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Re: [arthurian_comixlist] CFContributors: THE ARTHUR OF THE COMICS

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  • Alan Stewart
    Count me in as well, Michael! Alan __________________________________ Do you Yahoo!? Yahoo! Mail - Find what you need with new enhanced search.
    Message 1 of 7 , Mar 10, 2005
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      Count me in as well, Michael!

      Alan



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    • Jason Tondro
      I was at ComiCon last night and bumped into John Van Fleet, whom I stole for a few minutes to talk about his work on the Batman Grail book, The Chalice.
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 20, 2006
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        I was at ComiCon last night and bumped into John Van Fleet, whom I
        stole for a few minutes to talk about his work on the Batman Grail
        book, "The Chalice."

        Fleet was pretty happy with his work on the book. He said that he
        approached Dixon with the idea of a story in which Batman finds the
        Holy Grail, then Dixon did the research that resulted in elements
        like the Gawaine angle, the Fisher King, the Templars, and so on
        being introduced. Dixon also chose Ra's as the villain.

        He commented on the ending, in which Batman gives Superman the Holy
        Grail for safe keeping. "We needed someone who could protect the
        Grail, but didn't need it. And so that led us to Superman." He and
        Dixon have talked about a sequel book in which Superman has the Grail
        and is tempted to use it to save the lives of those his own powers
        fail to protect.

        Perhaps Fleet's most interesting comment, however, was on something
        that occurred to him after the book was published. He realized later
        that he was surprised that DC had allowed him to do the story, since
        the book makes it pretty clear that the Holy Grail is real and has
        power, while DC is "such a jewish company." That is, by admitting the
        existence of the Grail, the book seems to acknowledge the power of
        Christ and Christianity over Judaism. "It's not as if Batman was
        questing for the Ark of the Covenant," I suggested, clarifying the
        contrast, and he nodded and smiled, "Yes, exactly."

        This conversation brought to you by the letter J.

        Cheers,
        Jason
      • RODNEYFFC@AOL.COM
        Jason, Thanks for the great bit of background. We can only hope to see Superman/Chalice one day! Rodney In a message dated 7/20/2006 12:22:47 PM Eastern
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 20, 2006
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          Jason,

          Thanks for the great bit of background. We can only hope to see
          Superman/Chalice one day!

          Rodney

          In a message dated 7/20/2006 12:22:47 PM Eastern Daylight Time,
          jtondro@... writes:
          I was at ComiCon last night and bumped into John Van Fleet, whom I
          stole for a few minutes to talk about his work on the Batman Grail
          book, "The Chalice."

          Fleet was pretty happy with his work on the book. He said that he
          approached Dixon with the idea of a story in which Batman finds the
          Holy Grail, then Dixon did the research that resulted in elements
          like the Gawaine angle, the Fisher King, the Templars, and so on
          being introduced. Dixon also chose Ra's as the villain.

          He commented on the ending, in which Batman gives Superman the Holy
          Grail for safe keeping. "We needed someone who could protect the
          Grail, but didn't need it. And so that led us to Superman." He and
          Dixon have talked about a sequel book in which Superman has the Grail
          and is tempted to use it to save the lives of those his own powers
          fail to protect.

          Perhaps Fleet's most interesting comment, however, was on something
          that occurred to him after the book was published. He realized later
          that he was surprised that DC had allowed him to do the story, since
          the book makes it pretty clear that the Holy Grail is real and has
          power, while DC is "such a jewish company." That is, by admitting the
          existence of the Grail, the book seems to acknowledge the power of
          Christ and Christianity over Judaism. "It's not as if Batman was
          questing for the Ark of the Covenant," I suggested, clarifying the
          contrast, and he nodded and smiled, "Yes, exactly."

          This conversation brought to you by the letter J.

          Cheers,
          Jason


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