hour good enough for you?
      Chan: For the Americans, yes. For me, no. In Chinese films we fight
      half an hour, but American productions have their own formula. I'd
      want to continue fighting, but after two minutes the director would
      say, "Enough, finish, cut." Anyway, the box office rules, and it
      seems they were right and I was wrong.

      TIME: Do Americans appreciate your fighting style?
      Chan: They used to like only John Wayne's type: boom, out, one
      punch. They'd say, "Jackie your punch has no power. You fight this
      guy for 10 minutes: double kick, turning kick, five punches, still
      standing there." I said: "That's art, not fighting." But later on,
      everybody begins to imitate my style.

      TIME: Have you ever walked away from a stunt?
      Chan: No, because I always control the scenes. It's not like
      somebody designs them for me. I am the stunt director and my team
      has been with me for 15 years. I know I'm crazy, but I won't risk my
      life.
      TIME: How much longer can you keep doing this?
      Chan: I don't know. I always think something will happen to me. An
      accident is an accident. If I break my ankle, click, I just snap it
      back. I have so many scars.

      TIME: Who will be your successor?
      Chan: I've been looking for a young Jackie Chan, a star who can make
      action movies. And then young people will follow my step. There are
      young stars, but they either fight or sing, and after two years they
      are finished. Maybe I'll try my son.

      TIME: Does the Hong Kong movie industry have a future?
      Chan: Hong Kong films and their influence are getting smaller.
      America is so strong. Michael Jordan shoes, hot dogs, Coca-Cola--
      everybody wants American things. We don't have our own culture
      anymore in Hong Kong. I don't see any way Hong Kong films can break
      through. If you gave a ticket to a local person and said Hong Kong
      film or U.S. film, I bet you $100 they'd go for the American film.

      TIME: Your new autobiography is filled with very personal detail.
      Are there subjects you omitted?
      Chan: There are lots of things I have left out of this book. Later I
      believe I will write a book about the triads and me, about the
      police and me, about my love stories.

      TIME: One person threading through your life is Samo Hung. You met
      him in drama school, starred with him in films, and he later
      directed you. In the book he's portrayed as a bully.
      Chan: Yeah, he is a devil. Even now, in America, he would
      say, "Jackie, give me an ashtray!" If he asks somebody else to get
      him one, he will stand up and say, "Thank you very much." Not me. He
      treats everybody better than me. But I still like him.

      TIME: What's your next project?
      Chan: It's a love story: a fantasy about a village girl in Taiwan
      who comes to Hong Kong. I'm the playboy.




      =============


      02/01/2003 : Whoa Sir Jackie!
      Jackie Chan interviewed in Taipei, Taiwan
      http://www.jackiechan.com/news/

      01/21/2003 : Fortissimo picks up "Jackie Chan And His Lost Family"
      Fortissimo Film Sales has picked up the documentary "Traces Of A
      Dragon: Jackie Chan And His Lost Family "

      01/20/2003 : Jackie "stars" as real estate agent
      Jackie Chan wants to kick some life into Hong Kong's slumping
      property market.

      01/17/2003 : Jackie Chan's dream house
      Jackie is building his dream house in Hong Kong.

      12/13/2002 : Jackie and his father donate $145,000
      Jackie Chan and his father donated $145,000 to the John Curtin
      School of Medical Research in Canberra

      11/11/2002 : Jackie suffers minor burns
      Jackie talks about the recent trouble with the Hong Kong press

      11/01/2002 : Titanium Rain starts production in June
      Stanley Tong teams up with Jackie for Jackie's next HK movie,
      Titanium Rain

      10/27/2002 : Jackie Chan fights piracy
      Jackie takes time off from work and goes to Hong Kong to speak up
      against piracy

      10/12/2002 : Around the World in 80 Days gets an update
      Director Frank Coraci wants to update the classic tale by Jules
      Verne

      10/05/2002 : Jackie receives his star of fame
      Jackie Chan received a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

      08/23/2002 : Jackie Chan becomes a web-cartoon
      Jackie and Entertainment Technology Company will release a series of
      animated Jackie-action online

      08/13/2002 : Columbia Pictures doesn't accept Highbinders
      Columbia Pictures doesn't accept the final print of Highbinders
      because the dialogue has been changed from the original script.

