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Comic styles and story boarding

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  • Reynold Greenleaf
    Hi Everyone I am an amateur artist and am thinking of trying to get a graphic novel together. My idea is to take some existing, but little known mediaeval
    Message 1 of 4 , Nov 9, 2005
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      Hi Everyone

      I am an amateur artist and am thinking of trying to get a graphic
      novel together. My idea is to take some existing, but little known
      mediaeval stories and weave them into a graphic novel.

      My question is two fold.

      First off I was wondering what sort of style to use. Do i go for the
      mediaeval falt style with little to no perspective, or do I try a
      more Frank Miller style of black and white with the odd bit of
      colour, or indeed (my preferred option) to go for sepia inks and
      colourwash.

      Secondly, I would like some pionters on story boarding. Some of the
      texts I am using are prose, some poems. I want to transfer this into
      a framed story for use in a graphic novel, rather than just
      illustrating the story. What, if any, are the general rules regarding
      storyboarding. I do not want to loose the story line, but neither do
      I think it appropriate to include the full prose.

      Your thoughts would be most welcome.

      Regards

      Reynold
    • jtondro@charter.net
      Reynold, Welcome aboard. Your new project sounds very interesting, not least because it will give all us academics something to talk about in a future
      Message 2 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
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        Reynold,

        Welcome aboard. Your new project sounds very interesting, not least because it will give all us academics something to talk about in a future conference paper!

        When it comes to storyboarding, I cannot recommend highly enough "Panel Discussions" by Damon S. Talon, published by TwoMorrows. Talon does interviews with a couple dozen pros, highlighting what each one does best. Well illustrated, as you would expect for a book of this sort. I got mine from the local comic shop, but you might try Amazon.

        As for art, I am a writer above all, and what experience I have had with artists is always to encourage them to do that which they are most excited about doing. If you really want to use sepia tones, then go for it. Don't feel like you have to make the art "authentic" medieval; an "outside" approach done skillfully is better than a "strict adaptation" done poorly.

        And let us see what you do!

        Cheers,
        Jason Tondro

        >
        > From: "Reynold Greenleaf" <ReynoldGreenleaf@...>
        > Date: 2005/11/09 Wed AM 09:44:35 PST
        > To: arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [arthurian_comixlist] Comic styles and story boarding
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • michael peters
        Reynold, I think any style that suits the story and your abilities would work -- that being said, some styles like the faux-medieval bad perspective style, or,
        Message 3 of 4 , Nov 11, 2005
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          Reynold,

          I think any style that suits the story and your abilities would work -- that being said, some styles like the faux-medieval bad perspective style, or, as a writer once pitched to me , a story told entirely with visuals based on the Bayeux tapestry (I turned it down because it would have been boring to draw) -- such gimmicks would wear thin too fast to work for an entire graphic novel. Those styles could work very effectively in short bursts of exposition or flashback scenes.

          Any adaptation of existing stories (public domain, I assume?) would entail some editing, if nothing else, then to avoid repeating in drawings what's mentioned in text and vice-versa, just to avoid redundancy. Have you read any of Will Eisner's books on the comics form, or Scott McCloud's Understanding Comics? Personally I don't agree with all of McCloud's assertions, but it gets you thinking about the nuts and bolts of the medium.

          As for "storyboarding", while many comics artists moon-light as storyboard artists, the approaches are quite different, since storyboards are a means to an end, while comics are an end in and of themselves.

          Dave Sim (Cerebus) has proved, but perhaps pushed the rules too far, that comics can accommodate pages of text. He used this successfully in the Cerebus volume "Jaka's Story" and less successfully elsewhere. If you investigate Sim's work, don't let his more recent controversies put you off his better work.

          Hope this helps.

          Best of luck,

          Michael
          The Art of Michael L. Peters
          http://mlpeters.com


          Reynold Greenleaf <ReynoldGreenleaf@...> wrote:
          Hi Everyone

          I am an amateur artist and am thinking of trying to get a graphic
          novel together. My idea is to take some existing, but little known
          mediaeval stories and weave them into a graphic novel.

          My question is two fold.

          First off I was wondering what sort of style to use. Do i go for the
          mediaeval falt style with little to no perspective, or do I try a
          more Frank Miller style of black and white with the odd bit of
          colour, or indeed (my preferred option) to go for sepia inks and
          colourwash.

          Secondly, I would like some pionters on story boarding. Some of the
          texts I am using are prose, some poems. I want to transfer this into
          a framed story for use in a graphic novel, rather than just
          illustrating the story. What, if any, are the general rules regarding
          storyboarding. I do not want to loose the story line, but neither do
          I think it appropriate to include the full prose.

          Your thoughts would be most welcome.

          Regards

          Reynold






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        • Reynold Greenleaf
          Greetings one and all Thank you for the responses so far. In light of the a couple of comments I would like to add a couple of things. Firstly an apology, I am
          Message 4 of 4 , Nov 17, 2005
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            Greetings one and all

            Thank you for the responses so far.

            In light of the a couple of comments I would like to add a couple of
            things.

            Firstly an apology, I am a rank beginner and hobbyist artist so my use
            of terminnology may be awry, such as 'storyboarding'. My question in
            relation to that was meant to find a means of being able to break the
            story down into frames for the final output.

            This leads on to the second point. The stories are indedd in the
            public domain, most of them have been around for five hundred years,
            at least! I am drawing from copies of original manuscripts and various
            translations, but in essence the stories have been told and retold for
            many generations. Some of the stories will be lesser known ones, I see
            little reason in re-hashing stories that are so well known these days.
            I think the well known ones stand the risk fo becoming passé by being
            retold and redrawn time after time. By re-enlivening some of the
            lesser known stories I hope to bring an awareness of the rich vein of
            storytelling available and this will also beneift the better known
            stories.

            I know, I sound pretentious, but it is all low key. If I ever get it
            done it will be the realisation of a pipe dream for me, as I say I am
            an amateur in this, I am a structural draughtsman by trade with a
            great love of my Celtic/British heritage.

            Take care and good luck

            Reynold

            --- In arthurian_comixlist@yahoogroups.com, michael peters
            <mlpetersartist@y...> wrote:
            >
            > Any adaptation of existing stories (public domain, I assume?)
            >
            > As for "storyboarding",
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