Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Arthurian comics for school lessons

Expand Messages
  • Jochen Zauner
    Hello, I’m preparing for a didactics exam. I am supposed to draft a teaching plan about how to deal with King Arthur and the Middle Ages in English lessons
    Message 1 of 4 , Mar 5, 2006
    • 0 Attachment
      Hello,



      I’m preparing for a didactics exam. I am supposed to draft a teaching plan
      about how to deal with King Arthur and the Middle Ages in English lessons
      (English as a foreign language for students in the 7th form).



      One idea would be to use comics which are close to the original texts by
      Chrétien de Troyes or Geoffrey of Monmouth. Which ones would you recommend?
      Would you have any other suggestions about how to present the Middle Ages?
      Apart from pure language teaching English lessons are also supposed to
      include cultural/regional aspects so that the topic could be part of a unit
      about Wales.



      Kind regards,

      Jochen



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jason Tondro
      This is a tough one. Perhaps the biggest problem is accessibility -- even if you are able to find comics that are close to the sources you mention, good luck
      Message 2 of 4 , Mar 7, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        This is a tough one.

        Perhaps the biggest problem is accessibility -- even if you are able
        to find comics that are close to the sources you mention, good luck
        finding enough copies of the comic to give out to your class! While
        there have been trade collections of comics which use vintage
        translations of Beowulf ("Beowulf," Gareth Hinds writer & artist) and
        the Song of Roland ("Roland: Days of Wrath", Shayne L. Amaya writer,
        Fabio Moon, artist) as the only text for the book, I can't think of
        an equivalent Arthurian comic. Caliber's "Legends of Camelot" effort
        produced stories based on particular episodes -- Gereint and Enid,
        the finding of Excalibur -- but nothing as canonical as the "birth of
        Arthur" story from Geoffrey or Chretien's Knight of the Cart. "Prince
        Valiant" is relatively easy to get -- it has been collected and
        published in folio-size editions from Fantagraphics -- but that story
        (while true to the spirit of the Arthurian legends, and well
        researched) is a "medievalism" rather than medieval lit.

        Since you seem to still be looking for options, I might recommend an
        approach that uses a highly illustrated prose edition rather than a
        comic, such as one with Howard Pyle's justly famed illustrations.
        Pyle's work is in the public domain by now, which has the added
        advantage of making your book inexpensive. This would be Mallory,
        however, or a Mallory redaction, rather than Geoffrey or Chretien.

        Good luck,
        Jason Tondro
      • Jochen Zauner
        Hello, Do you happen to know any quality movies which are close to the original texts? Such films could also be used at school. Regards, Jochen ... Von:
        Message 3 of 4 , Mar 19, 2006
        • 0 Attachment
          Hello,



          Do you happen to know any quality movies which are close to the original
          texts? Such films could also be used at school.



          Regards,

          Jochen



          -----Ursprüngliche Nachricht-----
          Von: arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com
          [mailto:arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com] Im Auftrag von Jason Tondro
          Gesendet: Dienstag, 7. März 2006 21:17
          An: arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com
          Betreff: Re: [arthurian_comixlist] Arthurian comics for school lessons



          This is a tough one.

          Perhaps the biggest problem is accessibility -- even if you are able
          to find comics that are close to the sources you mention, good luck
          finding enough copies of the comic to give out to your class! While
          there have been trade collections of comics which use vintage
          translations of Beowulf ("Beowulf," Gareth Hinds writer & artist) and
          the Song of Roland ("Roland: Days of Wrath", Shayne L. Amaya writer,
          Fabio Moon, artist) as the only text for the book, I can't think of
          an equivalent Arthurian comic. Caliber's "Legends of Camelot" effort
          produced stories based on particular episodes -- Gereint and Enid,
          the finding of Excalibur -- but nothing as canonical as the "birth of
          Arthur" story from Geoffrey or Chretien's Knight of the Cart. "Prince
          Valiant" is relatively easy to get -- it has been collected and
          published in folio-size editions from Fantagraphics -- but that story
          (while true to the spirit of the Arthurian legends, and well
          researched) is a "medievalism" rather than medieval lit.

          Since you seem to still be looking for options, I might recommend an
          approach that uses a highly illustrated prose edition rather than a
          comic, such as one with Howard Pyle's justly famed illustrations.
          Pyle's work is in the public domain by now, which has the added
          advantage of making your book inexpensive. This would be Mallory,
          however, or a Mallory redaction, rather than Geoffrey or Chretien.

          Good luck,
          Jason Tondro



          SPONSORED LINKS


          Medieval
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Medieval+costume&w1=Medieval+costume&w2
          =Comic+book&w3=Medieval+armor&w4=Arthurian&c=4&s=73&.sig=RfBEY5sTeZEH5PwnB46
          fuw> costume

          Comic
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Comic+book&w1=Medieval+costume&w2=Comic
          +book&w3=Medieval+armor&w4=Arthurian&c=4&s=73&.sig=rpuB7Ne87KbGxBcvdGHpVg>
          book

          Medieval
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Medieval+armor&w1=Medieval+costume&w2=C
          omic+book&w3=Medieval+armor&w4=Arthurian&c=4&s=73&.sig=4NaV0oQ2I-yVLiQoGShxF
          w> armor


          Arthurian
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/gads?t=ms&k=Arthurian&w1=Medieval+costume&w2=Comic+
          book&w3=Medieval+armor&w4=Arthurian&c=4&s=73&.sig=MOwAK5LKJvIvTn9UL81CKw>







          _____

          YAHOO! GROUPS LINKS



          * Visit your group "arthurian_comixlist
          <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/arthurian_comixlist> " on the web.


          * To unsubscribe from this group, send an email to:
          arthurian_comixlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com
          <mailto:arthurian_comixlist-unsubscribe@yahoogroups.com?subject=Unsubscribe>



          * Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo!
          <http://docs.yahoo.com/info/terms/> Terms of Service.



          _____



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Nastali@aol.com
          The closest movie to an actual medieval text is Perceval le Gallois, the 1978 film directed by Eric Rohmer. It s in French, but available on DVD with English
          Message 4 of 4 , Mar 24, 2006
          • 0 Attachment
            The closest movie to an actual medieval text is Perceval le Gallois, the 1978
            film directed by Eric Rohmer. It's in French, but available on DVD with
            English subtitles. This is Chrétien de Troyes' Grail romance, and it's as close to
            a direct translation to the screen as you can imagine. Even the settings of
            the scenes are designed to look like manuscript miniatures, and the music
            sounds medieval. Warning: medieval storytelling can seem so odd to modern audiences
            that more people hate this film than love it, and I've seen it empty a
            theater on a university campus.

            Dan Nastali


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.