      07/11/2002 : Around the World in 80 Days
      Paramount Pictures will produce Jackie's 80 Days, which starts this
      fall

      07/01/2002 : Jingle Ma to direct Jackie Chan in $40m Titanium Rain
      Media Asia has lined up hot Hong Kong director Jingle Ma to direct
      its $40m Jackie Chan vehicle Titanium Rain.

      06/21/2002 : Chan's the man for 'Eighty Days'
      Jackie Chan will star in a remake of "Around the World in Eighty
      Days"

      06/20/2002 : Jackie Chan's The Bellboy Scoop
      News on Jackie Chan's upcoming Jerry Lewis remake

      05/21/2002 : Rush Hour 2 gets 3 awards at World Stunt Awards
      3 awards for Rush Hour 2 while Jackie gets honoured with a Taurus
      Honorary Awards

      05/16/2002 : Jackie to accept award at World Stunt Awards
      World-renowned action film star and stuntman Jackie Chan has been
      selected by The World Stunt Academy to receive Taurus Honorary
      Achievement Awards..

      04/24/2002 : Highbinders gets US release
      Columbia Tristar wants to release the movie world-wide in February
      2003

      04/11/2002 : The Tuxedo release pushed back to October..
      Jackie's latest US flick, The Tuxedo, which was originally going to
      be released in on June 7th..

      03/18/2002 : Jackie forced to take a 60 days vacation
      Jackie is forced to take 60 days off during shooting of Shanghai
      Knights

      03/05/2002 : Jackie Chan EyeGear
      Jackie Chan launches his own line of eyewear, Jackie Chan EyeGear

      03/01/2002 : Jackie's mom, Lee-lee Chan, has passed away
      During the filming of "Highbinders" in Thailand, Jackie has found
      out that his mother has died in bed..

      02/24/2002 : Titanium Rain, Jackie's timetravelling
      Jackie joins Media Asia Group to make a Chinese sci-fi/period movie

      02/19/2002 : Jackie injured on the set of Highbinders
      Hong Kong newspapers reported that Jackie was on set while filming
      Highbinders in Thailand

      02/18/2002 : Jackie loves his fans
      Jackie doesn't like celebrating Chinese new year, but he loves to
      interact with his fan clubs..

      02/12/2002 : An Irish castle in Thailand
      The last phase of Jackie's lastest asian flick, The Highinders, is
      underway..

      01/22/2002 : The joy of Jackie
      We're often hearing stories of tantrums and tears from the set of
      Hollywood movies, but..

      01/21/2002 : The Highbinders update
      Four news stories about Jackie's latest HK flick, The Highbinders..

      01/20/2002 : Jackie Chan's new music album
      Jackie Chan is getting ready to release his first mandarin album in
      years..

      12/22/2001 : Willie Chan sent to the hospital
      Jackie Chan's manager Willie Chan was found unconscious yesterday..

      12/10/2001 : Fann Wong may star in Shanghai Knights
      Fann Wong may be starring in her first Hollywood movie, in a role
      opposite Jackie Chan

      12/05/2001 : Columbia Tristar buys rights for The Highbinders
      Columbia TriStar Motion Picture Group has acquired worldwide
      rights..

      12/04/2001 : Shanghai Knights plot change
      Shanghai Noon 's sequel, Shanghai Knights, involves Jack the Ripper

      11/19/2001 : Toronto honours Jackie Chan
      Star thrills his fans at action-packed charity fundraiser

      11/16/2001 : Jackie is getting worn out..
      Jackie says, "the most tiring, most difficult shoot to date"

      10/25/2001 : Toronto mayor to proclaim Jackie Chan Day
      The mayor of Canada's most populous city is expected to proclaim
      Jackie Chan Day..

      10/25/2001 : Charity gives Jackie Chan a kick
      Action film hero Jackie Chan put some smiles on sick kids faces
      yesterday..

