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Morrison's "Rock of Ages" arc in JLA (was Re: From the horse's mouth)

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  • Michael Torregrossa
    I ve just re-read this arc and the preceding issues for my Kalamazoo paper on the Grail in the DCU. There is one page where Metron specifically equates the
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 24, 2008
      I've just re-read this arc and the preceding issues for my Kalamazoo
      paper on the Grail in the DCU. There is one page where Metron
      specifically equates the Philosopher's Stone as the Grail, while the
      JLA is equated with the Knights of the Round Table with their round
      table and empty seat at the table (a connection made more explicit in
      the letter's page of one issue). Otherwise, Morrison's evocation of
      the Grail quest still alludes me.

      FYI: Morrison also says that his SEAGUY series was a Grail quest.

      Michael

      --- In arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com, Jason Tondro <jvester@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Everyone,
      >
      > I recently wrote to Grant Morrison to see if he felt like talking about
      > Arthurian elements in the Justice League and his other work. I thought
      > some folks might find his response interesting ...
      >
      >
      > "The JLA Round Table was indeed intended to invoke the Arthurian table
      > and the 'Rock of Ages' storyline was constructed upon the Grail Quest
      > template (the 'worlogog' or Philosopher's Stone is the Grail, the
      > Watchtower is Camelot, Dr. Alchemy appears briefly as Klingsor, Kyle
      > Rayner retraces Sir Perceval's journey to the Grail Castle, the
      > Wasteland appears as Darkseid's conquered, ravaged Earth and so on until
      > you grow a third eyebrow just thinking about it)
      >
      > The final volume of THE INVISIBLES drips equally with Grail imagery and
      > overt Arthurian references. It's an aspect of the story that's rarely
      > commented on but the book included, among other things, my attempt to
      > update and revitalise a number of >cough< 'Archetypal Themes and
      > Patterns' from the Grail romances and their weird Celtic precursors."
      >
      > Morrison is actually pretty accessible for a comic writer. His website
      > is at http://www.grant-morrison.com
      > Also, the entire "Rock of Ages" story has been collected as a trade,
      > which not only makes it accessible to fans but also makes it a potential
      > text for classrooms.
      >
      > Cheers,
      > Jason
      >
    • Alan Stewart
      An interview with Sam Sarkar, the creator of the new Radical Comics series Caliber has been posted on the Comic Book Resources web site:
      Message 2 of 9 , May 5, 2008
        An interview with Sam Sarkar, the creator of the new Radical Comics' series Caliber has been posted on the Comic Book Resources web site:

        http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=16290

        "With a drastic setting change -- from Britain in the eleventh century to the Pacific Northwest in the frontier times -- Sarkar's 'Caliber' is a new kind of Arthur story. The Knights of the Round Table are gunfighters sworn to protect the innocent, with (Ex)Caliber itself depicted as a magical six-shooter that never misses, but only when drawn by a man with justice on his side."

        -- Alan


        ---------------------------------
        Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it now.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Michael Torregrossa
        Alan, Thanks for the head s up. Michael ... -- Michael A. Torregrossa, M.A. Co-Founder, The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages
        Message 3 of 9 , May 6, 2008
          Alan,

          Thanks for the head's up.

          Michael

          On Mon, May 5, 2008 at 10:52 PM, Alan Stewart <merrygawain@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > An interview with Sam Sarkar, the creator of the new Radical Comics' series
          > Caliber has been posted on the Comic Book Resources web site:
          >
          > http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=16290
          >
          > "With a drastic setting change -- from Britain in the eleventh century to
          > the Pacific Northwest in the frontier times -- Sarkar's 'Caliber' is a new
          > kind of Arthur story. The Knights of the Round Table are gunfighters sworn
          > to protect the innocent, with (Ex)Caliber itself depicted as a magical
          > six-shooter that never misses, but only when drawn by a man with justice on
          > his side."
          >
          > -- Alan
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Be a better friend, newshound, and know-it-all with Yahoo! Mobile. Try it
          > now.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
          >



          --
          Michael A. Torregrossa, M.A.
          Co-Founder, The Society for the Study of Popular Culture and the Middle Ages
          http://PopularCultureandtheMiddleAges.org
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