Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Sponsored Sessions for Kalamazoo 2009

Expand Messages
  • Michael Torregrossa
    List members, Here is the semi-offical CFP ffrom the Medieval Insitute. If you are interested in propossing a paper for one of sessions, please do so as soon
    Message 1 of 1 , Jun 20, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      List members,

      Here is the semi-offical CFP ffrom the Medieval Insitute. If you are
      interested in propossing a paper for one of sessions, please do so as soon
      as possible, as there are relatively few sessions this year on medievalism.
      Also, please let us know if you ae interested in serving on the roundtable,
      as there are other similrly themed sessions proposed for the conference. We
      are especially interested in presenations for the roundtable that reate to
      our theme of "Medievalisms at War".

      Michael


      Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages (3): I�II.
      Medievalisms at War I�II; III. Getting Medieval on Popular Culture in the
      Classroom: Pedagogy and Medievalism (A Roundtable)


      ORIGINAL PROPOSAL
      Encompassing over a thousand years of human history, the medieval era
      continues to fascinate modern audiences, in particular those that experience
      the Middle Ages depicted by the producers of popular entertainment, which
      has realistically recreated all aspects of the medieval world, especially
      its wars, in the arts and media as diverse as fiction, film, comics, and
      electronic games. Recognizing the centrality of war to medieval culture and
      its continued relevance today, the Society for the Study of Popular Culture
      and the Middle Ages, in observation of its fifth anniversary in 2009, would
      like to propose a set of three sessions under the general theme of
      "Medievalisms at War," a topic that recalls our inaugural sessions, entitled
      "Medieval Films at War," at the 2004 conference of the Film & History
      League. We envision our sessions at the Congress as the culmination of our
      celebrations and intend to use them to explore what we see as neglected
      aspects of research into medieval-themed popular culture of the modern era:
      representations of the Vikings, representations of the Crusades, and the
      interrelationships between medieval themes and modern warfare, specifically
      when the medieval is used for propagandist purposes. In additional to these
      sessions, the society would also like to propose a roundtable devoted to
      teaching the Middle Ages, especially aspects of its wars and warfare,
      through modern popular culture. As usual, presentations in our sessions
      will engage a variety of texts and media in the furtherance of our mission
      to produce scholarship that bridges the gap between Medieval Studies and
      Popular Culture Studies.

      --
      Michael A. Torregrossa, M.A.
      Co-Founder, The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages
      http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.