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Re: Knights of Pendragon

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  • Jason Tondro
    So Michael, I (at long last!) read your chapter in Barbara s book on Arthurian comics and you have corrected my previous assumption on Claremont s use of
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 9, 2007
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      So Michael, I (at long last!) read your chapter in Barbara's book on
      Arthurian comics and you have corrected my previous assumption on
      Claremont's use of Arthur in Excalibur. I always presumed it was just
      a marketing ploy, but I think you make a pretty good case --
      especially with Claremont's illuminating quote on the topic -- that
      there was at least a token effort to capture the spirit of Arthur
      there, or the sword, even if later issues of the comic seemed to have
      little to do with the myth itself.

      I was not sure what I was going to say about Knights of Pendragon
      until I read an editor's response in the letter column of, I think,
      issue 13. The editor wrote, apparently in complete sincerity, that
      what differentiated Arthurian myth from other legendary characters in
      Britain's past is that Arthur had no political or geographical
      agenda; he was a "global hero" intent on protecting the world at
      large, not his country per se.

      I think this is going to give me some traction, and I anticipate
      talking about Arthur's adoption as a global myth that somehow relates
      to all cultures. Naturally, because of my background, I'll mostly be
      illustrating this trend through comics.

      Jason
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