      09/09/2001 : Jackie's clothing label, Blanc de Chine
      One of Hong Kong's best-kept fashion secrets is Blanc de Chine..

      09/04/2001 : Jackie honoured at the Montreal Film Festival
      Jackie is honoured for his great work and for beeing a great role
      model in Montreal..

      08/16/2001 : Highinders Press Conference video clips
      10 clips with actors telling about the movie, working with Jackie
      and about themselves..

      08/16/2001 : Jackie is taken with Ireland
      Jackie's very impressed with the Irish crew and thinks the Irish
      people are 'great'..

      08/13/2001 : Highinders Press Conference
      The Irish crews are very professional and I like Guinness." were
      Jackie's first words..

      08/11/2001 : Jackie falls for Ireland
      Jackie Chan says he loves Ireland but not the weather.

      08/10/2001 : Shanghai Knights gets a director
      David Dobkin will direct Disney-based Spyglass
      Entertainment's "Shanghai Knights,"

      08/06/2001 : Commuters crowd theaters for Rush Hour 2
      The buddy-cop sequel grossed $66.8 million in its first three days..

      08/02/2001 : Jackie details his future
      Jackie Chan details his action-packed future..

      07/25/2001 : Shanghai Noon sequel
      Shanghai Noon screenwriters reveals some info their sequel, Shanghai
      Knights.

      06/20/2001 : Official Jackie Chan Fan Club for Kids!
      Jackie and Willie Chan has given Katharine Mysak permission to start
      an OFFICIAL Fan club..

      06/05/2001 : Spielberg to do Jackie's and EMG's Tuxedo
      Jackie Chan is going to Canada to become a more dramatic actor for
      one of his next projects..

      05/29/2001 : Sun Tzu : Art of War and Operation Condor 3
      Jackie Chan will star in two big-budget projects for Golden
      Harvest..

      05/25/2001 : Jackie's upcoming projects
      Jackie revealed his upcoming projects during a dinner with the
      Accidental Spy crew..

      05/25/2001 : The Highbinders gets new director
      Hong Kong filmmaker Gordon Chan (Fist of Legend) has replaced
      Reginald Hudlin..

      05/19/2001 : Lee Evans in talks to star in Highbinders
      Zany British comedian Lee Evans is set to star with kung-fu legend
      Jackie Chan..

      05/18/2001 : More news on Jackie's Tuxedo project
      Jackie Chan is formalizing plans for the formal-wear comedy "The
      Tuxedo"..

      04/30/2001 : Chan to the rescue of Irish movies
      More interesting info on Jackie Chan's next project, the
      Highbinders.

      03/23/2001 : Jackie Chan's Rush Hour 2 blackmailed
      Salseman charged with one count of blackmail..

      03/01/2001 : Big week for Jackie
      Last week was a big week for superstar Jackie Chan..

      02/24/2001 : Hudlin to direct "Highbinders".
      U.S. director Reginald Hudlin is attached to direct Jackie Chan's
      next project..

      02/23/2001 : Jackie Chan kicks his way into Burger King
      Burger King Corporation kicks off its latest kids' promotion with
      Jackie Chan..

      02/13/2001 : Accidental Spy news
      Accidental Spy does good in Asia, Miramax has bought the release
      rights for the US

      01/24/2001 : Rush Hour 2?
      What we know about Rush Hour 2 so far.. warning - spoilers!

      01/18/2001 : What's going on now?
      Article on what's happening in the world of Chan and some words on
      the future..

      01/17/2001 : Legend of Drunken Master DVD
      DVDReview.com is reporting that LoDM will be released early this
      year.

      01/12/2001 : Jackie Chan's back injury
      Jackie Chan temporary paralyzed during shooting of Accidental Spy!

      01/09/2001 : Jackie Chan's life on film
      Superstar Jackie Chan will be the focus of a new documentary.

      01/09/2001 : Chan has reasons for making cartoon
      "A cartoon goes forever, and I don't hurt myself."

      01/02/2001 : The Highbinders
      Jackie Chan's newest project, "The Highbinders" is under
      production..
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