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Re: [Artificial Intelligence Group] CFP: EvoGAMES - Paper deadline: 4/11-2009

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  • david mares
    Thank you very much for the info.  It was very helpful, but I have a specific question.  Is it possible for a computer to possess a personality?  I m
    Message 1 of 4 , Sep 1, 2009
      Thank you very much for the info.  It was very helpful, but I have a specific question.  Is it possible for a computer to possess a personality?  I'm talking about a singularly intelligent being, an artificially intelligent entity with the power to make decisions on its own. 




      ________________________________
      From: mike_preuss <mike.preuss@...>
      To: artificialintelligencegroup@yahoogroups.com
      Sent: Tuesday, September 1, 2009 12:40:52 PM
      Subject: [Artificial Intelligence Group] CFP: EvoGAMES - Paper deadline: 4/11-2009

       
      EvoGames: 2nd European event on Bio-inspired Algorithms in Games,
      Istanbul, 7th - 9th April 2010

      http://dces. essex.ac. uk/research/ evostar/EvoGAMES .htm

      Games, and especially video games, are now a financially and
      culturally important commercial factor within the software and
      entertainment industries. They provide an excellent test bed for
      and application of a wide range of computational intelligence
      methods including evolutionary computation, neural networks,
      fuzzy systems, swarm intelligence, and temporal difference
      learning. There has been a rapid growth in research in this area
      over the last few years. This event focuses on new computational
      intelligence or biologically inspired techniques that may be of
      practical value for improvement of existing games or creation of
      new games, as well as on innovative uses of games to improve or
      test computational intelligence algorithms. We invite
      prospective participants to submit full papers following
      Springer's LNCS guidelines.

      Topics include but are not limited to:

      * Avatars and new forms of communication between game
      intelligence and players
      * Player satisfaction measurement and optimization
      * (Semi-)automated game content creation
      * Evolutionary game theory
      * Human-like artificial adversaries and emotion modeling
      * Authentic movement, believable multi-agent control
      * Computational Intelligence in video games
      * Learning in games
      * Experimental methods for gameplay evaluation
      * Evolutionary testing and debugging of games
      * Games related to social, economic, and financial
      simulations
      * Educational/ serious games
      * General game intelligence (e.g. general purpose
      drop-n-play Non-Player Characters, NPCs).


      Program Committee:

      Lourdes Araujo, UNED, Spain
      Wolfgang Banzhaf, Memorial University of Newfoundland, Canada
      Luigi Barone, University of Western Australia, Australia
      Simon Colton, Imperial College London, UK
      Ernesto Costa, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal
      Carlos Cotta, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
      Marc Ebner, Universität Tübingen, Germany
      Anikó Ekárt, Aston University, UK
      Anna Esparcia Alcázar, University of Valencia, Spain
      Antonio J Fernández Leiva, Universidad de Málaga, Spain
      Francisco Fernández, Universidad de Extremadura, Spain
      Mario Giacobini, Università degli Studi di Torino, Italy
      Johan Hagelbäck, Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden
      John Hallam, University of Southern Denmark, Denmark
      David Hart, Fall Line Studio, USA
      Philip Hingston, Edith Cowan University, Australia
      Stefan Johansson, Blekinge Tekniska Högskola, Sweden
      Krzysztof Krawiec, Poznan University of Technology, Poland
      Oliver Kramer, TU Dortmund, Germany
      Bill Langdon, University of Essex, UK
      Pier Luca Lanzi, Politecnico di Milano, Italy
      Simon Lucas, University of Essex, UK
      Penousal Machado, Universidade de Coimbra, Portugal
      JJ Merelo, Universidad de Granada, Spain
      Risto Miikkulainen, University of Texas at Austin, USA
      Steffen Priesterjahn, University of Paderborn, Germany
      Moshe Sipper, Ben-Gurion University, Israel
      Terry Soule, University of Idaho, USA


      Event chairs:
      Mike Preuss, TU Dortmund, Germany, mike.preuss@ tu-dortmund. de
      Julian Togelius, IT University of Copenhagen (Center for
      Computer Games Research), Dennmark, juto@...
      Georgios N. Yannakakis, IT University of Copenhagen (Center for
      Computer Games Research), Dennmark, yannakakis@itu. dk







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    • mike_preuss
      Dear David, this is a very interesting question, but in computer games research, that is not exactly what people want. For games, it is important that the
      Message 2 of 4 , Sep 4, 2009
        Dear David,

        this is a very interesting question, but in computer games research, that is not exactly what people want. For games, it is important that
        the player gets the impression that 'it could be so'. The character has to be 'believable' (this is one of the current buzz-words in this area). It may even be the case that intuitively, players realize that the NPC is not 'really' intelligent. But they may appear sufficiently intelligent not to fall out of the immersion into the game the player wants to keep. So the player 'works' in our favor if we give him some 'food'. And I'm sure contemporary AI of all different flavors can contribute to that.

        Best, Mike





        --- In artificialintelligencegroup@yahoogroups.com, david mares <night.mares1@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thank you very much for the info.  It was very helpful, but I have a specific question.  Is it possible for a computer to possess a personality?  I'm talking about a singularly intelligent being, an artificially intelligent entity with the power to make decisions on its own. 
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • david mares
        Dear Mike Well to tell you the truth while I don t like to admit it most of the time, but when I think about it I can t really deny it I am gamer BIGTIME.  I
        Message 3 of 4 , Sep 4, 2009
          Dear Mike

          Well to tell you the truth while I don't like to admit it most of the time, but when I think about it I can't really deny it I am gamer BIGTIME.  I believe the application of AI in video games is kind of frivolous "kind of."  There is so much more out there that could benefit from AI.  The thing that fascnates me so much about AI is I believe it can help mankind in so many ways.  As a matter of fact I was wondering if one would be able to some how purchase one of those highly sophisticated AI programs your talking about are any of these on the market yet. 




          ________________________________
          From: mike_preuss <mike.preuss@...>
          To: artificialintelligencegroup@yahoogroups.com
          Sent: Friday, September 4, 2009 2:53:29 AM
          Subject: Re: [Artificial Intelligence Group] CFP: EvoGAMES - Paper deadline: 4/11-2009

           
          Dear David,

          this is a very interesting question, but in computer games research, that is not exactly what people want. For games, it is important that
          the player gets the impression that 'it could be so'. The character has to be 'believable' (this is one of the current buzz-words in this area). It may even be the case that intuitively, players realize that the NPC is not 'really' intelligent. But they may appear sufficiently intelligent not to fall out of the immersion into the game the player wants to keep. So the player 'works' in our favor if we give him some 'food'. And I'm sure contemporary AI of all different flavors can contribute to that.

          Best, Mike

          --- In artificialintellige ncegroup@ yahoogroups. com, david mares <night.mares1@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > Thank you very much for the info.  It was very helpful, but I have a specific question.  Is it possible for a computer to possess a personality?  I'm talking about a singularly intelligent being, an artificially intelligent entity with the power to make decisions on its own. 
          >
          >
          >
          >







          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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