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Kalamazoo 2011 Update

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  • List Moderator, The Society for the Study
    List Members: The following 2 sessions have been approved for the 2011 International Congress on Medieval Studies. Please send proposals ASAP to me at
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 13, 2010
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      List Members:

      The following 2 sessions have been approved for the 2011 International
      Congress on Medieval Studies. Please send proposals ASAP to me at <
      popular.culture.and.the.middle.ages@...>, and I will endeavor to get
      back to you all as quickly as possible.

      Twenty-first Century Medievalisms: Re-envisioning the Medieval in the
      Contemporary World (Roundtable)

      Despite our temporal distance from the Middle Ages, the medieval continues
      to fascinate us both as scholars and consumers, and, as part of our ongoing
      mission to explore the representation of the medieval in post-medieval
      culture, the Virtual Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle
      Ages (formerly the Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle
      Ages) proposes a set of two roundtables on the topic of Twenty-first Century
      Medievalisms: Re-envisioning the Medieval in the Contemporary World. We are
      especially interested in investigating why medieval subjects remain relevant
      in the modern world and how they have been appropriated and transformed by
      creative artists, politicians, and special interest groups since the turn of
      the second millennium. Specific topics to be addressed include the
      following: recent representations of mythic material like the Matter of
      Britain (e.g. Fate/stay night [2005-], King Arthur [2004], Merlin [2008-],
      and Shrek the Third [2007]) and the legends of Robin Hood (e.g. Robin
      Hood [2006-2009]
      and Robin Hood [2010]) in global multimedia and their relationship with
      prior traditions; the BBC�s role as creator of medieval-themed
      entertainment, notably Robin Hood (2006-2009) and Merlin (2008-), for
      international audiences; the increased role of cable television (e.g. The
      Discovery Channel, The History Channel, History Channel International, The
      Travel Channel), both in the United States and abroad, as disseminator of
      information about the Middle Ages and/or, specifically with the Syfy
      (formerly Sci-Fi) Channel, medieval-themed entertainment; Crusade rhetoric
      in the wake of events of 11 September 2001; the popularity of J. R. R.
      Tolkien, his works, and Tolkienesque fantasy following the success of Peter
      Jackson�s film trilogy; and the impact of new media, particularly online
      games and other virtual entertainment, on the furtherance of medievalism.


      Arthurian Villains on Film: Studies in Commemoration of the Thirtieth
      Anniversary of John Boorman�s Excalibur

      In furtherance of our respective missions, the Alliance for the Promotion of
      Research on the Villains of the Matter of Britain and the Virtual Society
      for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages (formerly the Society
      for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages) are proposing a set of
      two sessions devoted to the theme of Arthurian Villains on Film: Studies in
      Commemoration of the Thirtieth Anniversary of John Boorman�s Excalibur.
      Papers included in these sessions will explore the representations of the
      villains of the Matter of Britain, both traditional ones (e.g. Cerdic, Lot
      of Orkney, Mark of Cornwall, Mordred, Morgan le Fay, Morgause, and
      Vortigern) as well as those (e.g. Brack, Cynric, Mab, Mad Madame Mim,
      Palamides, Ruber, and, even sometimes, Merlin) unique to specific
      productions, as represented in films, television programming, and other
      visual electronic multimedia, such as electronic games and Internet videos.

      The Arthurian legend has been represented in films since at least the late
      1890s and in television programming since the 1950s, and the villains of
      these productions serve important, though often overlooked, roles as the
      initiators of dramatic action and as the counteragents to their respective
      heroes. Despite these vital narrative functions, study of the filmic
      villains of the Matter of Britain remains in its infancy with few studies
      engaged with their role in specific productions and with only a handful of
      overviews of their careers as investigated (in chronological order) by
      Elizabeth S. Sklar, Jacqueline de Weever, Maureen Fries, and Michael A.
      Torregrossa.

      Since its introduction in the 1980s, Arthurian film and television studies
      has matured into a legitimate field of investigation, and the thirtieth
      anniversary of John Boorman�s Excalibur (1981), a key text for the study of
      Arthurian villains on film, marks an appropriate time to reflect upon the
      role that the villains play in the Arthurian story. Boorman�s Excalibur has
      become a seminal text for scholars of Arthurian-themed films and part of the
      modern canon of popular Arthuriana. Moreover, it is especially important for
      its presentation of the villains Morgana and Mordred and their relationship
      to King Arthur, as Boorman is the first filmmaker (as Torregrossa has
      explored) to fully depict the incest of King Arthur (here with Morgana), an
      act that results in the conception of Mordred, and its consequences. In
      addition, Boorman�s versions of both Morgan le Fay and Mordred have shaped
      countless later representations of these characters in popular Arthuriana
      throughout the globe.

      --
      Michael A. Torregrossa, Listserv Moderator/ Blog Editor
      The Virtual Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages
      Michael A Torregrossa and Carl James Grindley, Co-Founders
      http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org
      http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.blogspot.com/
      The Arthur of the Comics Project Blog:
      http://arthur-of-thecomics-project.blogspot.com/


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