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balky students

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  • barefootfayrie
    question: how do you deal with a student who simply refuses to listen? i have a couple of kids who are in the gt program at their school (i teach private
    Message 1 of 2 , May 3, 2006
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      question: how do you deal with a student who simply refuses to listen?
      i have a couple of kids who are in the gt program at their school (i
      teach private groups and individuals) and its become very apparent
      that they are aware of their "special status". i have absolutely no
      problem with a student who asks me "why?" and will happily explain to
      them why we do what we do in class. i do have a problem with a kid who
      constantly challenges me and wants to argue with every suggestion or
      technique i offer and tell me "we don't do it that way at school" or
      simply "i don't want to do it that way". i have explained that
      different teachers do things different ways and that their job is to
      experience all "the ways" so they can pick the one that works best for
      them because everyone works and learns differently. i do not ever
      question or contradict their classroom teacher and tell them they are
      not to either, but learn from both and "when in rome, do as the
      romans". in other words, respect your teacher and listen to them! last
      night one particular student was having trouble with her proportions;
      i asked her if she was measuring it the way i showed her and she said
      no. when i asked why not she just said "because i don't like doing
      it". i don't think its a question of avoiding it because she doesn't
      understand because she has demonstrated her ability before; i really
      think she doesn't want to do it because she wants to go directly to
      the "fun stuff". but then her perfectionist tendencies kick in and she
      gets frustrated. her mom has also questioned why she
      isn't "progressing on level" (what level? this isn't school, this is
      private lessons.we are striving for a certain level of quality work to
      be sure, but its based on the inividual childs' personal best, not
      some outside standard. i try to keep in mind state minimum
      requirements, etc., but the kids are allowed to progress at their own
      speed. school is fine, but this is something different.)and when i
      tried to explain (very diplomatically. no, really)mom just smiled and
      said something about "well gt you know". well i don't care how smart
      the kid is, smart doesn't work if you don't apply it and are willing
      to work and as you can see by this post, i am getting tired of leading
      this particular horse to the water when she won't drink!
      help!
      being flummoxed and possibly out-foxed by a 6 yr. old, paula
    • jscofiel@midtel.net
      ... friend the music teacher. and coincidently they mostly are enrichment students as we call them at our school. a kindergarten enrichment student that come
      Message 2 of 2 , May 3, 2006
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        > I HEAR ya!!! i have students who do the same sort of thing as does my
        friend the music teacher. and coincidently they mostly are enrichment
        students as we call them at our school. a kindergarten enrichment
        student that come tomind just the othet day was constantly asking me
        if her painting was "right" and i told her if she likes it that way
        then it was fine because it is HER painting not mine. I agree
        completely about the reasoning in which their i.q. doesn't mean that
        they can function or work well in a group or have rewarding
        relationshipds with the rest of society. i work in public school in a
        rural area of ny and i don't see things changing around here. if i
        hear of anything i"ll let you know! jeannie.
        > question: how do you deal with a student who simply refuses to listen?
        > i have a couple of kids who are in the gt program at their school (i
        > teach private groups and individuals) and its become very apparent
        > that they are aware of their "special status". i have absolutely no
        > problem with a student who asks me "why?" and will happily explain to
        > them why we do what we do in class. i do have a problem with a kid who
        > constantly challenges me and wants to argue with every suggestion or
        > technique i offer and tell me "we don't do it that way at school" or
        > simply "i don't want to do it that way". i have explained that
        > different teachers do things different ways and that their job is to
        > experience all "the ways" so they can pick the one that works best for
        > them because everyone works and learns differently. i do not ever
        > question or contradict their classroom teacher and tell them they are
        > not to either, but learn from both and "when in rome, do as the
        > romans". in other words, respect your teacher and listen to them! last
        > night one particular student was having trouble with her proportions;
        > i asked her if she was measuring it the way i showed her and she said
        > no. when i asked why not she just said "because i don't like doing
        > it". i don't think its a question of avoiding it because she doesn't
        > understand because she has demonstrated her ability before; i really
        > think she doesn't want to do it because she wants to go directly to
        > the "fun stuff". but then her perfectionist tendencies kick in and she
        > gets frustrated. her mom has also questioned why she
        > isn't "progressing on level" (what level? this isn't school, this is
        > private lessons.we are striving for a certain level of quality work to
        > be sure, but its based on the inividual childs' personal best, not
        > some outside standard. i try to keep in mind state minimum
        > requirements, etc., but the kids are allowed to progress at their own
        > speed. school is fine, but this is something different.)and when i
        > tried to explain (very diplomatically. no, really)mom just smiled and
        > said something about "well gt you know". well i don't care how smart
        > the kid is, smart doesn't work if you don't apply it and are willing
        > to work and as you can see by this post, i am getting tired of leading
        > this particular horse to the water when she won't drink!
        > help!
        > being flummoxed and possibly out-foxed by a 6 yr. old, paula
        >
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